Our Community: Adaptive Climbing

Our Community: Adaptive Climbing


[MUSIC PLAYING] DONOVAN TILDESLEY: My
name is Donovan Tildesley. I’m 34. I’m from Vancouver. I’m actually, I guess,
a lifelong athlete. MAN: Yeah. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: At
the start of the climb, it felt rather impossible– Yii! TONY: I got you. I got you. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
It’s all about feel, climbing as a blind person. So it’s really like a
combination of me figuring out what’s on the wall, how to get
around it, how to get up it. TONY: You got this. Nice. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
And instruction from below as to how
to do these things. [MUSIC PLAYING] BRENT GOODMAN: Climbing is
one of those things that requires work. It’s not a passive– It’s a very active sport. My name is Brent Goodman. I’m the Executive Director
of Canadian Adaptive Climbing Society. Come climb in Squamish. Just making climbing
possible for them is kind of what it’s about, right? And really just sharing
the magic of climbing. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Woo! NARRATOR: These
are the stories– MAN 1: There is a
foundation out there that helps you get back into it. NARRATOR: –about organizations
making a difference– MAN 2: What really limits
our ability to do something is people’s imagination. NARRATOR: –and empowering
others across Canada. MAN 3: When I get into
that sledge, I’m free, man. I’m playing hockey. WOMAN 1: It’s a
great organization, and it’s worth supporting. NARRATOR: In “Our Community.” [MUSIC PLAYING] PAULO GUERRERO: My
name is Paulo Guerrero. I’ve been in a wheelchair
for 10 months now and I try to make
the most of it. I moved out a few
years ago when I was 17 and actually
going myself, working and doing everything. I’m blessed I live here. I have ramps everywhere. I was an arborist. I was a tree faller. I liked the danger. You had to climb these 70 foot
trees with like a handsaw. You’re swinging around. It feels like you’re going
to fall over half the time. I was pretty outgoing. Pretty fearless. Willing to try anything. I did a lot of biking,
off-road biking. I really liked racing
them, but that’s what led to the
accident, as well. I was on my
motorcycle one night. I was riding home
and I lost control on a pothole and my bike went
up out from underneath me and I rolled off
like 70 feet and hit a parked car with my back. It broke my ribs, my neck,
and my back, my shoulder, and my arm. And then I remember
sitting on the road and I was trying to sit
up, and I was like [BLEEP].. I can’t feel my legs. And then, yeah,
once people came, they called the ambulance,
paramedics, police. Everybody came. It wasn’t good, you know. You worry about
things like that. Like if I’m in a
chair, how am I going to teach my kid how to
walk or ride a bike? When you go from such a
life where everything’s free and you can do whatever you
want to being so constrainted, it’s kind of sad. It brings you down. I went to rehab for two months
after that at GF Strong. It was hard because
they try and make you do everything yourself. I had to learn how to go to the
bathroom, get up, get changed. Just simple, simple,
like kid tasks. I felt like I was
going to be limited, but I knew after some time,
I’d be able to get used to it. I left rehab and I went
to my sister’s house, but it was super hard. It’s like a super
small apartment. Super not wheelchair friendly. So I came to my parents’. At the time, I didn’t
really know what I wanted, but I knew I wanted to
do something a little bit different than everyone
else, so I took my own path and I wanted to do
sports, so I found sports. That’s when I found
on Instagram, like, what other people were doing. That’s when I met Scott. He does a lot of water skiing
and he goes to the gym a lot. He was cliff diving. He was hanging on
bridges and stuff. It was super cool. He just showed me that just
because you’re in a wheelchair doesn’t mean you’re disabled. You can still go do things. [MUSIC PLAYING] I get on the ground,
lie down there, and my friend picks
up my legs and we just start walking on my
hands like a wheelbarrow. We’re going to trek the river. We’re going to go down a
little bit, climb up a log, go up the bank, and see
where we go from there. You can have a cool
off-road wheelchair, but it won’t be as able as you
with your arms and a friend. Because when you look
at people in wheelchairs especially at our
age you’re like, oh, they can’t do anything. You know, they’re
not normal people. Everything’s harder, which
