International Live Chat #3: Thriving in First Year

International Live Chat #3: Thriving in First Year


So hi everyone! Welcome to our third and final international
student live chat. So, before we officially start the live chat,
we’re going to ask our friends some questions while we wait for everyone to log in. We’re going to start in five minutes. So, Kealan and Shreena, I’m going to ask
you some questions. So the first one will be if you were an animal,
what animal would you be? Well I’ve always, you know, ever since I
was a little boy I always thought myself as a lion but personality tests have always told
me I was a turtle instead, so I’m still trying. I’m working hard towards it. I mean, you can be both. Yeah, you could, but preferably a Lion. Okay okay. Still trying. For me I always knew that I wanted to be a
marine animal, so it would be a dolphin and it resonates with my horoscope Pisces. So, a dolphin, why? I guess just because it goes with the flow. Yeah, that’s so cool. How about you? For me, I really want to be a seal. So, when it [*clapping*] – that’s so cute
and they’re actually really smart animals so it’s like me, smart and cute! Yeah. Of course! I really want to be a seal. Let’s move on to the next question and meanwhile,
please stay tuned. We’re going to start the live chat in about
four minutes. So the next question would be, what superpower
would you want and why? I would personally like to be able to teleport
from place to place. I love traveling, so it saves time and I can
wake up late and go to class like in a minute, so that would be a superpower that I would
love to have. That’s cool. That’s great. For me, definitely the ability to fly to warm
places during wintertime is something I would love to do. I would like to transform into a geese – a
goose – yes – for a more Canadian context, let me put it this way. Okay so for me I would like the ability to
talk to animals as there are so many squirrels and, of course, geese on campus. I would be able to know what’s happening around
like every corner. I would be able to know what you are doing
and what you are doing, yeah. Yes, exactly. That’s cool. Okay, before moving on to the next question
we still have three more minutes until the official live chat starts. So the next question will be what weird food
combination did you have before? For me, it would have been, okay so this actually
happened, like by accident. I was in a rush to go to work in Trinidad
once and I had peanut butter, scrambled eggs, and ketchup in one. I don’t know about the flavours, if it was
sweet or if it was salty, but it was absolutely fine. Try it! So you eat it together? In a sandwhich? In a sandwhich. Okay interesting. You kill like two birds in one stone. Okay, that’s a weird combination. I mean, I do have one with peanut butter too
but I like to have it with pickled radish, which is very weird. It’s just weird. I could see that happen. What about you Limei? Yeah, I would definitely try like your stuff,
like your recipe and like your recipe, but for me, I remember when I was a kid, I really
liked eating egg with sugar. So yeah like a hard-boiled egg or a fried
egg, but I just want to eat it with sugar. Do you just like…? Like sugar, yeah. Like, put it on after you cook it or while
you cook it? After I cook it. Don’t you put salt usually? Yeah, that’s mostly what I’m doing now. Do you put salt and sugar? Just sugar. Oh. I might try it out later, you know. Yeah, try it! Yeah, I want to experiment with it. So now we’re going to start our live chat
in about one minute. Please be logged in and get yourself comfortable
with everything you need. I have one last question for you guys. So, what concert would you like to attend
if you got the chance? Any concert. I would like to go to a Queen concert – like
Bohemian Rhapsody with all the crowd singing. Yes, like yes. Definitely Bob Marley on my part, go back
to the roots. Caribbean beat, like yeah, it would be absolutely
fantastic. That’s perfect. So, for me I would go for Elton John, having
watched the Rocketman movie recently. And one of my friends told me she met Elton
John in Kitchener, like, I think many years ago. That’s really great. That’s so exciting. So, now we are going to officially start our
third and final international student live chat. So hi everyone, again. I’m Limei and I’m currently a 3B Mathematics
student majoring in Financial Analysis and Risk Management. So, I come from China. Oh, it’s my turn. Hi everyone my name is Kealan. I am an International Development student
within the Faculty of Environment and I’ve lived all of my life in France and Trinidad. Hello everyone. My name is Shreena Maistry. I am an Environment and Business student here
at the Faculty of Environment as well. I come from a small island called Mauritius. So, you must be wondering why we are dressed
fancy today. Today, one of our topics is going to be about
jobs in Canada, so we wanted to dress the part for you. So what do you think? I love it Shreena. It’s wonderful. Yeah. Have you been getting modelling tips from
Kealan? I mean, yeah. She has, obviously. Did you know that Kealan is a professional model? He is. Show us. Show us. Show them, come on. Please, no. Show them. Come on. Get up. Yes! Fine, fine, okay. So let’s get up. There is one way to do it, and this is to
do it properly. Oh my god. I’m going to fall. And we’re going to do a walk around and
turn to the right and do a straight pose like this. And turn to the camera if you want. And then, do something a bit funnier like
