Modernization Webinar: Answering Your Modernization Questions (July 25, 2019)

Modernization Webinar: Answering Your Modernization Questions (July 25, 2019)


We will now begin the Copyright Office’s
Fourth Copyright Modernization Webinar. During the program, attendees may
submit questions using the Q&A panel on the right side of the WebEx screen. You might have to expand the panel by clicking on the arrow next to where
the label Q&A appears. First, please welcome the
Register of Copyrights and Director of the Copyright Office, Karyn Temple.>>Thank you, and welcome everyone to our
fourth public webinar on modernization. In April, we released to the public our vision
for the next five years in a new strategic plan. Our vision centers on the Supreme
Court’s recognition of copyright as the engine of free expression. Modernization is a key component of the plan, as
the office looks to completely reimagine itself to meet the challenges of today and tomorrow. Critical to the success of our
efforts is an ongoing public dialogue, and these webinars are one of the tools we are
using to keep the lines of communication open. Over the last several months, we have received
a number of questions about modernization. So, for today’s webinar, we will take the
opportunity to address some of those questions. We hope to help the public understand the
function of the enterprise copyright system, or ECS, as we call it, future available data,
and other issues related to modernization. Please feel free to submit further
questions during the course of this program. Our program today will be
presented by Ricardo Faraj-Feijoo, Director of the Copyright
Modernization Office, and Suman Shukla, section head for Data Management in
the Copyright Modernization Office. Once again, thank you for joining
us, and thank you for your interest.>>The first question is
to Ricardo Faraj-Feijoo. Can you clarify the difference
between the ECS user experience and the components of registration
and recordation?>>Thank you, [inaudible], and thank everyone
for participating in today’s webinar. So, the ECS is envisioned as the new
web-based cloud host, or user-friendly platform for the public to interact
with the Copyright Office. That’s what we call the application
that is going to support the mission of
the entire Copyright Office. The global design and usability testing
are the user experience aspect of the ECS. So, we want to make sure that the
system is user-friendly, is easy to use, is not complicated, and it can actually — the experience that you have when
you use the system is satisfactory to our customers, and not
to a specific audience. The specific system functionality supporting
recreational registration are envisioned to be an integrated component. In other words, recreational registration,
there will be the same look and feel and the same aspects of functionality across
all offices within the Copyright Office. So, what you see in recordation, functions of
recordation, they will be very similar as you go to the registration area, and so forth. So, we’re trying to make
the experience very unified. It’s like going to Amazon or some other
place, where you see that you’re going to want a point area, one place to actually
to do the transactions and then it takes you to different places, but the same
look and feel is still there.>>The next question, again, for Ricardo. With the new system, will
uploading the faster than it is now? Also, will we be able to upload
multiple files at the same time?>>So, the goal to the system is
to improve the user experience, and by improving the user experience, it will ease up how quickly you
can actually submit a registration, in that past, there’s so many steps to do it. We’re trying to improve internally
how that process will happen. So, and in essence, you will
have an improved experience. It’s not about being fast or slow, but
it’s like about how the experience is and how quickly you can get to
the end of that transaction. It all depends how, you know, how
complex your request is going to be. But the goal is, actually,
improve the user experience. To answer, can we upload a
few items at the same times? The goal is, yes, we’re trying, based
on the technology that we want to do. We want to improve that, as well. Where, instead of you doing one item at a time,
we might be able to do batches of those items. But we are actually looking into
developing APIs and other mechanisms. So, if members of industry or individuals have
large requests or things that we want to upload, it can be done very easily and very quickly.>>The next question is for Suman Shukla. What are some examples of the types of evidence-based decision
making that you anticipate. Alternatively, what kinds
of data will be available? For example, will there be aggregate
information on application types or geographic distributions, etc.?>>Thank you, and thank you
everyone for joining this webinar. So, talking about evidence-based decision
making, this is pretty much aligned with the copyright, as well
as library strategic plans, where we want to make data available online,
searchable, and make it available to the public for data transfer into perspective and
make information transfer to everyone. So, to bring those evidence-based decision
data, we need to perform some analysis in house, build data quality, so that we can
provide a consistent, complete, and accurate information to the public. To do that, we have to do a lot of work at
the back end, which we are already doing for the data management initiative,
and the outcome of this would be, we will be able to identify the key areas
that are having issues or holdups or places where there are — there is a resource
crunch, or there is a process gap, or analyzing those gaps would bring us stats
about how many registrations have been done? How many recordations have been done? Which specific area is registering more work? Why is this happening? What kind of correspondence is happening? What is the format of correspondence
