Peru Travel Vlog (Machu Picchu and Guinea Pigs For Food!) – Rozz Recommends: Unexplored EP2

Peru Travel Vlog (Machu Picchu and Guinea Pigs For Food!) – Rozz Recommends: Unexplored EP2


Hey what’s up? This is Rozz. I’m in Lima in Peru, took me a long while to get here, fly from Singapore, transit in Tokyo
en route to Los Angeles, took me like 10 hours to get to Lima in Peru. This is probably the longest time I’ve ever
taken to get to any place in the world. I’m waiting to board my flight to Cusco and from there I will begin the main adventure and that is to the Machu Picchu. Cusco pretty much lies at a
pretty high altitude of 3399 metres, so flying into here you’re pretty much
flying straight into high altitude. Now there many ways to combat altitude sickness and one of them, believed by the
locals, is to consume coca leaf tea. Coca leaf is pretty much the leaf
upon which cocaine is made from but the quantities are so nominal that
you don’t even get the effect of cocaine so it’s 100% safe to drink. So the hotel I live in has
free flow coca tea at the lobby. All right. So I’m on the way to the sacred valley, this is my ride for the day. Hello. That’s Wilson. Wilson Waracha. Waracha. Weather’s looking pretty good,
not taking any chances though. I am totally wearing my rain gaiters for my boots because there’s nothing worse than
walking around with wet shoes and socks. I’ve got my Gore-Tex armed so… all good. So as you see behind me… is the city of Cusco in Peru. It’s so quaint, look at that. So I’m in a quaint little village of Chinchero right now. This village is often overlooked by
people traveling to the Sacred Valley but I think it’s worth a stopover. Here in Peru, they eat guinea pigs. And my guide says they’re very
delicious with very low cholesterol and they’re going apeshit right now. Oh my god! Don’t get so fed because you’re gonna be eaten. One thing I love about Peru is its diversity in ingredients. There are like, how many different kinds of potatoes? About 3,000 types? And this is like, probably
the weirdest potato I’ve ever seen. It looks like… when you don’t
have enough fluid in your system and your shit comes out lumpy. And also like, the different kinds of corn as well. This is an alpaca and here’s another one, he’s a bit shy… Hey… There’re like, all these wools for sale and a lot of woven fabrics here so if you’re interested to
take home a souvenir this is the spot. This is a dying ceremony happening right now. The Peruvians are excellent at
making dyes and embroidery and cloth and all these dyes are natural. Whatever you see next to the yarn
is where the color was from. So I just discovered in the village
in Chinchero nobody has gray hair because of this root called saqta
and saqta is a natural detergent, you can use it to wash anything including your hair and she says she has got no gray hair because of saqta. Look at how beautiful she is! It’s a natural shampoo. It’s an Inca shampoo. This is what the shampoo looks like. Inca shampoo. And this is what you wash the wool with? Yeah. And the alpaca is very dirty because they don’t ever take a shower. So do you wash all the hair? Look at that, before and after. Wow! Oh my god the shampoo works. So I’m checking out some weaving techniques. It’s amazing that these women
weave the patterns by memory and these patterns are passed down
from generation to generation and they use a certain weaving tool, this bone. So can you guess what bone this is? I thought it was llama or maybe alpaca but it’s… Guys, it’s human bones. So the question now is – whose bone was it? It’s human bone, it’s a tourist who didn’t buy anything. Bone of a tourist who didn’t buy anything. Okay I better fucking buy something here. Great sense of humor you have. …I’m scared! Llama bone? Oh man, she lied to me. It’s actually llama bone. Here I am in the Sacred Valley, that’s the Andean Mountain range behind me. Now the thing about the Sacred Valley is there’re so many ruins to check out. I, for one, am not too bothered and I feel like unless you’re
doing a documentary on ruins or you have the strange… connection
or desire to… be around old buildings, I say, you don’t quite have to do every single ruin. To get to the Sacred Valley there are a few ways. Now if you’re on a budget, of course
you can take a public bus from Cusco and then when you get to the Sacred Valley
you can kind of book a local taxi, which is way cheaper. I don’t have much time here so
I’ve opted to book a private taxi. Now this is way cheaper than a private tour, what you get is basically a car and a driver, they’re gonna take you all around, like where you wanna go and then along the way you see
beautiful… scenery like this one. It’s unreal. So I’m here at the Maras Salt Mine, it’s all brown like Milo and this is pretty much what
happens during the rainy months because the rain pretty much
beat down on the salt ponds causing the mud to kind of stir up and create this brown color. But if you come here during a dry season
this whole plain… will be white, which is kind of beautiful but I also see beauty in this. Now this is a very ancient method of mining for salt, pretty much like tiny little pools of
salted water are left to evaporate, leaving behind only salt. As you can see some of the ponds have salt in them, this is pretty much… how the
Incas did it back in those days. So the Maras Salt Mines are a bit of an
off-the-beaten-path location, so there’re not as many tourists here
as all the other popular ruins. You can totally get a shot
without anyone in the background. You know what? It’s so unnecessary to book a tour, to do the salt mines. If you come here and you stick
close enough to a tour group, you can hear everything. Okay! It’s a really windy day! I’m here at Moray, as you can see behind me the terraces it’s like a shape of a bowl and pretty much modeled like a
Roman Coliseum with all the steps. Now, it is believed that the Incas used this site as an agricultural experimentation lab of sorts. From the top to the bottom, there’s a drop of temperature of 15°C. Now because of the drop in micro temperatures, the Incas could use different levels
to test out vegetation and how they grow …at different altitudes. Pretty ingenious if you ask me. So Instagramable. All right. I’m here at San Pedro Market and… the start of my food tour