is true, it really is. But you can still go
do things and just because you’re in a wheelchair
doesn’t mean you’re disabled. It’s not. Like there’s not
something wrong with you. You can go out and you can
live your best life stuff. I ought to be able to bring
things closer for other people in wheelchairs to have their
possibilities be bigger. There’s a lot of
people that haven’t done these kinds of things. Scott’s the only
other person I know that does this walking
on his hands thing. So if I do it here,
my goal is to show other people in wheelchairs that
you can still go out, have fun. You just need a couple
good friends and that’s it. I started Instagram
because my sister told me to get it started,
try and make money. But then at the
end, it was really cool to document
sort of each step after getting in a wheelchair,
and it was really easy to look back at things
and see the changes and how I’ve improved. Super cool being involved
with the community and getting a chance
to share my story to help other people, as well. Oh, I’m feeling great. Ready to go to the
gym after this, too. I want to keep
training for a while and be able to push myself to do
the hikes in North Van and West Van, because I don’t think
nobody else has done them in a wheelchair yet. So I think it’d be
cool to set that staple and show you’re really
attached to what you love, and don’t let nobody
tell you you can’t do it. [DOOR SLAMS] NARRATOR: “Our Community”
will return after the break. [MUSIC PLAYING] We now return to
“Our Community.” [MUSIC PLAYING] PAULO GUERRERO: At
the gym right now. Feral Strength. Working out. Having a good time. Right now I’m on the racing
team and the skiing team, but I’m trying to make the
rowing team, as well, Vancouver Rowing Team, because I think
that’d be really, really fun. The goal for in a
couple of years, just to get to a national level so I
can start competing for Canada and see where that takes me. CONLAN MANSFIELD: How
you doing today, Paolo? PAULO GUERRERO: Good. How are you? CONLAN MANSFIELD:
I’m doing great, man. I’m ready to bench with you. I’m Conlan Mansfield and I run
this gym called Feral Strength. I’m here working with
my buddy Paolo today. So I’m just going to
take these straps. We’re going to strap
you on the bench. It’s going to keep you stable. PAULO GUERRERO: Oh. CONLAN MANSFIELD: Are you
feeling nice and recovered for our session today? PAULO GUERRERO: Oh, very. CONLAN MANSFIELD: Awesome. You’re good to go. Why don’t you hit this for
a good set of five, my man. PAULO GUERRERO: Sports
is a little bit better because I think it revolves
around a community of people that’s already in wheelchairs. CONLAN MANSFIELD: Last two. PAULO GUERRERO: So I
think that’s a huge help. CONLAN MANSFIELD: Rest. Finish it. Excellent. Well done, sir. PAULO GUERRERO: Now, I’m feeling
the walking on the river. CONLAN MANSFIELD: We’ll take
care of these for you, bud. You want a hand up? PAULO GUERRERO:
You got to get over that big hurdle of like
going out and knowing you’re going to be in people’s way. Knowing that people are going
to have to do stuff for you. CONLAN MANSFIELD: Good man. Yes. Excellent. PAULO GUERRERO: And it’s
a really easy reason to stay inside. CONLAN MANSFIELD: I made
you do all that bench and then you’ve got to dip to
just get back the chair, man. You’re a champion. [MUSIC PLAYING] Awesome, man. PAULO GUERRERO: But, yeah,
I think with hard work, anything’s possible and that’s
kind of what I’m going for. CONLAN MANSFIELD: So like we
were talking about last time, let’s do that ladder,
the pull-up ladder, where we do first
one as many reps as you can do with
really good, clean form and I’ll just stabilize
your feet for you. Some raises. All right, let’s do it. Letting go. PAULO GUERRERO: It’s easy
to muscle through things, but once you got to start
messing with technique, everything gets a lot harder. And to get technique
down is the hard part of almost every sport. CONLAN MANSFIELD: I got you. One arm hanging. I got you. So are we going to do some rows? PAULO GUERRERO: Sure. CONLAN MANSFIELD: Awesome. Let’s do rows. So let’s go first set,
if you’re game, Paolo. Let’s just rep it
out, do max reps. See how many you can
get up to 15, OK? PAULO GUERRERO: Well, everyone’s
tried rock climbing before. CONLAN MANSFIELD: Let’s rep. PAULO GUERRERO: STI
messaged me and they said if I want to go to the
aviary at UBC to try it. CONLAN MANSFIELD: You’ve
got at least five. PAULO GUERRERO: I
think turning down an opportunity with