people are using? It’s an email, phone call,
or, you know, drop ins? So, we will be able to identify different
categories of information and will be able to modify the process, streamline
the process, reduce the waste, and we’ll be able to make
more informed decisions for the benefit of the organization as a whole. Back to you [inaudible].>>The next question is also for Suman Shukla. With respect to digitization of the
card catalog, will it be searchable? Also, will you be using optical
character recognition with legacy cards?>>Sure. So, right now, we have 25,524 drawers
and 41.5 million images in card catalogs, and we have used the OCR technology
to capture the images online and also extra the metadata out of it. There are two indexes, as of now, ranging
from 1955 to 1970 and 1971 to 1977 that are available online in a searchable
format where users can go online and search those card catalogs
and images with the OCR data. The remaining would be made available —
they are available for browsing as of now, but they will be used with full search
capability once we have the metadata extracted from those OCRs. So just to clarify what the OCR means here,
it’s the optical character recognition, which is a method used in a mechanical or
electronic conversion of images of typed, handwritten, or printed text
into a machine-readable format. And the challenge with the current card
catalog is we have a range of handwritten data, which is not easy to convert into a
machine-readable format, and hence, we have challenges extracting
the metadata out of it. So, we have an ongoing initiative to capture
those metadata from those OCR images. Once they are fully available, we
will integrate the existing images, and those images would be
searachable to the users. Thank you.>>The next question is also for Suman Shukla. In the last webinar, you mentioned updates to
the user interface of the registration process. What is the office’s plan to integrate the
user interface with the underlying data model?>>Thank you, [inaudible], and
this I would start explaining with the Data Management
Initiative that we have been working for past over almost two to three years. We explored more than 18-plus databases,
interviewed the subject matter expertise from each division in the Copyright Office,
did some gap analysis of the existing data sets to create the enterprise data model,
and this data model, as of now, is a living model that can be used as a
baseline to develop any copyright system. So, the model is platform agnostic and scalable,
and we should be able to create and add or modify and update this enterprise data
model with any upcoming new requirements that we anticipate for our future system. We also have the data dictionary, so as
to target mapping of those data sets, which can be leveraged for
any future development. And this current data model can be used
as a baseline and can be incorporated into any requirements of a future system. So, it’s available, usable, and
we are using it as a baseline. So, the data team is already working
with initiatives like recordation, modernization initiatives, public records
systems, and the decision initiatives to use this data model to incorporate as
a baseline, and provide any data guidance. . So, yes, eventually, that’s the
goal, and we are working towards that, incorporated this data model into the
user interface for the future system.>>We will now address some questions that
have been submitted during this webinar. Question for Ricardo. I am curious about the pilot program
for an online recordation system. Who will be invited to participate
in this program, and what happens after the pilot program? Is there a timeline for client-facing
online recordation systems?>>So, the recordation pilot, we are going to
be sending invitations to select individuals and groups to participate in the pilot, and
what we’re trying to capture with the pilot and with its feedback from customers is
to see if we’re actually hitting the mark. Are we really addressing the requirements
and the concerns from our customers? After the pilot is released, we will
have a period of close to a year to take all the feedback from our customers,
make changes, improve the application, and then, a year from the time that the
pilot is released, or even earlier, we want to release then the first release
of the new automated recreation system. So, it doesn’t mean that we stop there. We want for customers to provide
feedback to us on a continuous basis, so we can actually improve
the experience as we go along. So, we are going to continue to get — receive
that feedback and inquire for that feedback to improve the product overall,
not only for recreation, but for all the aspects of
the ECS as we move forward. Thank you.>>Next question will be for Karen. Regarding the electronic title
list, or ETL, used for recordations, will the office be introducing a system that
allows remitters to test their ETL files to ensure it will be accepted, or will we be
subject to rejection months after submission?>>Right, thank you. That’s actually a really good question. One of the things that we received
in terms of feedback from our users, and which we will be incorporating into our
new system is to provide more transparency and communication, with respect
to the status of your application. Now I think all of the functionality will not
necessarily be there in the initial pilot phase, but this is something that by the
time that the full system goes online, we will hope to have fully
integrated into that new system. In the pilot phase, though, we
will have a dashboard, for example, where you will actually be able to
see the status of your application. So, you’ll be able to confirm, for
example, that we received the application. You will know that it will be under review. You will know whether, you know, the