and I’m walking down a juice aisle. Now, the juices here are pretty unique because they really blend all sorts of fruits. We’re not talking about the basic 3 or 5 fruits
that you get in your blended stuff, you get all that. So behind me is the chorizo counter, they make it fresh every
morning with all the fresh spices and then stuff it into sausages. You can’t get any fresher than that. Oh my god it smells so good! For those of you who are fans of alpaca, I have some news for you. This right here is a very delicious snack, known as alpaca jerky. Some Peruvian fruits here. This is closely relate it to the
custard apple but it’s not. So we’re just casually strolling through the food section when I got introduced to a cactus that people drink here to get high. I’m here at the Wanchaq Bus Station, it’s really cold right now, it’s about 10°C but I’ve got my gear on so I’m good. So first you take a bus from the Wanchaq Station, that’s about an hour 40 minutes
to the train station in Ollantaytambo. And then you take another one and
a half hour train ride to Machu Picchu. So we’ve just arrived at Ollantaytambo Station, my train only arrives at 9.15am so I’m gonna take a walk around
this town and see what’s happening. I’m gonna enjoy a local breakfast. Yes! A piping hot bowl of chicken noodle soup. I believe this chicken noodle soup is influenced by the people from China who came to Peru as slaves. I’m gonna be adding some lime and some chilli. Ooh. Spotted a strand of hair but it’s okay. This is like a hug in a bowl. Nothing like a bowl of hot
noodle soup in a cold morning. It’s about 8°C right here and I’m so happy. So I just boarded the train. Machu Picchu is about one and a half hours away, I got myself a window seat, no one seated right next to me so I have more legroom. Score! This is pretty dope because you get
an almost 180° view of the landscapes as we travel to Machu Picchu. Okay. I rejoiced too soon. The train is moving backwards, I’m
sitting the wrong way around. I hope I don’t vomit because
this is still one and a half hour ride. All right guys… the Machu Picchu. A sacred stone city perched high up in the mountains between two tall Andean peaks. Why the Inca built it, and why did they hurriedly abandon it? Nobody knows. There’re over 150 structures here.
Homes, food storage units, temples… This is superbly well-preserved despite having been forgotten for 500 years. This whole area has been extremely well planned out, there’s a superb irrigation system so
this whole place never ever floods. The structure still stands because it’s got very deep foundations. The Inca is just brilliant, can I just put it that way? Despite not having much knowledge of like, steel and wheels and all that, they
managed to cut up all these rocks… …to build the city! I will give up! Look at this irrigation system. This was built by the Incas. It is still working to this day, channeling water from the mountains… …towards the crop except that there are no crops now. This is the Sun Temple. All the temples built in the
name of the Sun during the Inca Empire are all round because the Sun is round. Can you see that chinchilla at
the window of the Sun temple? No one’s allowed in there but this guy is a rebel. So apparently chinchillas are wild,
they’re very common here. So you can kind of like tell
your status in the hierarchy of things by the kind of structures you live in. The peasants and the commoners
who live in structures built with rock that’s a bit odd-shaped whereas the nobles and the temples built
for gods would have structures like this. It’s just like evenly cut stones, perfectly fitted with each other, that’s how you know… you are It. Wow look at it! Wildlife. Here at Machu Picchu also you’re done you can get your passport stamped…
with a Machu Picchu chop. Yeah! I’ve officially been here. If you want to take the classic photos
of Machu Picchu like you see on the internet, the only place to do that is from
the vantage point at the guard house. I had grand plans of doing one of
the few easier hikes around the citadel, like to the Sun Gate, but you know what? The altitude… is giving me a shortness of breath. I’m struggling just making it to the guardhouse and that’s nowhere near the
foot of the Sun Gate so I think I’m just gonna stick to this path… and… just make it up in one piece, alive? Let’s go. I’m not even tired, I’m just breathless. Oh my god… At last… I get to the first viewing platform. The past nine to ten days in Peru have been a blast. I’ve been so moved by the landscape and the spirit of Peru, I don’t know, there’s just something
so magical about this place. The people, the food, surprisingly, the food was amazing. I had the privilege of dining at Central. Central is number four on the
list of World’s 50 Best Restaurants. I had a ceviche overload in local ceviche shops and even took up a cooking class to
learn how to make some Peruvian dishes. I don’t know man, I love this place so much
that I am ranking it right up there next to Iceland. That’s one of my favourite places in the world. As I was rolling through traveling
between places on buses, trains and planes, I just got a bit emo, you know? Tears would just stream down my face
and I just cannot stop crying and it’s quite embarrassing and
I was a bit self-conscious because I’m travelling alone and people might just
be looking at me wondering why is this… solo traveler, this girl, crying. But I guess I was just so overwhelmed by everything. I traveled a long way, both
literally and figuratively, to get here. It took me 32 hours and many plane rides to get here but it also took me 17 years
to get out of my comfort zone. We all overcome challenges in our own ways. Some people conquer mountains, save lives, better the world. As for me, the challenges I’ve overcome
have more to do with personal growth and learning to love myself. I think this is something that
not many people do enough of? I came across this quote that said hey, one day you’re gonna be dead,
way longer than you’ve ever been alive and that woke me up. I was like, okay. I have to start living my life for me, on my terms. So I barely scraped the surface of what
Peru has to offer in the mere 10 days that I was here but I’ll definitely be back. But for now though, onward to Bolivia. I’ll see you there!

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