I’ve never seen this many sharks!! Sailing Vessel Delos Ep. 135

I’ve never seen this many sharks!! Sailing Vessel Delos Ep. 135


Our whole goal right now is to
try and get to Bassas da India so we can do some diving. Lots of sharks, huh? Like, 30 sharks following
us the whole time. [MUSIC PLAYING] (SINGING) One dot represents
[INAUDIBLE] people say, when people start
originally from my homeland, like my old man say,
there’s nothing impossible– Previously on Delos– Bye-bye, Madagascar. OK, I’m not entirely
sure what is going on, but something happened
with a ripped genoa. The genoa connects
to the furler. It came off, or it chafed
through or something. So I’m going to have to go
up there and take a look. So, I’ve just finished
my [INAUDIBLE].. And the sun is shining,
and we’re sailing, so that’s really good. We finally got some wind. It’s been really calm
for quite a few days now. And we’ve been
working quite a lot. And last night
was a bit intense. And Brian had to go up the
mast, and it wasn’t very nice. But it’s fixed,
so it’s all good. And today it’s sunny,
and it’s really nice. I wanted to talk a
little bit about what I like the most about passages. And when I thought
about it, it’s kind of the feeling
of almost hibernation that I think that
I enjoy the most. You have the time to
relax, to just sit. You have the time to read book. You don’t have to
feel guilty about it. You don’t feel weird about it. It’s OK to just
lay and do nothing. I guess what I kind of
struggle with the most, or I think it’s the
most challenging, is when it’s quite rough and the
constant movement of the boat. Not all passages are
very bad, and hopefully we just have a few days of it. But you live with it,
and you find your spots. How are you feeling
today, Breeyawn? Pretty good. I was in front of the
computer and started to feel a little bit squishy,
so I came outside to read, which for some reason
doesn’t bother me. So I’m just going to chill
out here for a while, drink some ice water. Doesn’t sound too bad. It’s a good life. Come on, Uli. He’s a tough guy. Oh, yeah. Go! Go, go, go, go, go! Go! Pull! All right, man. Look at this. That’s going to be
good eating, man. What type is it, [INAUDIBLE]? It’s either a big
eye or a bluefin. Ooh. I knew it. I told you. Sushi tonight! You want to get the knife? Then he’ll give his
little death throes. First fish, Uli? Yeah. I think there’s something
else on this one. Good job. Thanks, old man. Something else on there? We’ll put him back. Yeah, definitely. Look at him going
for the big lure while mama took the small one. Bye-bye, little one. It’s a good, healthy tuna, huh? Yeah, it is. You going to cook today, Bri? I think we have to do sushi. Yeah? I think sushi is in
order for dinner. So you’re getting your wish. Yeah, it looks like. What did you say when you
first got on the boat? We have to catch a tuna, and
we have to eat fresh sushi. So we’ve got our papers ready. We’ve got a little
meat laid out. The only veggies we
have is cucumber. We have rice going on. I’m going to roll it
outside, because I don’t think the German
brothers have ever done anything like this before. OK, so you put a little
bit of water on the paper. And then you roll it. So the trick is to have a
little bit of a [INAUDIBLE].. And then keep pressure,
don’t squeeze it too much. That’s what she said. There is one. Whoa. Is that right? Yes. Yeah, go on, go on, go on. Go, [INAUDIBLE] Go [INAUDIBLE] Go [INAUDIBLE] Yeah. I do. Look! I do. Look, look, look, look! Look at that, man. Look at that, man. Nice job. So it’s about 4:00
in the morning, and we’re just coming up on
our fourth full day at sea. And a few hours we’ve
been in the fifth day. And so far, the trip
been pretty good. We’ve had really light
winds, in fact, we’ve got, like, zero wind right
now, so we started motoring a few hours ago. And our whole goal right
now is to try and get to Bassas da India, so
we can do some diving. And right now we’re about
223 miles away from Bassas. So, we’re going to try and time
our speed so that we arrive first thing in
the morning, which should be, at this speed,
about two days from now. Because we’re going just real
slow, just over four knots to try and save as
much fuel as we can. But we’ll have to see. Hopefully everything’ll line
up, because last time we dove there it was fantastic. And I would really love