this. Yes. Okay. One more final pose before we sit. There we go. You guys are great! It’s very natural for you, I have to work
hard. Not you. You guys are just naturals. Just like the salsa dancing from last time. You guys are very fast, quick learners. Thank you. Yeah. That took a lot out of me. [Laughter] Was it stressful? Lot’s of pressure. You put all the pressure on me, but it’s
all about growth, right? It’s about trying and working hard. It’s okay. Alright, let’s get set up. Well, it’s time for the activity now. We were wondering if you’re going to pack
any business outfits with you before you come to the University for your co-op or any job
in Canada if you’re interested. So let us know in the comments on the side,
and make sure that you’re messaging all participants as well. So, currently, right here, we are sitting
in the same place as Live Chat 2. So we are in Needles Hall in The Centre. So this is a go-to place where students go
to meet their administrative needs. So things like adding and dropping courses,
or any financial advice or needs, or ordering transcripts, this is the place to go. Yup. So, while you’re leaving us your comments,
I’m just going to recap what we did on Live Chat 2. So, we talked about fun ways to get involved
on campus and make sure that – I hope that you have been able to join the IPC the International
Peer Community. It’s going to be really fun and also don’t
forget to check out the Waterloo Undergraduate Student Association and Warrior Athletics
as well. So yeah. Now today. For the guideline of today, we are going to
be talking about classroom culture in Canada, tips for working in Canada, and also what
you need to know before you start your journey here as an international student. So just like last time send us your questions
through the chat and make sure that you’re messaging all participants as well. So if you’re having any technical issues don’t
forget to message the “Ask Us” panelist and we will assist you as soon as possible. Perfect. Speaking of lions at the beginning of our
live chat, today we would like to introduce today’s giveaway and today we will be giving
away King Warrior and a wonderful UWaterloo mug. King Warrior is our official mascot and you
will see King Warrior dressed up. Well, King Warrior is actually King Warrior,
there’s no one underneath it. He will be there at Orientation, make sure
you say hi. He will be there at Orientation, he will be
present at every varsity game on campus. We also have a wonderful notebook and a UWaterloo
pen for today’s giveaway, so please stay tuned and we will release the giveaway question
at the end of today’s segments so look out for that. Okay, so at the beginning Shreena asked all
of you whether you are going to bring your business attire to
Canada and I got some really great responses. I’m going to share some with you. So we have Saru saying, “yeah I am going
to bring two business suits” and Jaishree Bala says (sorry if I pronounce your name
wrong), “yes, I’m bringing one suit and planning to buy one more soon”. There are so many stores here near campus,
so you’re going to get what you want. And Shubhangi says, “yeah, I am also bringing
my business suits.” Great. And Kiarash says, “I’m probably going to
bring one or two of my suits with me”. That’s a good idea. Yeah, and Nishika and Saarang are also saying
they are going to bring like one suit or like a few more shirts and some formal suits. And Odianosen said, “I didn’t think we
needed to bring anything formal since co-op started the next term.” Well, from my personal experience, it’s
always never too late to prepare. So just get prepared and, whenever you need
it, you’re going to be ready. That’s all of the responses we’ve got
so far. Thank you for participating. So we’re going to have some more activities
coming up, so please make sure you participate in them and we are looking for your advice. There are some more questions about business
attire, so we will answer them at the end of the live chat. Thank you. So now, Shreena will share a territorial acknowledgement
with all of you. That’s great, well thank you for participating
everyone. So the territorial acknowledgement goes like
this. We want to acknowledge that right now we are
sitting on the traditional territory of the Neutral, Anishinaabeg and Haudenosaunee peoples. The University of Waterloo is situated on
the Haldimand Tract, the land promised to the Six Nations that includes ten kilometres
on each side of the Grand River. We believe that it is important to publicly
acknowledge the original inhabitants of the land as a step towards reconciliation, and
we wanted to introduce you to the territorial acknowledgement before you come to Canada
because they’re an important part of the University of Waterloo and in all of their
events. Thank you Shreena, and now we’re going to
start another activity. So our question will be what faculty will
you be joining and what program will you study? So please remember to leave your answers in
the comments and remember to message all participants. The question is what faculty will you join
and what will you study? And, on that note, we have invited Ryan Trelford
from the Faculty of Mathematics, which is my faculty, to tell us about the classroom
culture in Canada and about some differences between the classroom culture here and abroad. So if you have any questions please leave