something that you haven’t tried before is a mistake. CONLAN MANSFIELD: You’re done. You tapped out. PAULO GUERRERO: And then I went
there and it was really fun. Should I do push ups? CONLAN MANSFIELD: Yeah, man. Do you want to do some push ups? PAULO GUERRERO: Yeah. [CHATTER] I think it’s a huge benefit for
me showing people what you can do as someone in a wheelchair. I love it when I’m
dead after a workout. It’s a good place to cool down. [MUSIC PLAYING] DONOVAN TILDESLEY: My
name is Donovan Tildesley. I’m 35 years old
from Vancouver, BC. Completely blind since
birth, so I’ve grown up my entire life not seeing. Thankfully, I have
wonderful parents who have exposed me to
anything and everything that somebody with sight
would be able to do. From the age of
six months, I was in the water, which
graduated to swim lessons, and then to racing my dad back
and forth across the pool. I was always a kid– always a person who liked
to be in motion and I always liked an adrenaline rush. I am in lane 2 at
the Arbutus Club, my usual lane where I’d swim
three to four mornings a week. I’ve been at this club
for many, many years. My parents joined in 1990. I’ve basically had the
same lane in this pool for the past almost 20 years. The summer I was turning 12,
1996, and I’m off to Kamloops for my first ever
provincial championship. At that competition, I met
a couple of people who were travelling to Atlanta
that summer to compete in the Paralympic Games. It made me wonder
at the time one day, I might make it to
the Paralympics. This is where my
dad came forward and a former swimmer
himself told me, I know you want to
get to the Paralympics and I’m willing to
help you to get there, and I think we have a
good chance at making the Sydney, Australia team. And so I agreed and began
a pretty amazing journey. The following June, I found
out that I had made the team to go to Sydney to represent
my country in the Paralympics Games. I had never ever been
more nervous in my life. Before I knew it I was
behind the blocks and bang, the gun goes off and
I started swimming. It all came together. I was like in this
rhythm, this flow. I get to the end of the
pool, and the first question I asked the attendant
at the side of the pool was, well, what
place did I come in? And she says third. I couldn’t believe that
this skinny, blind kid from Vancouver had made
it standing on the podium. And this medal just wasn’t for
me, this was for my country. I’d achieved a lot of success
and from there, the success just kept growing
with three more trips to the Paralympics– two
silvers and a bronze in Athens, bronze medal in Beijing,
multiple gold medals at World Championships along the way. And the other highlight
was carrying the flag into the bird’s nest in Beijing. I’m a blind swimmer. I’d like to be walking
in with my cane and, obviously, I’m going
to need the support. But I think it says
something to show the cane and this is how I get around. And that was a pretty
big deal for me and I enjoyed the experience. Dad’s key line was always,
the joy is in the journey. COMPUTER VOICE: Message
received from [INAUDIBLE].. How’s it going, man? Just wondering if
you are planning to come up for Brent’s
Adaptive Climbing Day this Saturday in Squamish. 7:27 PM. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Reply. COMPUTER VOICE: What
do you want to say? DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Hey Tony,
comma, yes, exclamation mark. Super stoked for climbing
on Sunday, exclamation mark. Are you able to pick me
up at 7:45 question mark. Looking forward to sharing
the ride up with you, exclamation mark. COMPUTER VOICE: Your message to
Antonio Franco says, Hey Tony. Yes. I am super stoked for
climbing this weekend. Are you able to pick me
up Sunday morning at 7:45? Looking forward to
sharing the ride with you. Ready to send it? DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Yeah. COMPUTER VOICE: OK. [DOOR SHUTS] [MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: “Our Community”
will return after the break. We now return to
“Our Community.” [MUSIC PLAYING] [BIRDS SINGING] BRENT GOODMAN: My
name is Brent Goodman. I’m the Executive Director
of Canadian Adaptive Climbing Society. We have four participants
coming here in Squamish. Yeah, so the difference
between indoor climbing and outdoor climbing
is that we still have to bring our own ropes. We have to set it up, as
opposed to in the climbing gym, you just show up. There’s ropes already hanging. Yeah, we’re doing the work. So we’ve got Stephen helping
me, who’s a coworker of mine. We’re just setting
up, basically, three top ropes but one of
them has that counterweight which takes away
some of the weight and makes it a little bit
easier to get up the climb. Yeah, so there’s two bolts. Basically, I attach a
carabiner to each of them and then I attach webbing
to each of those carabiners and then I equalize
the end with two. The whole system of
climbing is to try to build as much redundancy as we can. Anyway, long story short, the
top of the climb is super safe. All we’re going to
do is drop it down and then we’ll be ready
to climb, actually, and then we’re
going to go and meet all of the people that are
climbing with us today. [MUSIC PLAYING] I think that the formulation of
the idea, kind of observation, I just started looking
around and seeing that there’s basically no
adaptive climbing basically in the whole country,
nothing in British Columbia. And just being where
I am in Squamish, it’s such a great
place to innovate. And I would expect that there
would be a service like that if something happened to me
and I get in an accident. I would love to have someone
that I could call and say, hey, I want to keep
climbing, you know. As soon as you get a
really high quality program with really
great people, that just want to come in and
enjoy each other’s company and support each
other, it makes me think about what we’re
going to do next, how far we’re going
to push people, how big the adventure should be. But, ultimately, it would
be great to have people come in, be a part
of our community that actually don’t need
us to go rock climbing. That would be fantastic. When we get together like
this, it’s a good reminder that it’s not
about me, it’s just about creating that
space for people. I’m really excited for today. For me, it’s not about like
crushing the rock, necessarily, but just like taking care of
each other and making sure everyone’s safe. I’m going to do quick intros. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: I’m Donovan. This is, I guess, my
first climb of the year, and I came to have a good
time and get back on the rock. TONY: I’m Tony. I’m a volunteer. I’ve been working with Brent
for three years and every time I come out, I’m surprised
to learn something new and hang out with
really cool people. [MUSIC PLAYING] DONOVAN TILDESLEY: We’re
just setting up here. Got the harness on. Got the shoes on. Tony’s just helping me make
sure that my helmet fits snugly. And then once we
do that, it will be time to get on the rock. I’m just at the base of the
rock and we’re all strapped in. TONY: All right. So hold on. I’m just going to clip in. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
Am I [INAUDIBLE]?? TONY: You’re on [INAUDIBLE]. You’re ready to go. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Climbing. TONY: Climb on. See what you can do. Nice, dude. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: For me
climbing is all about feel. TONY: Up. There you go. Good job. Perfect. Left foot. There you go. Now, twist. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Climbing,
not having the visual. It’s all about my
relationship to the rock. TONY: Nice, dude. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: How I
interact with it with my hands, with my feet. TONY: Nice. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
The first time I climbed with open cracks. I remember that being
a bit of a struggle. Oh. TONY: I got you. I got you. I got you. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
Also, some degree of communication with the guide. So Tony, who will be
belaying me today, will likely be giving
me instructions. TONY: Get that foot on. Get that foot on. There you go. You got it. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Letting
me know if I’m stuck. TONY: Feel it out. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
Where to kind of aim for for the next
handhold or foothold. TONY: So this is going
to be the tough part. This is going to
be a weird spot. You’re going to
have to keep tight. There you go, dude. Keep going. That’s it. He’s crushing it. He’s like absolutely
crushing this crack. Well, cracks are
really hard to climb. It takes quite a lot
of forearm strength and he’s using his
feet really well. So get your right
knee– right foot where your right knee is, Donny. Twist. Yeah. Keep to your right. That’s great, dude. OK. And reach to your right. That’s you, dude. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
That’s– I’m at the top? TONY: That’s it. You ready to lower? DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Yeah. TONY: All right. Lean back. You know what to do. Walk it out. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: (SINGING)