to dive there again. So, I just woke up. And it looks like
on the wind charts that we will have some more
endless days of motoring. We’re going to try
and fly the drone, and see if we can get a
picture of Delos going up and down on the swells. It might look pretty cool. Yeah. I’d say the swells are,
like, three meters? Yeah. That’d be– Probably. But really, really far apart. So, like, at huge
periods, they’re just big, rolling
mountains that come by. With no end. [MUSIC PLAYING] To Later that afternoon
a miracle happened. We actually had enough wind
to sail for a few hours, and it was awesome. Delos was back in
her element, using the power of mother
nature to move us closer to our destination. But just as quickly as the wind
appeared, it disappeared again. What happened to the wind? The wind has disappeared. Again. As it does every afternoon. And we’re trying to figure
out how much we can motor. So, a few days ago me and
Brady did a little test. We figured out exactly how much
fuel we had with the dipstick. And then we always
made sure that we motored at the same RPM,
1,500, which is pretty low. And then we measured
the engine hours. So, we’ve gone, we’ve
motored 24 hours since then, and it was 385 liters
of fuel at that point. So let’s see what we’re at now. Now we’re at 330. So that’s 2.6 liters per hour. So that’s not so bad. So, if we have about 330
left, divided by 2.6, 2.5, that’s 132 hours
we can go, right? And let’s say that we can
always make five knots. So we still have a
range of 634 miles. So we’re in good shape. Yeah. We’re not going to run
out, like, tomorrow. Day 6 at sea, and
it is friggin hot. So, we’re going to stop the boat
and go for a refreshing swim in the ocean. How deep is it here? Probably 3,000 meters? 3,000 meters? [INAUDIBLE] Let’s do it. Let’s go for a swim. OK. Stopping boat. Gross. I just saw a little
wiener schnitzel, yeah? The fruit basket? The fruit basket? Thanks, brother. I want to take my pants off. You’re a dick face. Nice job. Those are my four-day undies. They had two days left. Oh, those are done now. They’re done. Can you do it? [INAUDIBLE] Oh,
god, it’s terrible. Ugh! How nice was that, [INAUDIBLE]? It’s so refreshing, and
the water is so clear. I can’t wait ’til
we get to Bassas. I think the vis is
going to be epic. Bassas da India is an atoll
located right in the middle of the Mozambique Channel. 250 miles to the east
you’ll find Madagascar. And 250 miles to the
west is Mozambique and the continent of Africa. The water around here is
deep, about 10,000 meters, over 30,000 feet. What we’re seeing is all that
remains of an ancient volcano rising out of the depths. Eons upon eons of
wind and weather have worn the volcanic
island completely away. Now all that remains is
a coral reef encircling a brilliant blue lagoon. There’s no land
here, which means no airport, and no people. The only way to get
here is by boat. Plus, it’s considered a French
territory and a marine reserve. So technically, any
commercial fishing and tours are considered illegal. All of these things
mean Bassas da India is an untouched
underwater wonderland. It’s known for big
sharks, big grouper, and lots of shipwrecks. And that, to a
bunch of dive nuts, means we absolutely must find
a way to get in the water here. OK, so we are about 10
miles away from the reef. I don’t see anything
on radar yet. Normally you can
pick up, like, rocks, or there’s some shipwrecks also. But I don’t see anything,
even at 16 miles out. We have no sails up at all, and
we’re still doing four knots. Because the wind
is from behind now. So, we’re kind of in
a tough situation, because we’re not 100%
sure how far the reef is. And it is 4:00 in the morning. So we probably have another two
hours before the sun comes up. I’ve put a line in
here that we don’t want to cross before it’s bright. You know, if we get to that
line before the sun comes up, we’ll have to either
sail north or south, or we can even just turn
around and motor directly into the wind. Just keep checking radar. Hopefully we can see
something pop up. Because there’s shipwrecks that
are out of the water there, that are on top of the reef. Yeah, like wrecks that have
hit the reef, and on top. So normally you
can see on radar. So it’s 6:00 AM. I just came on watch,
and we’re here at Bassas. I can just start to