them in the comments and remember to message all participants. We will try to get back to them at the end
of this interview session. So we are going to welcome Ryan here. Hello Ryan. Hi everyone. So hi Ryan, thanks for coming. Will you introduce yourself to the audience? Yeah, hi. So my name is Ryan Trelford. I am a lecturer in the Faculty of Mathematics
and I’m also an academic advisor there. Well perfect, thank you for joining us today
and before we start off we have a ritual joke segment for each of our panel members. So Ryan, tell us, why can’t angles secure
loans at the bank? No idea. Because the parents wouldn’t cosine (co-sign). Oh my gosh [laughter]. That’s pretty bad. It’s a dad joke. They approved it before. So Ryan, tell us what are some common surprises
of things that typical first-year students might experience? So, you know, coming from various backgrounds
around the world there’s lots of different things that students can experience that are
a bit different. The first one might be just the size of some
of your classrooms. A lot of students come from very, very small
towns or villages and they come to a classroom and there are 400 students in the classroom. That can be extremely overwhelming. Another thing that might be different from
high school is just how busy you’ll be. Typically, you take five courses in a term
and then you’re also doing, you know, homework, assignments, eating, sleeping, taking care
of yourself. It can become quite a busy day. Also the need to start looking after yourself,
you know, no one’s going to be chasing after you to eat breakfast or have a healthy dinner
so you have to start doing those things yourself. You know, setting up a reasonable bedtime
when lots of your friends want to go out and not sleep at all. So you have to start making decisions about,
you know, what I want to do versus what maybe I should be doing given that I’m here at university. So, these are some things that you will learn
to sort out as time goes on. Yeah, I remember when I came here, like I
said, back in China, we addressed the professors in a very formal way. I wouldn’t call you Ryan, but Professor
Trelford or like Mr. Trelford. But here, I noticed that many professors allow
their students to call them in a more casual way. So I can call you Ryan, and that is one difference
I had to adjust to and get used to. Yeah, most of the professors or instructors
that you’ll have will usually be pretty clear at the beginning of the semester how to address
them. I’m okay with my students calling me Ryan. I ask that they don’t call me sir because
it makes me feel old. I usually find about half of them call me
sir. Yeah, I would totally agree with that because
I had a hard time calling my professors by their first name. It’s just weird. It does offer more of an intimate connection
with the professor as well. It makes the students feel comfortable, even
though the class size may be really big, right. It definitely helps, for sure. But yeah, for me I had to adjust in terms
of a more digital environment. Back home, it was more of a traditional style:
notebook, dictating, taking notes, and writing on the whiteboard. But here, you can use things such as iClickers
for participating in class, and also we can access our slides on Learn, which is the University
of Waterloo Learning Management System that is a must for everyone. It’s the most essential tool that you’ll
have as a student. Yes, you get access to all the materials that
you need to succeed in a course during the duration of a semester and I realize that
a lot of emphasis is also placed on group assignments and teamwork. Those are essential qualities in the Canadian
workplace, which we will be talking about later in today’s live chat. So Ryan, could you tell us what are some tips
that you would give students to have a successful first year? So, to be successful the first thing and the
easiest thing is what you’re paying to be here for, is go to class. So many students go to the first two classes
and then just stop going. Going to class is your chance to have supposedly
an expert be able to explain to you the material in a way that hopefully goes beyond what the
textbook does or, you know, more insight than the textbook does. It’s why you’re coming here, so we really
do encourage you to be going to class. Another thing that we often tell our students
is to put out fires as they occur. So, this means that if there’s something you
don’t understand, don’t be afraid to put up your hand even in the large class. Put up your hand ask a question. If you’re not understanding it, at least a
third of the class is not understanding something. If you’re a bit shy in a large class and you
don’t want to don’t be afraid to go to the instructor after class. Just walk up to the front of the room and
say, you know – “I just had a quick question about…” “How does this work?” “I didn’t quite get what you were saying
there.” Instructors have office hours as well and
we encourage students to come for those. You’re welcome to sit down with the instructor
and have a bit of a lengthier conversation about some of the material that you might
be struggling with. So yeah, basically, going to class, being
on top of things, asking for help when you need it. Don’t let problems build up, because very
quickly you’ll find out that the thing you don’t understand requires 20 other things
that you also don’t understand. So we really want students to be on top, be
proactive about being on top of things. Another thing to realize is that from high
