What makes your art “important” to the world?

What makes your art “important” to the world?


the inspiration for this painting began
when I wanted to go out and take a walk through a forest. it had been very rainy
and cold and it seemed like there were mushrooms popping up out of the ground
everywhere and so I thought that this one forest we visited that had the most
diverse selection of fungus I’d ever seen would just be poppin with exciting
things to look at! I imagined there would be a huge variety,
incredible colors, spooky shapes, disgusting textures… I guess I expected a
lot. so one day we put on our gloves and scarfs and we went for it. it was pretty
far out of the way so when we got there I couldn’t help but feel a little bit
disappointed. there was actually less diversity than the first time we had
gone there and so when I came home, I thought: you know, I could have gone
somewhere much closer to experience what we just experienced today. I felt a
little dissatisfied by the experience because my expectations were so high. and
so when I got some free time I decided to create a forest of mushrooms for
myself to fix this moment that was supposed to happen and just didn’t. and
that’s how this painting ultimately came about. this experience touches
on why artists and especially writers create their work in the first place.
when people ask us why we make art we often struggle to think about what a
suitable answer would be, because in reality, it seems like we’re doing it
kind of selfishly. I painted this forest of mushrooms because I thought it would
be nice. I thought it would be cool. I thought I would enjoy it. and there is a
small amount of art snobbery, especially in the beginning of your study.
they’re very much obsessed with doing something that MEANS something, that’s
going to change the world. that sentiment tends to create a weird
environment where only some kinds of art matter. it creates
artists statements that are laden with difficult terminology, overly reaching
connections and just kind of makes it seem like the viewer is just too stupid
to understand. it tends to isolate viewers, which is not really what you
want. and wow I didn’t really mean to go off on this tangent. I guess what I’m
trying to really say is that people pick up hobbies in general as a coping
mechanism. life is hard … even when your life is easy compared to the rest
of the world, life is still somehow just kind of hard. I definitely picked up art
because I was isolated a lot and so I think that artists use art to cope with
their personal situations by either… avoiding them, by creating straight
up fantasy environments. or you do it by reliving the situation, by painting
things that are accurate depictions of what happened. or doing a mix of both
which is recreating the moment, as I’m trying to do here, where it’s a real
moment, it’s an accurate depiction of what I experienced, except that it’s
heavily edited… so it crosses the line between reality and fantasy. we
complete this experience by sharing it with others. especially now with the
internet, it’s so easy to share with others. I know when I was in college and
I was still struggling with the “why am I doing this? maybe I need to be more
relevant? maybe I need to do something more raw? negative to fit in? and make my
art seem like it’s important?” I did a painting of myself just being kind of
sad and helpless in my work uniform and it got people’s attention. we talked
about our feelings of helplessness having to do things that we don’t enjoy,
taking a lot of abuse just to get money to live. and so that painting got
significantly more response than any of my other boring “non
artistic” paintings. and well it’s pretty obvious that if you shared something
positive with the world, fantasy world, a recreation done right,
something beautiful… people will take comfort in it and connect with it and
make friends with you just because people like that stuff. it feels
really superficial. but even if you’re sharing something negative, like an ugly
painting that’s just something raw and feeling…. people still take comfort in
that painting because it normalizes negative feelings that others are having
that maybe they don’t really share with anyone else. it makes them feel less
alone and it gives them an outlet to start a discourse about it and the
results are the same. you connect with people, you make friends.
and by making friends, by joining people together on something that they either
hate or that they love, or a source of comfort, you are literally changing the
world to be better. it makes you feel empowered over something that you
thought had power over you. and I think that’s what makes art and writing and
other kinds of creative hobbies feel so addictive and makes you want to keep
going, because that little tiny bit of power to just edit your life as you see
fit and see how it edits the life of somebody else even for just a moment… it
makes all the work really worth it and maybe that sounds a little conceited but
I think it’s true. in this painting I just wanted to fix one thing. just one
little thing that just annoyed me that week… as entitled as it may seem to have
expectations like that… but I did. I created this world as mushroom forests
that I wished that I could see in real life and experience and feel Wonder. and
just by thinking about it I felt like I had some kind of power over my
surrounding. and hope that this painting manages to delight somebody… and
changes the world in a positive way for even just one second. and that’s the “why”.
put it in your artist statement! you don’t have to make art to change the
world because your art already changes the world,
in one way or another. as always, this painting will be available in the shop
and probably on RedBubble. don’t forget that I’m open for commissions.
anyway thanks for watching guys I’ll see you next time

8 thoughts on “What makes your art “important” to the world?”

  • Anne Frances Elder says:

    I love this painting and seeing you create. I love your style and your dialogue. What amazed me is you manage to create washes of colour and do the minute details all with one brush. Look forward to seeing more, and do you send internationally as my aim is to one day own a piece of your work? Hugs, Fran x

  • Anne Frances Elder says:

    I love this painting and seeing you create. I love your style and your dialogue. What amazed me is you manage to create washes of colour and do the minute details all with one brush. Look forward to seeing more, and do you send internationally as my aim is to one day own a piece of your work? Hugs, Fran x

  • I love what you said in this video.. hobbies are a coping mechanism for sure 👌 so much relatable truth in this. Thanks for not only a beautiful painting you shared with us but the comforting chat as well xo🎨

  • I haven’t watched your videos in a while because I just finished a hyper intense year long school programme, but I broke my ankle on Wednesday and I’ve been in the hospital waiting for surgery and so I’ve had some time to kill. Thank you for this. I needed to see this special mushroom forest and also needed to hear what you were saying about our art and what it means. I always find comfort in what you share with us, and I am so grateful for that.

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