make out the reef now. We’re just a few miles away. Check it out. Out on the horizon, there’s
that line of breaking water. That’s all that marks the reef. There’s actually no land here. So the only way to spot it is
by the break on the reef itself. Could you imagine being, like,
in the old days of sailing, before there was charts
and GPS and radar, and just coming across
this thing at night, and just wrecking
your ship here. And that’s why there
are so many wrecks here, because this is right
on the route from, like, coming anywhere in the Indian
Ocean, down the Mozambique Channel, around the
Cape back to Europe. All the ships came through here. So, I think I heard there’s,
like, at least 150 wrecks right on this one reef. So we’ve made it to the spot
that we wanted to get to, but it’s super deep,
way too deep to anchor. Like, right up to the reef it’s
about 50, almost 60 meters. So I think our plan
is to put Maggie in, because I don’t want to get
Delos any closer to the reef. And then we’ll dive off Maggie. The only snag in our plans
is there’s a boat out there, 12 miles away. You can see it through
the reflection, but they’re right here. And it’s kind of a
gray area if you’re supposed to be here or not. Like, we actually have a
permit from [INAUDIBLE],, which is the area that administers,
like the French government department that
administers this area. So we can visit here, but
we’re supposed to, I think, visit Europa Island first
and pay some fees and stuff. And you’re not
supposed to dive here. I’m not sure exactly why. They probably say
it’s for safety, because it’s so remote
or something like that. So, we’re going to
chill out for a bit and see if these
guys come any closer. Because it looks like
sort of a weird boat. They’re not on AIS,
so hopefully it’s not a French Navy or
anything like that. This is sailing
vessel Delos on 1-6. Come back, over. Yeah, this is [INAUDIBLE]
How may I help you? 06 please. 06. This Russian. The ship was strange to
us because they were only doing three or four
knots, which is pretty slow for a
100-meter, 300-foot ship this far out to sea. Every 10 miles or
so, their course would zigzag back and
forth at right angles. Our best guess? They were in under-the-radar
fishing operation, dragging nets and
filling their freezers. Yes. Good morning to you guys. We just saw you guys
floating out here. We’re passing by
Bassas da India, and haven’t seen
a boat in a while. So we just wanted to say
hello, and see how you’re doing and what you’re doing. Very good. [INAUDIBLE] OK. You’re on your way to Japan. We are on our way
to South Africa. All right, then. [INAUDIBLE] OK. You as well, have
a good journey. We’ll be standing by on 16. That was very quick,
quick and efficient. We are on our way to Japan. On their way to Japan. Imagine how much they
must have to pull in to make it worthwhile, to take a
300-foot ship across two oceans and back to their market. Hi. We’re going to go say
hello to the sharkies. Oh, man. Have a good dive. We’ll say hello and let them
know you’re coming next. Tell them I’m coming
soon to see my babies. Have fun, guys. I will be here. I’m on 69, Jens, on VHF. OK. The pleasure channel. Pleasure channel. Yeah. Right. Au revoir! See you soon. To the reef! To the reef we go. 3, 2, 1– We expected the
waters to be sharky, but man, they were right under
us the second we dove in. It was shark city down here. They were mostly
gray reef sharks. The larger grays were
in the 2-meter range, with a few smaller
white- and blacktips thrown in for variety. And they were super curious,
coming right past us, trying to figure out
what the hell we were. But they didn’t act
aggressive, just curious. So me and Karin felt
pretty comfortable. I do think it was a little
more stressful for Uli, though. Not too bad for your
third dive, eh Uli? [MUSIC PLAYING] Just breathe. Just breathe. Just breathe. [INAUDIBLE] breathe. Breathe. Breathe. Breathe. Breathe. Just a short distance
from where we dropped in, we found some debris that
looked to be from a shipwreck. And then a little
deeper, we found it– the massive stern portion of
a fairly modern shipwreck. Given its location,
we’re pretty sure it was the other half of the
ship we saw in the reef above. How massive was this thing? So lucky to be diving
in such a remote spot. Like, in order to get out here
