Vista: Parks from Ridge to River Episode 2

Vista: Parks from Ridge to River Episode 2


In this episode of Vista: Parks from
Ridge to River we will visit Palomar Mountain State Park within Ingmar
Sorenseene as he talks about the history of the Civilian Conservation Corps’ role
at the park. We will also take a look at one of the many interpretive programs at
Anza-Borrego Desert State Park with Park Interpretive Specialist Regina Reiter. Hello, and welcome to Palomar Mountain
State Park my name is Ingmar Sorenseene and I’m the state park’s interpreter here
at Palomar Mountain State Park. Today we’re going to talk about the history
and legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps. The Civilian Conservation Corps
was created by the Roosevelt administration during our first term in
1933. The Roosevelt administration wanted to allow people of every walk and part
of society to be able to connect back with nature. This was during a vital time
during the Great Depression. People had it hard enough and people needed a
non-expensive outlet and the easiest one was to go out into preserved lands and
get people back in touch with nature. Hiking doesn’t want cost a lot of money,
well at least it didn’t in the 30’s. So that allowed people to go out and
explore the resources which the state and federal government has set aside for
public use. Now when the Roosevelt administration came in the state and
federal parks were of a preserved but not necessarily accessible nature, so
many of these state parks that we now enjoy today were made accessible by the
Civilian Conservation Corps. With the simple addition of roads, basic services
such as water, camping stoves, campgrounds, picnic benches, and other things. The
Civilian Conservation Corps’ mark here on Palomar Mountain is a legacy that we
will always take very seriously. Not only do we still use that very legacy today,
most of these stoves are 80 years old for instance. But, we also have around us
a park which was constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps. Starting in
1933 the Civilian Conservation Corps sent company 904, the first company to
come to Palomar Mountain State Park. They camped in Doane Valley, built a mess hall
and other facilities and built the Doane Valley Campground that we enjoy today.
Not only did they build that campground but they dredged Doane Pond, making it a
not only seasonal but year-round source of water and entertainment for fishing
and recreational activities. They a small dam to keep as much water as
possible in there without diverting any streams that had already naturally run
through the valley. The Civilian Conservation Corps also built residences
one and two. Residents two, which became a residents later on in our parks history,
was originally the blacksmith shop and allowed for the Civilian Conservation
Corps to pound out metal items that they might need for their construction
activities. Another contribution the Civilian Conservation Corps made to
Palomar Mountain State Park, was the Booker Hill fire lookout. Originally set
up in the 20s with a metal stand, the Booker Hill fire lookout was a temporary
seasonal structure and not a structure you would want to spend a night in. But
during the 1930’s, the Civilian Conservation Corps built the second
lookout with a stone base and wooden full structure, almost to resemble a
lighthouse. This allowed the fire lookouts to man the post year-round if
they wanted to. Without the Civilian Conservation Corps, we would not be able
to use the campgrounds, the stoves, the picnic areas, and everything other
amenity that the Civilian Conservation Corps provided for us and especially for
you the visitor, and I would welcome you to come on up and visit us here and to
get in touch with the history and the legacy of the Civilian Conservation
Corps. Thank you. Our state parks offer a variety of interpretive programs for you
to enjoy when you visit. Here is a quick look at one of the program’s at
Anza-Borrego Desert State Park with Park Interpretive Specialist Regina Reiter as
she presents “Beaks and Feet”. Beaks and Feet, I hope at the end of this that you feel free to go look at birds
with a view of noticing a couple of their features, the beaks and feet. Go at
bird-watching with gusto and not worry that you don’t
the names of all the birds. Guarantee that you will see at least ten birds up
close. So what is it that birds have that no other animals have? With these two
characteristics the beaks and the feet you’ll first zoom in on those it gives
you a whole range of information about the bird. There’s so much more to a bird than its name. There is
indeed more to birds than just the names. Be sure to check out some of the
inspiring interpretive programs when you visit a California State Park.

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