school you’re used to understanding probably everything class as it’s taught to you. In university that will change. You’ll leave a lecture sometimes not fully
understanding what happened, that’s totally normal. It’s not something to panic about, it doesn’t
mean that you shouldn’t be here. It means welcome to university. The level is quite a bit higher and again
addressing problems as they occur. Absolutely, I would totally agree with your
advice about talking about reaching out for help because for me and helped me in first
year. I remember my first semester I was a little
bit shy reaching out to my professors or TAs because I thought I would be embarrassed for
some reason. But please, like make sure that you’re going
to your professors, TAs, upper-year students, and even classmates. They will be able to help you. And there’s so many resources on campus. The only thing that you need to do is explore
and just go out there. Of course. Put yourself out there. One of the resources I’ve benefited from
the most since I arrived at university and also a person that has helped me a lot in
my transition from secondary school into university life would be my academic advisor. My academic advisor has helped me a lot for
course selection, has given me a lot of options to consider for a career path, and also gave
me a lot of valuable advice from a more professional background, I would say. So Ryan, how could a student benefit from
an academic advisor, no matter what faculty? Yeah so often times students will come and
see advisors and the biggest question we often get is what courses should I be taking. An academic advisor can tell you, you know,
where to look to see what kind of courses might be interesting to you, what courses
you have to take maybe, you know, order of prerequisites like, you can’t take that
course until you take these three courses so you should do these now so you graduate
on time. They can also help with petitions. So sometimes a student has a semester that
didn’t go nearly as well as they hope for various reasons; might be personal reasons,
health reasons, all sorts of different complications. So often times we’ll assist a student in maybe
trying to clear an academic term because of extenuating circumstances. So advisors will walk the students through
the process, tell them how it works, and see the process right through to the end. Thank you Ryan. So before coming back to the activity, you
know Kealan, Kiarash likes your dad jokes and said, “dad jokes for the win!” Maybe when he comes to campus, you two can
trade best dad jokes. You have a great sense of humour
and I love it. You guys can start a dad joke club. Go for it. Get in contact with me, maybe we could work
out something. Yeah, so at the beginning of this section
we asked, which faculty you are going to join and what will you study? And we got tons of replies. You guys are so great. We have the most people from Faculty of Arts. So we have Saru, Tanvi, and Gunpreet from
SAF, AFM. Marilyn and Quang, sorry Quang, and Tea from
Arts and Business and Marilyn from Political Science. We have Sahej and Selena from Economics. Shubhangi and Kiarash from Arts. So those are the responses from the Arts Faculty. That’s so great. And next we are going to have the people from
Engineering, so we are having Saarang, Ozan, Jaishree, Ravpreet, and Odianosen. I am so sorry if I pronounced your names wrong. I have to practice. We have a few people from Environment. So like Kealan and Shreena. We have Hisham and Eloise. Oh and Eloise is going to do a double major,
hoping to do a double major in theatre and performance. That’s so great. We have people from the Faculty of Science:
Anushka and Liliana. And, we have two more people from Faculty
of Math: Matthew and Priyanka. Hope you guys take Ryan’s lectures; he’s
a really great professor. And now Ryan, our audience seems to like you
very much. They have some questions for you. So, Sarah is asking how to adapt to the difference
of curriculum. The difference of curriculum. So, does that mean I guess from high school
to university? So I’m assuming how to transition. Like I mentioned before, coming to class,
being on top of things. You will find that university goes a little
bit faster. Often times, for instance, math students,
who often take calculus in high school are required to take calculus again in University. They find it quite a bit more challenging. They cover a lot of the same topics, but goes
quite a bit deeper. So, just being used to the fact that you’re
going to be pushed a little bit harder. You’re going to need to be on top of things. Reading ahead in a textbook can often help. Not so much that you understand a lecture
before you go to the lecture, but you know you have an idea of what’s coming, your mind
has a chance to process a little bit of the stuff. So, if you’re reading something and you’re
like, I don’t have any idea of what this is; when it comes up in the lecture you now know
that you should be really paying attention at this point. Hopefully things can become a bit more clear
and then just asking questions. Things will start to – you’ll get into the
rhythm and you’ll start to know what to do, and it’ll become a lot easier. So that first couple weeks, that transition
period is a little bit strange. A lot of things happening, a lot of dates,
a lot of different things that you need to do. But after a couple weeks everything starts
to become routine again. You’ll start to feel a lot better about things. Yeah, thank you and the next question is from
Eloise, who is asking, what sort of relationships do you build with your professors, TAs, etc? What kind of relationships depends entirely
on the instructor or the TA. Speaking for myself, I’m happy to chat with
students before class, so I usually come into class a little bit early. I kind of write on the board here’s what we
did last lecture, and then if students have questions they come up and ask things. I’ll just chat with some of the students in
the front row if they just want to talk about whatever. I’m happy to meet them outside of class. Sometimes students will come in to be like,
what kind of research do you do, and I get a chance to talk about what it is that I like
to do, which isn’t happening very often. But I’m very happy to discuss that type of
stuff with students. So, you kind of get a feel with each instructor
where the bounds are, what you can talk about maybe, you know, and what you’re comfortable
talking about. So, it’s really hard to say in general, but
once you meet with your instructor you kind of get a feel for it, or you know what kind
of relationship you can have. Yes, so for me, I feel it really depends on
the individuals. In the meantime, you can check for office
hours and even if you wanted some advice on the field your professor is specialized in;
it’s always good to check with them. Like not just the class content, but sometimes
you’ll get more than you think. We have the next question from Quang saying,
“How to voice up in the classroom when I am 300% introverted?” How do… How do you voice up in the classroom? Oh, yes okay. So yes we do have, especially the factory
math, we have a lot of very shy students. So if speaking up in the classroom is not
something that you’re comfortable with, that’s okay. We’re not going to try to embarrass you or
put you on the spot. This is a chance for you to, after class come
up and ask the instructor if you have any questions or maybe catch them right before
lecture, and if you have a quick question about maybe something that happened in the
previous lecture, you’re allowed to go to office hours. A lot of classes have teaching assistants,
or TAs, and so you can also talk to them and maybe if you’re a bit intimidated by a professor,
maybe start talking with the TA first and then kind of work your way up to the professor. As far as talking to your fellow classmates,
that’s something that ultimately you’re going to have to learn how to do, if you want to
have success in university. One of the great things we have is an orientation
week, where students are allowed to come to the university a bit early. They’re grouped by faculty and they’re put
into smaller groups. They’re forced to get to know people in a
very safe, comfortable environment. Also on the first day of class when you walk
into that classroom, no matter how big it is, you’re going to see a bunch of people
all talking. Don’t assume that they’re already old friends. They are actually all introducing themselves
to each other. This is a chance for you to do the same. Don’t forget, everyone else is nervous too,
so don’t feel like you’re different somehow. Take a chance, just say hi to the person beside
you, you never know, they could become a really good friend. I would totally agree with that because, for
me, coming from Mauritius, I didn’t have anyone coming from Mauritius in the Faculty of Environment,
so I had to get used to different cultures, different backgrounds. So definitely the first point was making friends
at orientation, talk with classmates. The only thing that it takes is like, “Hi! How are you?” And that’s it! The conversation just flows automatically. Don’t worry about it. You’ll be fine. Exactly. Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there. You might feel silly about just walking up
to a random person and saying hi. But hey, do it for yourself. You’re going to meet a ton of great people
at International Orientation and also meet a lot of people who will be able to help you
and go through the same thing you are going through. It makes the process a lot more fun when you
have other people around you to, you know, to laugh about the experiences of missing
home and all these different things. It does help a lot. If you have an 8:30 a.m. lecture you can just
complain to the person beside you about that. That’s usually a good conversation starter. Yeah exactly. Or, talk about where you’re from. Like for me, explaining where Mauritius is,
that’s the only thing that starts a conversation. Yeah, that’s very cool. So the next question is from Saru who is asking,
“What assistance is available for completing assignments?” Ah, that’s a good question. A lot of students aren’t always aware of all
the help that they have. So the first and foremost is your instructor. They’re probably the ones that made the assignments
and can help you. So that would involve asking a quick question
before or after lecture, or maybe going to their office hours, which are usually posted
online, and the instructor will direct you to those. Teaching Assistants can also help if the course
has one. Peers, you know we do allow students and expect
students to work together. A word of caution with that, usually the instructor
of the course will be very clear at the beginning about what level of collaboration is allowed. So sometimes we do expect that students aren’t