you have to fly to Africa, and then get a boat from Aputu. Pool And you’re
not even supposed to be out here, really. But it’s definitely
untouched paradise. Healthy reef, sharks. Doesn’t get much
better than this. Just sailing back
and forth, waiting for my turn to go diving. [MUSIC PLAYING] [INAUDIBLE] Got a grip,
got a grip [INAUDIBLE] Free as a bird, let’s
see how high I can fly. Free imagination [INAUDIBLE]
If that’s all I think, then that’s all I’ll see. What the [BEEP]? How cool was that? That was awesome. [INAUDIBLE] Shark city. Really? I have never seen
so many sharks. But they weren’t aggressive. They were just curious. They were just so cool. How was the vis? Whites, greys. Yeah, the vis is like,
maybe 10 meters, 15 meters. Yeah, it looks
quite cloudy, but– It’s not crazy. There’s big grouper down there. There’s monsters. And so many sharks. Lots of sharks, huh? Like, 30 sharks following
us the whole time. Just all around. Like up to all his
fins, you know? Like, nudging his fins. What do you think, Uli? How was that? I– So it was pretty cool? It was good. Do you like sharks? He does now. Maybe a little bit more. Such amazing diving. Like, I have never, ever
seen that many sharks. Like we literally went in
and it was, like, 15 of them just circling us. I have never
experienced that before. It was so amazing. And I’ve never been that
close to as many of them as well, I think. It was just really impressive. Like, they’re such cool animals. And they just, like,
mm-hmm , can I eat this? Can I eat this? And then, when they kind of
realized that we weren’t food and weren’t going to give them
any food, they kind of gave up. And it was just a few
of them, like four, that stayed with us for,
like, the whole dive, and the second dive, too. But really amazing
creatures, and I’m so happy, you know, we get to
be able to see this. Because it’s not many places
in the world it still exists. So, we kind of take turns. And we’re diving
in teams of two. So me and Brian and Uli as one
team, and then Brady and Jens goes as one team. And the dinghy is always kind
of following the people down. So, just in case
something happens or they need to get picked up. So Brian is in the dinghy now,
and are going to be down there, like, by the reef, just
by the edge waiting for them to come up. And me and Uli are
on Delos just kind of sailing around,
filling the dive tanks, and making sure that
Delos is all good. So it’s a good team effort. Just for safety, you know? Safety first. All right, dudes. Go ahead. You go first. You going to do, what? 30 minutes? 40 minutes? What are you going to do? Yeah, probably 40. OK. Have fun. OK. Bye-bye. 2, 3, go. I’m ready. Un, deux, trois. [MUSIC PLAYING] It’s been a hell of a day, man. Like, I’m pretty exhausted. Three dives, filling your
own tanks, in and out of the dinghy. It’s a lot. It’s a lot of work,
and I love it. It’s been a frickin’
fantastic day. I’m so glad we got to dive here. And the weather’s been perfect. It’s just been incredible. So, the guys have been
down about 25 minutes now. So, hopefully in the next 10
or 15 minutes, they’ll be up. Until then, my job
is just to float out here and wait until they
pop their little heads up. [MUSIC PLAYING] Dudes. Another amazing dive, bro. Yeah? Yeah, it was like a wall
that goes straight [HISS].. Serious wild dive. Not even like a slope. It was just a
straight down wall. Right when we got
in, a big turtle. No way. Really? Yeah. Yeah, it swam away, and then — oh man, just beautiful
reef, beautiful fish. A toast to Bassas da India
for a [BEEP] good show. Yeah, that’ll look
good [INAUDIBLE].. Cheers. I’m exhausted. Cheers. Cheers. I’m exhausted. But a beautiful day of diving– [INTERPOSING VOICES] You guys did killer for that
being, like, your third dive or whatever. New underwater divers killed it. And now, we’re out. Southwest. 685 miles to Durban. Phew. Up next– The front for the low
pressure system is here. That’s it. We have a couple of
more miles before we get blasted with southerly winds. We’re beating probably, I guess,
20 knots of wind southeast, and it’s a bit rough. South Africa. Uli, why didn’t
you tell anybody? We’re back. Africa. Why can’t you sip? First thing in the morning. That’s a wrap. Like it? I like it a lot. Country music and diving,
that’s what life’s all about.

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