Sports and Recreation Management: Participation Trends – Open2Study

Sports and Recreation Management: Participation Trends – Open2Study


In this topic we’re going to
look at some participation trends in the sport and
recreation industry. Imagine 40, 50 years ago, this
is the body of people who were active, and most of them would
have been involved in some sort of competitive or
organised sport. A few people would have gone out
jogging and done fitness based activities, but most
people were involved in some sort of organised sport. So this is how our whole
active population. What’s happened now though, is
that we’ve had a division, and perhaps this many people
are now involved in organised sport. So a much smaller proportion
of the population. This many people over here are
perhaps involved in fitness based activity. So moving away from the
organised either Saturday, or mid-week evening sport, that
regular time commitment, and perhaps they’ve taken up a
fitness activity, which they can do at the time
that suits them. It may not be the same time
every week, it may not be the same time every day. So, this group of people played
football on a Saturday, this group of people might go to
the gym three times a week, but sometimes it’s Monday
afternoon, sometimes it’s Wednesday lunchtime, sometimes
it’s Thursday morning. It’s a bit flexible to fit
around their busy lifestyle. And this group of people down
the bottom, they’re the ones that do nothing. They’re the ones that we’ve
lost out of the sport and rec industry. They’re the ones that are at
risk of that increased obesity because they’re not doing
regular exercise. Because even this fitness group
over here, they’re the ones out walking the dog
on a regular basis. This 60% group down
the bottom. They’re the ones that are at
increased risk of those heart diseases and obesity. They’re the ones that we really
need to focus on. We’ve looked at the trends in
adult participation now we’re going to have a look at what’s
happening with children participation in sports. It’s a little bit different. The adult organised sport
participation is decreasing, the percentage of children
that are participating in organised sport is actually
increasing. So there’s been a gradual, or
a very slight, increase in participation rates for children
up to about the age of 12 to 14 in organised
sport and dance. They’ve included dance in that
so the ballet lessons that the young children have. So if we look at this, there’s
that quite high level of participation around 12 to 14,
but then it drops off quite dramatically, and this is
a little bit concerning. That drop off signifies a whole
group of young people that are heading for that 60%
of people that don’t do regular exercise. There’s not a lot of teenagers,
for example, that will just on their own, for
their own reasons, hop up out of bed and go for a run. They’ll go for a run if they
play football, or cricket, or netball, or hockey and
they need to be fit to play that sport. But if they don’t have a reason,
and a driver to be fit, they’ll just laze
around the house. So it’s a really worrying
statistic. We can wonder why this age group
is so significant in that tailing off. It’s worth noting that it’s
about the time that young people transition from primary
school to high school, so that they’re changing very
significantly the way that they study, and that the sort
of schooling that they have. They might have different groups
of friends that arrive on their doorstep in that era. They may discover video games. Their parents probably have a
little less control because as we get to being a teenager we
start to sort of flex our muscles and want to take charge
of ourselves and our parents don’t have a say
in what we do as much. Normally when we’re 8 to 10
years old we tend to do what our parents want us to do. And if they want us to play a
sport, well, we’ll go along and play a sport. It’s also the time that young
people reach puberty, and there’s a whole lot of changes
in body shape. And that can stop them wanting
to put on skimpy sports costumes, because for girls
they’re developing breasts, for boys they might have that
bit of puffy fat around their waist and they’re feeling
very self conscious. And they’re not feeling like
they want to get out and exercise and be amongst
their friends. And finally there’s the
peer group pressure. A friend’s daughter who started
high school recently and I was asking her the other
day how it was going, and she said well, the classes are OK,
but I really miss being able to run around and play
[? chasee ?] at lunch time because we’re not allowed
to do that. And it’s not that they’re
not allowed to do that. It’s just that the peer group
pressure of a high school situation doesn’t let girls
run around at lunch time. It’s OK for boys to run around
and play football, or brandy, or handball, but girls are
expected to just sit down and talk amongst themselves. So all of those things are
leading to this decrease in participation, and heading those
young people to that 60% of people that don’t do
regular exercise. Now that we have an
understanding of some of the trends in the sport and
recreation industry, in the next topic we’re going to look
at ways that we can maybe increase participation in sport
and recreation through being inclusive in
our practises.

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