collaborating at all and sometimes we expect that they collaborate fully on the assignment
or project or whatnot. So just be aware of those rules first before
you start talking about how you’re going to solve or what the answers are. We don’t want students getting into academic
trouble. Also we have tutorial centres. I know, for instance, the Faculty of Math
has a dedicated tutorial centre where graduate TAs are in there helping out. I think Mackenzie King Village has a tutorial
centre as well. So one of the residences has it. Also there are tutors available. So sometimes you’ll see postings around your
faculty about tutors. Oftentimes in your undergraduate office, we’ll
have a list of official tutors as well. So there is help, but sometimes you have to
pay a little extra for that help. So before you wash off and start spending
money on tutors and things like that, definitely talk to your instructor to see if they agree
that maybe they think you need that or if maybe it’s just a couple of simple problems
that you’re having, if those are cleared up, then there’s no need to spend any extra money. Yes. I remember there are so many different services
for different faculties. So for me I always go to the Math Tutorial
Centre and discuss the questions with the TAs. And like for the Engineering Faculty, they
have the learning community in the residence, where they can have some like TA tutorials
there. So there are definitely many resources. Please make sure you check them. And next we have a question. So on top of that, Nishika is asking, “How
to excel at midterms and finals?” Yes. So, I find there’s two different types of
students. There’s the ones that will study all semester. So when they have free time, they sit down
and they study, they’re active in their education. These students, when the midterm or the final
exam comes up, they’re pretty much already ready. They will inevitably ask for more questions
anyway, so that’s fine. There’s the other end of the spectrum, I suppose,
where you have students that aren’t really actively participating in their education. They’re doing the assignments, they’re doing
the things, but they’re not really thinking about it. They’re just kind of doing it and handing
it in. Then the night, or the day before the midterm,
they start studying and suddenly realize that they’re not nearly as prepared as they hoped. So we do encourage students to study early,
study often. One thing that I like to start doing now is,
instead of having weekly assignments, I have weekly quizzes. This really forces the student to constantly
study all the time. The feedback I’ve gotten from my students
is that they’re actually enjoying it. They feel more prepared for the midterm. I noticed a definite drop in anxiety about
the midterm. So it seems to be a very good idea on my part,
at least from what I’ve seen. So again I encourage you just to always be
working and making sure that you’re understanding, keeping up current with the material. Don’t let things slide. Don’t fall behind. Great tips for my midterm tomorrow [laughter]. Make sure you remain consistent and do not
procrastinate. It’s very tempting. Yeah, and next we’re going to have several
questions from Odianosen. So Odianosen’s asking, “What’s the difference
between a tutorial and a lecture? On top of that, “Are lecture lessons posted
on the Learn platform so that if you miss a class you can catch up from there?” So it’s two questions. What’s the difference between a tutorial and
a lecture and are lessons posted on Learn? So yeah you’ll notice on your schedule sometimes
it says LEC, sometimes it says TUT. So a lecture is where you go to be taught
by the instructor – the material of the course. A tutorial is often attached to a
lecture section. That is usually often run by a TA. What happens there depends entirely on the
course and what the instructor wants. So in my tutorials now, students write quizzes. Other tutorials, the TA may just solve problems
on the board if it’s a math tutorial and they’re not doing a quiz or anything like that. So it’ll be like, here are some problems,
I’m going to solve them. Or you work on them, then we’ll take up
the solutions together. Other faculties, their courses may have different
uses for tutorials. It totally depends. But the idea is that you’re supposed to
be either showing that you’ve learned the material or doing things that help you fortify
all of the knowledge that you’ve taken in so far. Yes and now we’re going to have two questions
regarding changing courses or like changing the lecture sections. So Hisham is asking, “Can we change our
courses? and Odianosen is asking, “If you don’t really vibe with your professor’s
teaching style, is it easy to change your professors, or like how badly will it mess
up your schedule?” Yeah, and these rules vary by faculty. So in the Math Faculty, students take usually
the same three math courses. They take two math and one CS. There’s different variations there. But you can’t really get it wrong. So when it comes to changing courses (maybe
there’s a time you don’t like), what you need to do is go on to Quest and we really recommend
you swap courses. So the idea there is when you swap you tell
them the course you want to drop and then you tell them the course you want to add and
it instantly changes. The problem with dropping and then adding
separately is that if you drop a course you’re now out of everything. Then, if the course you want suddenly fills