initial review has required more questions that will need to be answered, and/or whether
it will be — or whether it has rejected. So, the pilot will start exploring increased
transparency in communication with our users, and then, we’ll use that feedback from the
pilot to see if there’s even another few steps that we might want to take in this area
before we do launch the full system.>Next question is for Ricardo. Does the Copyright Office anticipate
converting all registration processes to the new online system? For example, automated database applications
must still be filed on paper at this time.>>The answer to this question, once we
put the new ECS, while we are, for example, with our business process engineering
effort that we’re working on now. We want to look at our processes
and see if the processes that we’re currently doing are effective,
are streamlined, and what we wanted to do was improve how we do business internally,
and one of the areas is that we’re going to be addressing on that is
what you just stated there. We want to see if doing an electronic
submission, it will actually be more efficient. I know we get people that actually
come to the office and do walk-ins, that bring materials and artifacts. So, we have to ensure that we continue to
support both aspects of how products come in and are registered into this office. So, we want to improve both experience, but
as we do the BPR, we are going to, hopefully, address or improve our current processes
to make that experience easier and quicker.>>And I would just add — this is Karen Temple,
that, you know, as we do explore the, you know, how much we can make this into
a full online system, you know, those are some of the questions
that we’ll be asking. As some of you know, you have been utilizing
our new group registration processes, those we are encouraging people to file online,
so that they can get used to using our system, kind of as an exclusively online system,
but at the same time, as Ricardo eluded to, we want to make sure that if there are
customers who do need to have access to paper for our variety of reasons, for example,
maybe they don’t have the broadband access or computer access that they need, that we are
able to meet those customers where they are, as well, and that that option is
still available in some instances. So, the overall focus, of course, is to
turn into a almost completely online system, but we are also going to ensure that
we are able to meet those customers who don’t have immediate access to an online
system, where they need to be met, as well.>>Next question is for Ricardo. How do I sign up to test
the pilot-filing system?>>If you have an interest
to become a participant, send us an email to [email protected] Tell us the interest, what areas
he would like to participate, if it’s either recordation or all. And then, we will make sure, as we are
doing the selection of the individuals to do the pilot we reach out —
we can actually reach out to you and invite you to be part of this pilot. We want to make sure that we are covering
everyone, all aspects of industry, and individuals, authors, and creators, to
ensure that we are doing what we’re supposed to be doing to the benefit of you, the customer.>>Will I be able to register
a sound recording online and receive confirmation
immediately for recordings?>>I believe that is the intent
of the system, as Karen stated. What we’re planning is to
have some sort of dashboard that as you submit your product,
it would be registered. You can actually see where it sits,
how it’s been assessed or not. We are planning to do some of the requirements,
make some changes that the information that you are requested to provide is
accurate and it is exactly what we need, so we don’t have to go in correspondence, and we
check something that you have already submitted, like is happening, I think, my understanding
is now, that at times, you submit something,, and it takes some time to get back before your
find out that the scenario on the application. What we’re trying to do is improve that and make
it that once you click and submit your product, you know where the product goes,
and if it has been assessed or not. So, we are planning to improve that. That is our hope. And so, it makes the, again, the process
easy and quicker for you, the customer. Thanks.>>Another question for Ricardo, will there be
an RFP, and will this be open to the public, regarding strategy, oversight,
and communications of the copyright modernization plan?>>So, that’s a good question. So, we are going — we are working with
the office of the chief information officer and the general schedule agency, GSA. And there will be an RFP that will be sent. They’re currently working
on the planning stages. That it will be sent to the public, as we
did a year and half ago, to solicit feedback from industry when it comes to constructive
the or innovative contracting vehicles to create either the full
ECS or components of the ECS. There might be certain areas of industry, or
there might be a suggestion to do it better. We are open to that. We said we were going to do the
RFP, and we are going to do it. It’s in the planning stages, and we
should have something, hopefully, before the end of this year that it will
go out to the public in several vehicles. GSA is helping us with that, and
hopefully, maybe, in a few months, I can give you a more definitive
update, when the actual RFP will be out. So stay tuned.>>And this is Karen again. I would just add to that, that
RFP, as Ricardo mentioned, is to explore potentially
creative contracting solutions for our copyright modernization initiative. It won’t go, generally, strategy,
oversight, and communications, as the question, you know, requested. However, we do plan on communicating
directly with users in a variety of fora. For example, in our webinar, such as this. Many of you many have participated, as well,
