Sen. Scott Jensen On Legalizing Recreational Marijuana

Sen. Scott Jensen On Legalizing Recreational Marijuana


COULD MINNESOTA BECOME THE 11th STATE TO LEGALIZE RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA. THERE ARE PROPOSALS THAT WOULD DO JUST THAT . A LEGISLATION EFFORT IS GAINING GROUND THROUGHOUT THE STATE. SOME LEGISLATORS SAY IT IS A MATTER OF TIME BEFORE MINNESOTA JOINS THE RANKS OF THOSE ALLOWING LEGAL POT SMOKING FOR PLEASURE. MURPHY HAS TONIGHT’S TALKING POINTS. MINNESOTA IS ONE OF THE STATES THAT ALLOW MARIJUANA FOR MEDICAL USE. THE PUSH FOR LEGALIZING POT FOR RECREATIONAL USE HAS GOTTEN A MAJOR BOOST RECENTLY. AS OF THIS YEAR, THERE ARE CURRENTLY TWO POLITICAL PARTIES IN MINNESOTA THAT HAVE QUALIFIED FOR MAJOR POLITICAL PARTY STATUS BECAUSE THEIR CANDIDATES GOT MORE THAN 5% OF THE STATEWIDE VOTE IN NOVEMBER. THAT MEANS THEIR CANDIDATES HAVE AUTOMATIC ACCESS TO APPEAR ON MINNESOTA BALLOTS. IN THE LEGISLATURE, A BIPARTISAN GROUP OF LEADERS PROPOSED A BILL LEGALIZING POT BY 2022. ONE OF THE AUTHORS IS SCOTT JENSEN, WHO IS ALSO A FAMILY PHYSICIAN. JENSEN IS A REPUBLICAN FROM CONSERVATIVE CARTER COUNTY. HE WAS A GUEST ON WCCO SUNDAY MORNING. WE HAVE SEEN A PERFECT STORM. LAST NOVEMBER, MICHIGAN LEGALIZED MARIJUANA. THAT MEANS MINNESOTANS CAN GO GET WHAT THEY WANT TO. HIS REPUBLICAN COLLEAGUES ARE SAYING NOT SO FAST. THEY ARE PROMISING TO BLOCK ANY BILLS FROM LEGALIZING POT THIS YEAR. MELISSA HORTMAN HAS SAID SHE HAS DOUBTS ON WHETHER LEGALIZING RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA WILL HAPPEN IN 2019.

6 thoughts on “Sen. Scott Jensen On Legalizing Recreational Marijuana”

  • gingergargoyle says:

    But it's still illegal on a FEDERAL level – so how can the state legalize it?? PLUS legalizing it will NOT prevent street sales – people are still going to try to avoid paying taxes on it

  • William Cunningham says:

    I literally just saw a commercial put on by the state of minnesota on how much smoking costs every tax payer who smokes or not? Now they want to legalize more smoking? This makes no sense?

  • psychosis

    POSTED MARCH 07, 2011, 11:03 AM , UPDATED NOVEMBER 30, 2011, 2:28 PM

    Ann MacDonald
    Contributor, Harvard Health

    Teenagers and young adults who use marijuana may be messing with their heads in ways they don’t intend.
    Evidence is mounting that regular marijuana use increases the chance that a teenager will develop psychosis, a pattern of unusual thoughts or perceptions, such as believing the television is transmitting secret messages. It also increases the risk of developing schizophrenia, a disabling brain disorder that not only causes psychosis, but also problems concentrating and loss of emotional expression.
    In one recent study that followed nearly 2,000 teenagers as they became young adults, young people who smoked marijuana at least five times were twice as likely to have developed psychosis over the next 10 years as those who didn’t smoke pot.
    Another new paper concluded that early marijuana use could actually hasten the onset of psychosis by three years. Those most at risk are youths who already have a mother, father, or sibling with schizophrenia or some other psychotic disorder.
    Young people with a parent or sibling affected by psychosis have a roughly one in 10 chance of developing the condition themselves—even if they never smoke pot. Regular marijuana use, however, doubles their risk—to a one in five chance of becoming psychotic.
    In comparison, youths in families unaffected by psychosis have a 7 in 1,000 chance of developing it. If they smoke pot regularly, the risk doubles, to 14 in 1,000.
    For years, now, experts have been sounding the alarm about a possible link between marijuana use and psychosis. One of the best-known studies followed nearly 50,000 young Swedish soldiers for 15 years. Those who had smoked marijuana at least once were more than twice as likely to develop schizophrenia as those who had never smoked pot. The heaviest users (who said they used marijuana more than 50 times) were six times as likely to develop schizophrenia as the nonsmokers.
    So far, this research shows only an association between smoking pot and developing psychosis or schizophrenia later on. That’s not the same thing as saying that marijuana causes psychosis.
    This is how research works. Years ago, scientists first noted an association between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Only later were they able to figure out exactly how cigarette smoke damaged the lungs and other parts of the body, causing cancer and other diseases.
    The research on marijuana and the brain is at a much earlier stage. We do know that THC, one of the active compounds in marijuana, stimulates the brain and triggers other chemical reactions that contribute to the drug’s psychological and physical effects.
    But it’s not clear how marijuana use might lead to psychosis. One theory is that marijuana may interfere with normal brain development during the teenage years and young adulthood.
    The teenage brain is still a work in progress. Between the teen years and the mid-20s, areas of the brain responsible for judgment and problem solving are still making connections with the emotional centers of the brain. Smoking marijuana may derail this process and so increase a young person’s vulnerability to psychotic thinking. (You can read more about how the adolescent brain develops in this article from the Harvard Mental Health Letter.)
    While the research on marijuana and the mind has not yet connected all the dots, these new studies provide one more reason to caution young people against using marijuana—especially if they have a family member affected by schizophrenia or some other psychotic disorder. Although it may be a tough concept to explain to a teenager, the reward of a short-time high isn’t worth the long-term risk of psychosis or a disabling disorder like schizophrenia.

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