The European Capitol of Terrorism: Belfast – VICE Travel – Part 4 of 4

The European Capitol of Terrorism: Belfast – VICE Travel – Part 4 of 4


MALE SPEAKER: After the march,
we headed up the road to the Catholic area of Ardoyne. But if we were looking for
calm, for sobriety and level-headedness, we weren’t
going to find it there either. On July 12, the anger
is ecumenical. MALE SPEAKER: One in every three
people killed during the conflict were killed in one
square mile of North Belfast. So it was quite intense. And the emotions around it
are still quite high. MALE SPEAKER: While a gaggle of
journalists waited up the road, Jerry smuggled us
in with the marchers. But they were still hostile to
the presence of our cameras. Angry that a portion of the
Orange parade was marching down a road that separated
Catholic and Protestant communities, one that they
called their road, they demanded that they, too,
be allowed to march. The country’s parades commission
wouldn’t allow it, fearful that the two groups
would meet on the street and tear each other to pieces. MALE SPEAKER: Come out at the
top of the road, this was initially where it was
going to come out. And it’s blocked by PSNI and a
bunch of what look like four or five armored things. And if you notice over there,
they are fully in riot gear, with helmets and shields
and all that. When the Orange Order comes by
at probably around 8:00, these two exits were totally
blocked. MALE SPEAKER: Yes. MALE SPEAKER: People
can’t get out. [MUSIC PLAYING] [MUSIC PLAYING] [MUSIC PLAYING] [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER: Fucking Christ! MALE SPEAKER: In the midst of
the chaos, we found Martin Meehan, a former IRA prisoner
and a leading dissident Republican who opposes
the peace process. Meehan took the opportunity
to heap scorn on those Republicans who have entered
mainstream politics. It’s hypocritical, he says,
for them to condemn the violence in Ardoyne. MALE SPEAKER: We’re on the other
side where we police are, where the Protestant
neighborhood is, and where the march came by. And you can see the refuse,
and the debris, and the incredibly heavy, almost
a rock like police presence here. And they’re not going to
be going anywhere. Because this thing isn’t
ending any time soon. The kids aren’t getting tired. And there are petrol bombs. One just went off right there. And fireworks are going off. And the police firing
plastic bullets. And this is a pretty common
occurrence around this time of year. And again, one has to realize,
we are in Great Britain. And there’s fucking
war on the street. This just looks like it’s
going to keep going, and going, and going, until these
kids get so tired that they can’t throw any more rocks. [LAUGHTER] MALE SPEAKER: He says he’s
not a man of vows. MALE SPEAKER: [INAUDIBLE] on the other side
of your face. MALE SPEAKER: What happened
in Ardoyne for instance, last night? There’s a number
of [INAUDIBLE] reasons. There’s not just one reason. Yes, some of it is kids
venting steam. And the reality is, it’s
exciting for young people. They’re looking up at the people
in their community. They want to feel important
in their community. They want to be known. There’s a huge gap between
what’s happening on the ground in young people’s lives and
what’s happening at the top politically. As an uneasy calm returned to
Belfast, we talked to some Catholic kids who went to the
riots in Ardoyne just as spectators. They helped us to code
the local graffiti. MALE SPEAKER: And Huns
are Protestants? MALE SPEAKER: OK. And do you know why you
call them Huns? MALE SPEAKER: All right. And there’s a bunch of these. You see this all
over the place. [DOG BARKING] MALE SPEAKER: Does it seem like
anything was accomplished the next day after, for
instance, after Ardoyne this year? MALE SPEAKER: Why do you
guys go over there? You don’t live right in
that neighborhood. MALE SPEAKER: If either of you
went to your father and said, I want to join the paramilitary
organization, specifically continuity,
for instance. What would he say? MALE SPEAKER: So you’re a
liability to the organization? MALE SPEAKER: So if you had a
gun, you would go down and shoot as many as you could? FEMALE SPEAKER: [SINGING] Oh, the water is wide. And I can’t cross o’er. And either have high
wings to fly. Give me a [INAUDIBLE] I can carry, too. And both shall go
my [INAUDIBLE].

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