I believe I can fly. I believe I can touch the sky. TONY: Every time. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
(SINGING) Think about it every night and day. Spread my wings and fly away. TONY: “I Believe I Can Fly.” It’s his theme song. All right. That’s the ground. Whew. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Oh, boy. I just climbed a
pretty difficult crack. Well, A, it’s the
first time I’ve climbed in five months and
B, that was fairly technical. This rock definitely
has several plateaus and, yeah, once I got to the
top, it felt really good. It felt like a sense
of accomplishment. [MUSIC PLAYING] BRENT GOODMAN: Hey, fella. PAULO GUERRERO: Good
to see you, Brent. BRENT GOODMAN:
You’re in good hands. You basically just have
to throw a harness on and then you can
try this corner. PAULO GUERRERO: As soon as
I pulled up to the rock, I was like [BLEEP]. This is going to be hard. It’s always humbling because
you got to put everything aside and you realize
how big the rock is and how small you really are. Deceptively high though, right,
because once you get up there, it gets harder and harder. I’m going to climb
up this thing. It’s going to be wild. I just thought it’s a cool way
to show what you can really do when you’re still in
a chair, because it’s totally kind of against what
you’d think of what you can do. Chainsaw chaps. Go to my waist, around my legs. Get it all strapped in. It protects me from the rock. BRIANNA: Shall we
get you tied in? PAULO GUERRERO: Yeah, sure. BRIANNA: All right. I’m Brianna and I’m from
Victoria in Australia. I came to see how things work
and meet some cool people. So we’re just going to clip
this white rope through the two white slips and this
is going to help as acting as a counterweight,
taking some of his weight off as he climbs and
stopping him falling back down after he’s pulled up. I’m just going to check
that your knot’s done up, and then that this
carabiner is going to hold. So you’re all good to climb. [MUSIC PLAYING] [CHATTER] Yeah, you got it. PAULO GUERRERO: Oh, great. Now, we’re stopped. BRIANNA: So can you reach into
the crack at the other end? So get your hands in the
crack and try making a fist. PAULO GUERRERO: We came
here, we were like looking for the coloured handholds
everywhere, but there’s none. You get your hands in creases. You have to sort of flex a
little bit to try and get in the right position. You have to pull your leg up
to try and put it on a rock. It’s a whole different
aspect of things that you have to do that
I didn’t think about. BRIANNA: Out to the left, yeah. Yeah, awesome. [MUSIC PLAYING] PAULO GUERRERO:
Something else, man. I’m telling you. It’s not even that I don’t have
legs, I just have dead weight. BRENT GOODMAN: Well, I’m just
providing a counterweight for Paolo’s dead weight that
he’s pulling himself up on and that is attached to the rope
that comes back down to Paolo. PAULO GUERRERO: Oh, Brent, this
is a serious upper body work. Let me tell you. BRENT GOODMAN: Nice. Nice. Nice, dude. Nice. You got it now. [CHATTER] [MUSIC PLAYING] BRIANNA: Let me
see what you’re– PAULO GUERRERO: We were
climbing up the side of the wall and I flipped over and I felt
the rope go slack a little bit and I felt like I was falling. Oh, [BLEEP]. Am I dying? [MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: “Our Community”
will return after the break. [MUSIC PLAYING] We now return to
“Our Community.” PAULO GUERRERO: Oh, [BLEEP]. It’s pretty scary when
you don’t feel a lot, but you feel something. BRIANNA: We’re just
going to turn you around. So kind of flip yourself
around the other way. PAULO GUERRERO:
Nothing happened. It was just me overthinking
it, which happens a lot, too. Oh, it’s so hard. There’s like so much friction. It’s not easy, and it’s
actually a lot harder, and it requires patience
and a lot of things that I’m not super strong with. I think you get frustrated, but
you can’t do anything about it. When you want to go
higher, the only way to go is up, so try to keep going. [CHATTER] BRENT GOODMAN: I think
that the climb that he did was hard for him. He might have come
into it thinking that it was going to be easy. PAULO GUERRERO:
I’m going to cheat. No, I’m not. No, I’m not. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: I am going
to do my second climb of the day and I’ve been told
that this is supposed to be quite challenging. Climbing. TONY: Yeah. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
Any time you’re faced with a new wall
or a new challenge, there’s something
to get used to. TONY: Go to your left
and you got a crack. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Yeah. TONY: Step up. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Climbing
is kind of like life. You keep going up these walls
and you struggle and you struggle, and then you finally
get out onto this plateau and you’ve made it. TONY: Nice, dude. Left foot up higher. Try and get into that
crack as much as possible. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
And then you’ve got to find the next
handhold, the next foothold, and there’s a bit
more of a struggle. Yeah. Oh, [BLEEP]. Damn it. TONY: You okay? DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
Yeah, I’m good. I don’t need to be
the best climber ever. I just need to say that
I’ve been able to climb and I’ve been able to climb
some challenging things. TONY: Nice. Good, Donovan. Hop up on. Come on. Yeah. Nice, dude. That’s it. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: And
before you know it, you’re at the top of the wall,
tapping the anchor and saying, OK, lower me down. And that’s a sense
of accomplishment. Am I up top? TONY: Yeah, that’s it. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Whoo! TONY: Nice, man. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: (SINGING)
You shake my nerves and you rattle my brain. Too much love
drives a man insane. You broke my will. Oh, what a thrill. Goodness gracious,
great balls of fire. TONY: That’s the ground. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Oh, wow. TONY: Nice, dude. Well done, man. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: Thanks. Oh, that was a good challenge. There’s something thrilling
about passing the plateau. There’s far too many people who
are blind or visually impaired who limit themselves. To see somebody who isn’t
afraid to accomplish new things, it hopefully inspires them to be
the best self that they can be. It’s not just about
being on the rock. It’s about the social aspect
and supporting each other as you climb. BRENT GOODMAN: All right, Paolo! TONY: Come on, Paolo. BRENT GOODMAN: Keep it up. TONY: Push it. Almost at the top. Keep on trucking. Yeah, dude, come on. Keep it going. You’re almost there. Yeah, dude. Yeah. Come on. PAULO GUERRERO: It was really
nice having a bunch of people to encourage you to do stuff,
because without encouragement, it’s hard to finish things. TONY: Yeah, dude. Yeah. BRIANNA: Whoo! PAULO GUERRERO: It’s good
to hear you guys all yell. It’s definitely kind of– I have to get this
done for everybody. [MUSIC PLAYING] [CHEERS AND APPLAUSE] PAULO GUERRERO: It’s going
to be hard to get off these hills and these few
bumps that we encounter, but once you do it,
it’ll be worth it cause you can say that you did it. Nothing worth doing is easy. So you might as well try
and do something big. TONY: All right, man. BRIANNA: Yeah. You did great! TONY: Wait, wait. We’re not done yet. You need one of these. Crisp high five. Nice, dude. Well done. BRIANNA: Good. PAULO GUERRERO: Good. BRIANNA: All right. WOMAN 2: Some shade. TONY: Yeah, and some water. PAULO GUERRERO: Oh,
you got some now? TONY: Yeah, you want some water? PAULO GUERRERO: Oh,
do I. Do I ever. DONOVAN TILDESLEY:
I think it’s all about raising awareness,
raising an understanding of what can be done, raising the
visibility of adaptive climbing as a whole. BRENT GOODMAN:
The audacious goal would be that climbing becomes
a more inclusive accessible activity as it
continues to grow, and really just sharing
the magic of climbing. DONOVAN TILDESLEY: (SINGING)
I believe I can fly. I believe I can touch the sky. I think about it
every night and day. NARRATOR: Producer and
director, Nathan Skillen. Director of Photography,
Jonathan Krauth. Camera Operator, Kieran Brownie. Location Audio, David Daoud. Editor, Tavi Parusel. Sound Design and
Mixing, Adam Johnson. Colorist, Phoebe Titus. Special thanks, Brian
Moorhead, District of Squamish, Conland Mansfield, Feral
Strength and Conditioning, and the Arbutus Club. Integrated Described Video
Specialist, Ron Rickford. Regional Content
Specialist, Sylvi Fekete. Coordinating Producer,
Jennifer Johnson. Director, Production, Cara Nye. Director, Programming
Brian Perdue. VP, Programming and Production,
John Melville, President and CEO, David Errington. Copyright 2019
Accessible Media, Inc. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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