The Making Of Lil Mosey’s “Noticed” With Royce David | Deconstructed

The Making Of Lil Mosey’s “Noticed” With Royce David | Deconstructed


I’ll be playing a beat and something, and
Mosey, he’s on his phone quiet, for like five minutes. Then he comes up to me, whispers in my ear. He’s like, “Listen to this.” Some melody. And the flow, and the melody just together
over the beat, I was like, “Bruh how did you even come up with that?” In like two seconds too. I met Mosey like two years ago. And like I really just believed in him. He felt the same. So like yeah we’re ‘bout to just grind
this out and now here we are today. We made this track like a year ago. 2017. We had a rough idea. The older one was slower. It wasn’t fully fleshed out. But we knew the potential of the song and
we knew the lyrics were fire. We know it’s about to be a hit. There were just a couple things we need
to do. When I first started “Noticed,” I started
with the keys. We basically already had this melody from
the old idea, but what I did was I pitched it up one semitone just to give it a new vibe
and a little more energy. I just chose a piano that was super anthemic. I added reverb, chorus, just to kind of spread
it a little bit. And then I EQ’d it following. I have two synths basically on top of the
keys. The first one is Nexus sound which I thought
was big, full. And then the second was from Tone2, ElectraX. And then these two synths on top of the keys
is what I used to really make it just go like this instead of it being like this. Before everything dropped, I added a hat which
is a different than the drop hat pattern. The blue one is the build-up hat pattern basically,
and it sounds like this. Yeah it’s really just for getting ready
to drop. And then to drop it’s pretty much just like
four on the floor. Instead of just like straight hats, I added
a little bit of velocity changes on every single one. It felt more like a real hat instead of a
computerized hat, that’s why I added a little velocity in those ones. Yeah, and then after the beat drops, I have
three hats and two open hats. I just thought they worked well together. Instead of having it just be straight 16th
notes, I just have more hat rolls and stuff. And then the open hat just kind of gives it
that bounce. It really does feel like puzzle pieces. Once I put all the pieces together, it’s
fye. Then what I did was I added the 808. And once I added the 808s, I knew. I was like, “Yeah this is filthy.” I wanted to make sure that everyone could
hear the bass, and to do that I boosted these mid-range frequencies because the low was
already set, but I really wanted to make sure that people could the higher frequencies in
the bass ‘cause this is a cool ass 808 too. And I also wanted to make sure that even on
iPhones and shit like that you could hear the bass. That’s why I added this EQ. On top of the 808 I added a kick. The kick and the 808 together… Then I added a snare. There’s one more sound that I don’t think
a lot of people know about. Every time the one hits, it just hits even harder. And then of course at the end I always add
a tag. That tag is from this old ass song that’s
not even released. Mosey just, I don’t know why he said it, but
he just said “Ayy Royce, you did it right here” like before he recorded, and we were
like damn that’s filthy, I’m about to use that. I was like that’s fire, I’m about to use that
in all my beats now. Throughout the song and the verses and all
the beat drops, I pitched down the keys an octave but I didn’t do it the conventional
way. How I really did it was I used Gross Beat. And the only reason why I did that was because
it sounded cool to be honest. So the last thing I did once I had the full
beat and everything was fleshed out and sounded fire. It’s part of my signature sound but I always
be like, cutting out the beat and then bringing it back. That’s what this automation right here is,
it just keeps that energy going. And so that’s why I always be adding the
drops. When we do shows, everything, everyone’s
screaming that, ‘cause they know it’s ‘bout to drop next, you know? This is the climax, so we’re taking it all
the way down… …and then it’s gonna go all the way back
up again. That’s the other reason why everything is
just in one, I use one DAW. Everything’s all Ableton is because I build
the beat first, then the vocals come on, and then I build the beat around the vocals a
little bit more too, just to seal the deal. So yeah here’s the final beat. When I hear this instrumental, to be honest,
I just hear arenas, it’s just like anthemic you know? It was just music that after we recorded it,
I wanted to keep listening to it, you know? It was hella catchy, I was like, “Bruh.” “This is some good ass music that
we’re making right now,” and I just knew that it was only a matter of time before everyone
knows it. You know?

100 thoughts on “The Making Of Lil Mosey’s “Noticed” With Royce David | Deconstructed”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *