Safe at Home – Little Things

Safe at Home – Little Things


Rick: Hello, folks. Welcome to the show. This is Rick Arndt, Dad,
joined by Caleb, David, Peter, Mary-Elizabeth. They’re giving me a hand
as I give them a hand. I’m building them
a little platform. If you watched
our last show, you saw us make
some real progress. During the
whole half-hour, we accomplished this. [laughing] Now, there was a
lot of preparation. And there’s a
lesson in that. As we walk with God —
He’s into preparation. I mean, when you think
about how long it takes for a seed to germinate
under the ground, and then how long it takes
for the plant to grow and grow until there
finally is fruit, it seems like there’s
more time spent on the preparation than there is
the production of the fruit. But that’s not true. The whole thing is really
preparation for the production of the fruit. The whole process
is important. So what are you doing
down there, David? David: I’m sawing the
branches off my stick. Rick: Good. Just don’t saw yourself. I’m going to make another
board exactly like this. Drum roll. So if it took half an
hour to come up with this, let’s see how long it takes us
to come up with another one. Now, we had to do a lot of
measuring and preparing. We had to pick a tree. We had to kind of
figure out a design for this little platform. And then we found that
we have a very dull saw. So we’re dealing with
a lot of obstacles. We don’t have a
set of sawhorses, so what I’m going to
do is use this bucket. And I’m going to do
this very simply. Caleb: Are you
going to draw it? Rick: Just going to —
yeah — draw a line here, and use this
very dull saw. Ready to go? I could probably use
this end, the back of it, and get just as
much progress, but I guess I’ll
use the front end. Even though it’s dull,
don’t you think I’d better? David: Yeah. Caleb: Probably. David: That’s
what a saw is for. Rick: One of the tricks
is getting it started, especially with
a dull saw. Boy, that has to be one
of the dullest saws. It just seems
to sound dull. Even the noise
it makes is dull. It’s like groaning, “No, I won’t. No, I won’t.” Peter: Do you want
to use that one? Rick: That one’s
probably better. This is some
leftover wood, probably from our
building project out here seven or eight years ago. It was under the shed. And I’m glad
we’re using it. We’re always looking for
lessons on this show, and that’s a lesson. Just like God doesn’t
waste anything — He takes what looks like
accidents and kind of raw, wasted materials within
our lives and weaves it into something good. We’re taking a bunch of
throwaway wood and making something out of it. Boy, it’s getting
bound, guys. Caleb: What? Rick: Oh, that’s —
it binds in there. It’s real dull; plus, it’s kind of
bound in there. Inside, I think the wood
is real wet and juicy. That might be doing it. Caleb: Yay. David: Another. Caleb: I think they’re almost
all exactly the same thing. Rick: Hey, wait a minute. They don’t match. Can you figure out why? Caleb: ‘Cause
this one matches, even though it doesn’t. Oh, it does. Yes. Rick: Anyway, folks, we’re
going to go to a break here. We’ll be right
back after this. Rick: What are you doing? Peter: I want to drive
a screw into a tree. Rick: Drive a screw
into the tree? Peter: Yeah. Rick: Well, this is a — yeah, I think this
tree can take it. It’s been here
for a while. So, we’re waiting
for Caleb. He’s running up to
the house to get some galvanized screws. I’m glad we held out for the
actual galvanized screws. Oh, that’s in reverse. You know how to
put it in — did you know
counterclockwise is reverse and clockwise is
the right way? Peter: Yeah. I don’t really know
how to do that. Rick: There. That thing. Peter: It wasn’t working. Rick: That will
take it out. I’ve done that before. Don’t feel bad. He’s got pretty good
hands for an 11-year-old. Whoops. That’s a little
magnetized, but you have to
hold it a little. But don’t — make sure
you’re not holding it when this thing
turns, naturally. Don’t want to
drill your finger. You want me to help,
or you want to try? Peter: I think I could. Rick: You think you got it? You know what
you could do? Peter: What? Rick: You could just kind
of tap it in with a hammer maybe about an
eighth of an inch, just a little bit. Peter: There’s
a little hole. Rick: Oh, there’s
a little hole? Okay, good. So anyway, Peter’s going to
drill a screw into this — what looks like an elm tree. Oh, you’ve got to
get a straight — I think it’s slanted. You just have to
kind of go straight with the screw, like that. Whoops. There you go. Peter: Hey. Rick: That’s pretty
cumbersome, I know. Peter: It doesn’t work. Rick: So Mary-Elizabeth,
any good pictures so far? Mary-Elizabeth: Yeah. Rick: You want to come
here and let me see? Mary-Elizabeth: Sure. Peter: It doesn’t work. Mary-Elizabeth: I was
looking at the pictures of the Chicago
ball tournament. Rick: Hey, this thing
matches your outfit. Look at that. They’re both shiny. Mary-Elizabeth: And you, too. Rick: Yeah, mine, too. This says it’s shockproof. It says — see
right there? It says “shockproof” —
or “shock- and waterproof.” That means you can’t
upset it, you know? Mary-Elizabeth: [laughing] Rick: What do you think
would be shocking? What would shock
this thing? Let’s see. We’re — you’re not
a very good camera. Hey, it doesn’t
look shocked. Mary-Elizabeth: I know. Rick: No, it’s
a good camera. Mary-Elizabeth: It is. Rick: I was just
pretending. No, it’s very shocking to find such a
shockproof camera. The other day, when
I was crossing the
rocks of this stream, I slipped on a rock, and this flew up in
the air and landed — went really high and
landed — ploop — right into the water. Remember that? David: I know. Rick: And they
fished it out, and it’s been
working fine. So you’ve been getting
some good pictures? Mary-Elizabeth: Yeah. I got some of you
guys being on camera and doing the tree house. Rick: Good. Mary-Elizabeth: I got
your first sawing, too. Rick: The first sawing? Good. Mary-Elizabeth: Yeah. And you holding up
the first cut piece. Rick: Oh, good. Well, I promised the folks
we’d make progress in this, the second of a
two-part series on building a simple,
little platform, and we’ve had challenge
after challenge. For example, now we don’t
have the right kind of galvanized screws. And Caleb is running
up to the house. It’s about 600 feet
away from this stream, brook, babbling brook —
whatever we call it. And he’ll be
coming back soon. I’m looking through the pine
trees to see if he’s coming. And it just shows —
there’s a lesson in everything. But patience — you know,
a big part of life is patience. It’s sort of underrated. We talked earlier about
meekness and the idea that, ironically, even
though the meek aren’t trying to win anything
or inherit anything, they wind up
inheriting the earth. And it’s so true that if
you take care of the basics, the nickel-and-dime stuff — just try to have a pure
heart with the little things, be honest,
win the little battles,
conquer your own sins — the tendency to kind of
compromise, or cut a corner, or to tell a white lie,
or to have a sin of omission — one of the things we’ve
been talking about lately is the danger of
sins of omission — just the idea of
not loving somebody, not being a joyful person,
not rejoicing in the Lord. Oh, I see Caleb coming
through the pine trees with the
galvanized screws. Caleb: Dad, I couldn’t
find any galvanized screws. Rick: You couldn’t? Caleb: No, not long ones. But here’s some galvanized
nails, long ones. I just came back out here
and told Dad that I couldn’t find any galvanized screws
that were roughly this long, so I just got some nails. Rick: Galvanized nails — they’ll work, but I
wanted it to be removable. I think we’d better wait
and get galvanized screws. Can we call James? He’s out and
about, I think. He can go maybe
pick some up for us. You want to use my phone
and just see if he can pick some up for us? In fact, he’s going to a
building supply place today. You’re not going to see a
lot of progress in this show, because we’re
moving very slowly. But this is probably
what God did on purpose. He probably got
us back here, slowed down the pace, had us forget a little —
a few things. And this is enabling me to
just spend time with everybody, and just talk,
and enjoy the trees. And His agenda is a lot
different than what we might have had on our
minds coming out here. Now, if we had come out
here with a Type-A attitude, and smoke coming out
of my ears, and — “We’re going to do this, “and we’re going
to accomplish it. “Get out of my way.” We would have missed
what it’s all about. But the tree house is
secondary to just being out here with my kids on
a beautiful, pre-fall day. Well, we’ll see you around
the corner after this. Rick: Those guys are
getting more fun out of drilling screws into an
elm tree than they are with the whole tree
house operation. Speaking of
the tree house, Caleb ran into the house
and was able to come up with galvanized nails,
but we wanted screws. So we have non-galvanized,
long screws, and we have galvanized nails,
but they’re not screws, and we need a
combination of the two. So we called James, and
he’ll probably be able to pick some up soon. But we’re — right now,
our progress is stopped. But that gives us a good
chance to talk while they have some fun over here. You know, when we first
started doing this show — this show and FamTeam,
our other show — I really felt as if God
put on my heart that — “Don’t be afraid to let
the house, and the land, “and the family
life be the stage. “Don’t ever try
to pump it up. “Let it just be as it is. “Tell it like it is. “Don’t try to be in somebody
else’s echo chamber, “so to speak,
some other form of media, “or into the mainstream,
so to speak. “Just be.” And it’s almost
as if He said, “Stick with the
nickel-and-dime stuff.” And I’m realizing that — by doing that,
first of all, we thought, “Well, we risk the shows
not being very interesting. “Maybe some grandma
somewhere in a rocking “chair who is nuts about
kids and misses her kids “will like the show. “Or somebody with nothing
to do on a rainy day being “driven nuts might
channel-surf, “and land on our channel, and
watch it for a little while.” And you know
what’s amazing? Some of the feedback we get — I can’t resist throwing
these things, by the way. For one, they stop you
from spraining your ankle, and it’s just fun. But you know what
we’re finding? Some of the response that
we get from people — it’s amazing. I mean, kind of cool
people, so to speak, people who wouldn’t darken
the door of a church, people who don’t show
a lot of emotion — I remember one day, a guy
at a sporting goods store, kind of a macho guy, said, “You know, I watch your show. “And the other day, you
were just talking about “drywall for 10 minutes. “And I thought to myself, “‘I can’t change the channel. “‘This is fascinating.’ “I don’t know
what does it.” Almost like he was
kind of mad at himself. And I wonder,
too, what is it. And we talked in one of
our previous shows about the Softball Classic. Ah, there’s another one. I think that might
be a buckeye. We talked about the
Softball Classic and the fact that its elements
are so simple. It’s a city park. It’s our team playing
a triple-header. But people have
been coming — a group every year
comes from out of town. We usually get a handful of
people from various states, and sometimes
other countries. And the local people, even
people who have been in the Major Leagues, remark
how special it is — and there’s just
something about it. Words — “surreal” was used by
one guy at a major media outlet. I wonder what it is, too,
and I really think — if you look at the
actual elements of it, it’s so simple,
and yet it’s God. We really — and I talked
about this previously, so forgive me if I’m repetitive
from previous shows — but we just constantly are
asking for His presence, and He brings
everything alive. And it’s just fun doing
ordinary things with Him. Look at this. It’s some kind of fruit
or something, Peter. I don’t know what that is. David: What? Rick: Oh, just some
sort of fruit. I thought it was going
to be a seed in there, but instead it’s a
fruit or something. Mary-Elizabeth: A crabapple? Rick: No, I don’t think
it’s a crabapple. Now, I think these things — hey, you guys might
want to saw this open. This is — there might
be a buckeye in there. When I was young,
we loved buckeyes. David: Can I see it? Rick: Yeah. Now, don’t cut
your hand, though. You might —
why don’t you take a hammer and pound it open
or something? Peter: Do you have a nail? Rick: Nails? You can go ahead. Here, you could
take the nails. There’s somebody coming back
here with a four-wheeler. I don’t know if
that’s James. Is he delivering the
nails or something? So what’s up, James? Hey, what’s up? James: Caleb
was calling me. Rick: Oh, about
galvanized screws? James: Yeah. What do you guys
have out here? Rick: We just have
non-galvanized. So James is — usually — he usually knows about
what’s on the premises — nails, screws,
pieces of wood, tools. He’s always been
involved in tools and kind of keeps
track of things. If we don’t
have it, James, I told them we’ll be
patient and do it right. James: We should have
the green-coated ones. I don’t — Caleb, did
you find any green ones? Caleb: No. I found the little, green —
grayish-green ones. James: We should have
three-inch, long ones. Rick: Okay, good. If you can find those,
I’ll use them. Anyway, as I close
out this segment, I just wanted to encourage
you that even Jesus — and again, some of these
themes are so simple, I almost have
to apologize. We bring them up
in show after show. But it’s true. Look at the Gospels. Jesus spent most of His
times dealing with one person at a time. And He could have
come in a media age. He could have had His own
show, as we often say. Why did He come then? There weren’t
even newspapers. And it’s just one
person at a time. It shows the preciousness
of one life at a time, the way Jesus handled it. I think it’s about
time to go to a break. We’ll wrap things up
in the final segment. Rick: Hey, welcome
back to the show. And it looks like
our attempt to build the
tree platform has been — hit another delay. James is going to run
back to the house. And you’ll see him. Forgive the noise
in the background. He’s heading off into
the pine trees, and — just a minute. He said this has
some juice in it. I’m going to see
what’s in it. Let’s check this out. Oh, man, my knees are sore
from those double-header — ready? We played eight ballgames
the other night — other day. Wasn’t that something? Eight — what do you
think was tougher — playing eight softball games
in one day or watching them? Mary-Elizabeth: Well, it was
very, very intense to watch. It was very scary on the
Chicago ball tournament, ’cause we could have
gotten knocked out anytime. Rick: I know. And we were down, and
we had to win five games straight not to get
eliminated, didn’t we? Mary-Elizabeth: Yeah. And we — if we just
messed up at all, we would lose
the whole thing. Rick: I know. Mary-Elizabeth:
It was so scary. Rick: Here goes. Ready? One, two, three. Let’s find the treasure
in the middle of it. David: Is there any
treasure in the middle of it? Rick: Somewhere in this mud and
slime is a walnut, I think. Mary-Elizabeth: A walnut? Rick: I think it is. I should have known that. We had one of these
at our other house. I think this was a —
is a walnut. David: Can I —
I’ll open this one. Mary-Elizabeth:
We could eat walnuts. Rick: Yeah. They’re edible. David: I’ll open this one. Mary-Elizabeth:
They’re probably not very
clean right now, though. Rick: No. You need to wash this off. But yeah, you may as
well wash these off, take it into the house. Maybe somebody
will like them. But I’ll talk
to the folks. You guys can —
just watch out, David. Don’t hit anybody, okay? We’ll come over here, and
I’ll talk to Jude for a while. But when we decided to
do Safe at Home and — this show,
we decided to keep it real. There’s always the
temptation to liven it up, so to speak,
but we have found by — in this day and age,
the thing that’s missing is the ingredient that we’re trying
to stick with on this show, just ordinary, real bread. And some people, especially
in the media competition, with all the fancy graphics, and one thing being more
dramatic than the other, and headlines,
and this and that — and you kind of get — you kind of think
something like this is — well, this is too innocent. This is too irrelevant. But this is where
the real strength is. Because if you can sink
your roots down in Him and build relationships
with others, too, really, what can
knock you over? If you’re trusting that
He’s your provision financially and
every other way, and that He’s the one
you go to for everything, and that He knows the
future, He knows the past, He knows the
present, He cares, He knows everything that’s
going on in the world now, He has the power to
do something about it, why would you have to do a
whole lot with your own brain? Now, some people can then
underestimate you, since — because you’re trusting Him, that you’ve kind
of checked out, and you aren’t sharp
intellectually. But the opposite is true. You can use your mind for
the things that really count if you’re not
stressed out as much. And we all
still are human. But if you’re not as stressed
out with worry and anxiety, and trying to do it yourself,
or manipulating things, the true colors and
flavor of a person’s personality then can
come out, you know? And it also is less
stressful in terms of just aging and wear and tear. You know, people always
tell Cathy that she looks so youthful and has
a spring in her step, and they think
it’s all genetics. But she has
really cultivated, from the time I first met
her 38-plus years ago, this attitude of
joy and energy. We really committed
ourselves, when we were young,
to remain young, and to stay joyful,
and never become cynical, and never to
become hardened. The biggest temptation
is that we become — in a sense, the worst thing
that can happen to someone is that you grow up, so to
speak, and become cynical. As you come closer to God,
and surrender to Him, and ask Jesus
into your heart, you become more like a
child, but ironically, the things that matter in this
world become more successful. Our businesses
have stayed strong, even through
the recession. Relationships with others — things just
seeming to happen. Even our ball team —
we keep winning games. And we see our faults. We keep making mistakes. Last night, against a very
good team, we’re down — 14 to 7, was it, Jude? And we came back and tied
it in our last inning — in the last inning. Almost won it in the
bottom of the seventh. So the other team bats
in the top of the eighth, which is extra
innings in our league. We held them scoreless. We come up in the
bottom of that inning, and guess who —
guess what? “The meek shall
inherit the earth.” Our youngest
player, Nathan, who’s a relative rookie, even though he’s been
playing two or three years, gets up there and hits a
base hit up the middle and wins the game. Well, anyway, it looks
like we ran out of time. And just now, James came
back with the actual galvanized screws. That’s the irony of it. Most of the time when
the camera was rolling, we didn’t have the right
screws and didn’t — things didn’t work
out exactly right. But again, maybe that was the
theme God wanted to show us — is that in our lives,
80 percent of the time, something goes not
according to plan. And you can still react
to it and adjust to it, because if your whole goal is
simply to flow in Him anyway, then no moment is wasted, because everything is a
potential way to love God. Even showing patience and
honoring Him that way, imitating Jesus as He was
when He went to the cross, showing that kind
of forbearance, and patience,
and sweetness of spirit — that’s a way of loving God. If you have to
wait in line — so you know, nothing’s really
wasted when you’re with Him. But we are ready to go
back to the tree house, and ironically, about ready
to say goodbye to you. But you get the drift
of what we’re doing. Maybe in a future show, I’ll
show you what we came up with. Check out FamTeam.com. And we’ll see you later.

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