Long Island Sound Blue Plan: Recreation

Long Island Sound Blue Plan: Recreation


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: Long Island
Sound, its waters are enjoyed for
recreation year round. Anglers, boaters, swimmers,
divers, and nature watchers are just some of its many users. NATHAN FROHLING:
There’s many things that are special about
Long Island Sound. I think what makes
this uniquely special is that you have so many
people who live so close to it. And at the same time,
you have a water body that’s still remarkably intact. It’s very accessible for
recreational use– fishing, boating, et cetera,
for wildlife viewing, for just the beauty
of the scenery. People come out just to
look at Long Island Sound and feel close to it. JERRY MORGAN: Long
Island Sound I think is probably
one of the greatest bodies of water around. It has everything you need. It’s a great habitat. It’s got great tributaries. It’s something that’s a
treasure and something that needs to be taken care of. WAYNE GOLDSMITH: I love
Long Island Sound because it is a very calm area to fish in. You’re not in the open ocean,
and many of the tourists are concerned about
the seas and so on. In most cases, the seas
are relatively calm here. And if they’re not, we have
areas where we can run to so that they can
still enjoy themselves and we can still
catch them fish. We have a great fishery
here, and it’s really a blessing to have it. NARRATOR: Connecticut’s
marinas and yacht clubs connect nearly 100,000
recreational boaters to the Sound. RON WISHNA: Recreational
boating is a vital pastime when it comes to the livelihood
of the Long Island Sound. We have so many
places to explore, so many towns, so many
rivers, so many tributaries. I’ve spent 38 years on Long
Island Sound exploring, and I don’t feel like I’ve
touched a tenth of it yet. KEVIN DOWD: So Long Island
Sound is a wonderful place to hold races because it’s
large enough that the wind is consistent across a large area. DAVE PECK: Today, we have
a fall series in Blue Jays, and it’s called frostbite
racing because it gets a little nippy at times. The fall is a great season
because the water is still warm, and so even if you capsize
your boat and go for a swim, you can stand it for a while. SAAM GREENMAN: There is a lot
to do out there above the water but I think even
more under the water. One of the best recreational
uses of the Sound that I enjoy is scuba diving. And there are a lot of
different things you can do. I get bored in the
tropics and the Caribbean. Here is always an adventure. We’ve got tons of shipwrecks. They’ve been sinking ships here
pretty much as long as they’ve been driving them around here. There’s also hunting and
collecting, filling your basket with clams or getting
lobsters or spear fishing. There’s a lot of
exploration you can do. There’s reefs here. A lot of people don’t
even know that we have coral and sponges,
urchins, anemones, and even some seahorses. There’s fun out there. There’s a lot of fun. NARRATOR: To minimize conflicts
with the Sound’s many uses today and in the future,
Connecticut began work on a marine spatial plan. The Long Island Sound
Blue Plan includes preserving the Sound’s special
ecosystems and resources while making sure the
decision-making process is science based and inclusive
of all stakeholders. MELISSA GATES: What is so
wonderful about the Blue Plan is that it brings
together potentially affected stakeholders
with decision makers and regulatory
agencies to utilize the best available data, the same
data to look at what’s happening in our ocean waters. ALICIA MOZIAN: If you have these
uses mapped, which the Blue Plan will have plenty
of maps, then you can site endeavors in areas that
won’t interfere with regattas and that sort of thing. SIDNEY HOLBROOK:
Well, there’s nothing in the Blue Plan that deals with
the regulation of Long Island Sound. It’s more of an
advisory tool for those that do make those decisions. SAAM GREENMAN: I
think ultimately it’s going to be a great
resource, and anybody who is already
exploring things, it’s a way for them to share it, too. BILL GARDELLA: The
interests really do align because if you’re
a boater, if you’re a paddle boarder, if you’re a sailor,
no matter what you do, you want a clean
Long Island Sound. So we have to be real careful
how we take care of the Sound, and on this is– what the
plan should help us with that. NARRATOR: If you would
like to share your comments and concerns about the Long
Island Sound Blue Plan, please visit our website
for more information. [MUSIC PLAYING]  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *