Sesame Street Explores National Parks: Gateway National Recreation Area — Nests

Sesame Street Explores National Parks: Gateway National Recreation Area — Nests


Sesame Street Explores
National Parks. [SINGING] We are park rangers, we take
care of the parks. We look at rocks and animals,
investigate tree bark. Observe butterflies that
flutter, look for fireflies that float. We are park rangers, and
we explore the parks. Yeah! Wanna play park ranger
with Elmo and Murray? Great! Come on! Come on! Oh. Say hello to Ranger Shalini,
from the Gateway National Recreation Area! Hello, Ranger Shalini! Hi. Hi, guys. What rangery stuff are
we learning about today, Ranger Shalini? Today we are going to
learn about nests. Ooh. I know all about nests. Go ahead. Ask me anything about nests. Ask me! Ask me! OK, Ranger Murray. Uh– ooh. Why do birds build nests? Oh, good question. Uh, birds build nests
because, uh– well, well birds build nests
because they, uh– a little help, Ranger Shalini? Birds build nests to keep
their babies safe. What she said. Any more nest questions? Or, as I like to call
them, nestions? Elmo has another question. Go ahead. Well, what do birds build
their nests out of? Another good question! Well, what’s the answer,
Ranger Murray? I believe most birds buy
prefabricated nests from their local nest emporium. Isn’t that correct,
Ranger Shalini? Not at all. Birds build nests with different
items they find in their environment. Like sticks. Oh. Maybe I don’t know so much
about bests after all. Wanna know more? Yeah! Well, let’s use our binoculars
at Gateway to see more birds. Oh, good idea. Families of Herring Gulls build
nests close to each other on the ground. Each family takes care
of their own nest but stay in a big group. Piping Plovers don’t
build nests. They lay their eggs right on the
sand, and the parents take turns sitting on the egg
until it hatches. Canada Geese build their nests
on the ground just like Herring Gulls. Baby geese are called
goslings. Goslings can leave the nest a
day after hatching while their parents stay close by. Ospreys build their nests off
the ground using items they find in the salt marsh,
like sticks. Ospreys have to make a large
nest, because their baby chicks grow big before
they’re able to fly. Those families were so caring. Yeah. And Ranger Elmo really
likes those nests. Me, too. They look so comfy and cozy! Absolutely. Boy. Ranger Elmo wishes he could
explore some more nests. Well, let’s do it. You mean right here? Right now? In our own park? Of course. What are we waiting
for, rangers? Let’s use our binoculars
and observe some nests! Come on! Birds aren’t the only animals
that build nets. This is an eastern tent
caterpillar nest. eastern tent caterpillars build
their nests out of silk. And over there is a
squirrel’s nest. And they build their nests
out of sticks and leaves. Those nests are the best! Wanna be like a park ranger? Then go outside and explore
all the nests. But remember, nests are homes. So don’t get too close. Yeah. See you outside on
Sesame Street. And at the park. Peace! Bye-bye. Bye. Sesame Street Explores National
Parks is produced in partnership with the National
Park Service and the National Park Foundation, who would
like to remind you that National Parks belong
to everyone. So be like a park ranger and
help keep our parks clean, safe, and healthy. Special thanks to Grand Canyon
National Park and Gateway National Recreation Area.

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