in the most recent NOI that we submitted on modernization, where we asked for questions,
and we ask questions and we asked for feedback, rather, on some of those questions. And so, we will continue to do
notices of inquiry, as well, asking for information directly from the
public, in terms of our strategy and oversight. So, the RFP will be more focused on the
contracting solutions, and we will continue to use a variety of fora to communicate,
generally, about strategy, oversight, and communication, with respect to the overall
modernization plan, as we move forward.>>Next question also for Ricardo. Are there any plans to make complete copyright
certificates available for viewing online, and if so, would the Copyright
Office scan old certificates?>>So, the first question, the answer is yes. I believe one of the — as we were
exploring some of the requirements and needs from our customers, that was one we
have captured the user story to do. That once you actually are submitting an
application, and you can actually see a preview of how the certificate is going to look
like, and you can actually print a draft copy of that certificate before you actually get
your official signature from the office. With regards to certificates that have been
issued in the past, I believe we have an effort to digitize all our — all records or records
that have been in the copyright office from — the millions of records, and we want
to make that all online eventually. It’s a daunting effort to do that,
because we have to take a lot of the information from the old system. So, as part of the data migration that
is going to occur from the old system, we want to move that data, make it available
online, make it available on the new system. So, it will be as seamless as possible. It’s not going to be done initially. We’re not going to see it right
away, especially for old records, but anything that you register new, the
intent is that you will see that certificate.>>And question for Ricardo. “I’ve heard that the [inaudible] system
decommissioned and Salesforce will implemented. When does ECO expect that?>>I actually — we have not made a
determination on a product, or on a solution. We are not driving our decision when it
comes to development based on a product. We’re actually driving our decision
based on the requirements of the office. So to clarify any rumors, we have
not made a selection or decided to go in any particular platform when it
comes to the solution of the ECS.>>Question for Ricardo. Are there plans to enlarge the file size
upload limitations to allow the upload of deposit materials or files
that are significantly over the current 500-megabyte limit?>>I believe that is the intent. I know we cannot, and again,
open the size to a larger size. I think we need to understand
— make sure that our capacities that should make the library
has the capacity to do that. But yes, the initial limit that we have now, that is going to increase
tremendously moving forward. So, yes, we will not have that
limitation that’s currently happening now.>>Question for Ricardo. Will there be a reformatting or restructuring
of the US Copyright Office Catalog, so that it makes linkages between registrations and recordations and one
recordations to another? That is, a chain of titles?>>The answer is absolutely, yes. That is the intent. We are trying to — we’re currently working
into creating a new public record as part of what Suman was speaking earlier. Her initiative is to actually make that happen. To make sure that all our data is
mapped correctly and linked correctly. So, we will not have limitations
that we’ve had in the past.>>Suman, would you like
to add anything to that?>>Sure, and this is pretty much based
on the data management initiative. We are working — we have created that
data model, enterprise data model, that I have talked about earlier. We do have those close to target
mapping, that means end-to-end mapping of the data information slope
from one end to another. We do have our business process mapped,
as per our enterprise data module. So, once we implement, we will make sure
that the information that’s in the copyright, whether it’s recordation, registration,
public records, historical records, the intent is to mapall the
information end-to-end. So, if we pull in information regarding
a title or an author or a book, we should be able to pull
all the related information at different levels of depth, as we wish to see. We may get a high level, and we can
drill down to more details to it. So, the intent is to connect the data, so we can have all information connected
together and available to the public.>>And this will be our final
question for Karen. If you are going to make the online process
more transparent by providing status updates, will you also show that the Copyright Office
has reached regarding the expiration date of the application date?>>Thanks. I think that that question might be focused on
the issue of duration, or term, of copyright, and that is something I know that many
people are interested in and wanting to have, you know, easier information. Is often very difficult to calculate the ending
of the term of copyright for particular works. While we won’t have, you know, specific
dates to say the copyright has expired at this certain date, by providing more
information about the author, information, for example, ownership information that
will, hopefully, enable people to make that calculation themselves
in a much easier way. So, we might not — we won’t
be doing the calculation. That’s, you know, a legal determination,
but we will be providing more information that should be able to assist the public
in making that determination themselves.>>That will conclude today’s webinar. Thank you for your participation, and
please join us for the next webinar. Any questions about modernization can be sent
to the email address [email protected]

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