up because somebody else is doing the same thing and then the course you were in suddenly
fills up because somebody wanted that, now you’re in a bit of a “pickle”. So we really encourage students to be swapping. So you can see the schedules and things like
this on Quest. Typically when a class is full, that’s full
and we don’t often put students into a full class because it’s a fire hazard to have more
students in a room than the room’s capacity. So the other thing is, students are all swapping
courses all over the place. So if the course that you want or the section
that you want is full, keep checking on Quest. You know, eventually you’re going to find
out that somebody else has swapped out and that’s your chance to swap in. But it does involve a little bit of effort
on your part to keep checking. Yeah, I would definitely advise swapping instead
of dropping because my friends have been all over the place. It’s very common not to get into classes just
because you’ve dropped it and then you add it after because everyone is doing that at
any time. Also, if you cannot navigate through Quest
or anything, the information is available on the University website. Also, if you’re even having difficulties
with your courses, your best resource is, or the first point of contact would be, your
academic advisor. Right, and also one of the things that, in
my experience, I’ve realized too is, in the event if you do want to take a class,
the class might be full, but the class is a bit smaller than the lectures of two- to
three-hundred students, you can request your academic advisor to give you an override form
with permission that asks directly to the instructor to be enrolled in the class if
someone drops out. So, if someone drops out, you would be in
that priority list to join the class. So consider that as a viable option, and speak
to your academic advisor if you want more information on that as well. If you have an instructor that maybe you’re
not kind of understanding what they’re saying and things like that, you have usually I think
about two weeks into the course that you can keep swapping. So keep checking and see if anything else
fits your schedule. Other than that, the instructor typically
isn’t the thing that makes or breaks the course. So if an instructor’s teaching in a way
that maybe is new to you, or challenges you a little bit, that’s not necessarily a bad
thing. Learning in different ways will actually benefit
you and help you in the future when you have a job and your employer tells you to do something
a certain way or explain things a certain way. You can’t easily just go to a different employer
and ask them to explain it differently. So part of it is just learning and adapting
to the cards you’re dealt, I suppose. It’s not bad if the instructor isn’t exactly
teaching the way you learn, you can learn to understand them as well. Cool. So Avinash is asking, “Do all assignments
given in class contribute to your final grade?” So, this will, again, vary from course to
course. At the beginning of the semester, you’ll
get a course outline. The instructor will walk through everything
with you. Oftentimes you’ll have weekly assignments
or weekly quizzes. These will count towards your final grade
typically. Oftentimes instructors will take the best
eight out of ten assignments. So if something happens where you’re sick
for a week or you just had an exam where you’re so busy you couldn’t really study for it,
we usually let students have a freebie every now and then. Life happens. We understand that as well. Again, this varies from instructor to instructor. Some will say all assignments are worth marks. Some will say, nope, none of these are for
marks, but you better do them because it’s your practice for the midterm. So again, this involves a little bit of maturity
on the students part to actively participate in their education. Yes. So I remember for me, some assignments were
just totally a bonus mark, some were one percent of the final grade, and I had some that were
seventy or eighty percent of the final grade. So it really varies from course to course. And just now we were talking about the difference
between a tutorial and a lecture, and Nishika is also wondering, “What exactly is a seminar
and how is that different from lecture?” I don’t believe we have seminars in the Math
Faculty. Do any of you? I think there’s seminars in the Engineering
Faculty because my friend has talked about it before. Yeah, I don’t know much about them. I’m sorry. It’s not a thing that I deal with personally. I don’t know if it’s maybe a place where
like maybe Engineering has like someone from industry come in and talk to the class in
a seminar for a bit and say here’s my experiences transitioning from university to the real
world. I think it’s more of a place where you can
get information about university and the work world and things like that, but it could,
again, vary from faculty to faculty. To my knowledge, I feel like seminars are
– the credits are a little bit higher just because you have to be present there. I mean it doesn’t apply to all seminars,
again. So it depends on the courses you’re doing
and I’m pretty sure your faculty website will have more information about that. So make sure you check that out. Yes. And Manav is asking, “When is AP transfer
credits applied so that you can drop the class you’ve gained credit for?” Yeah, so, transfer credits are basically,
they’re – you apply, you get accepted, you send them the courses you’ve done, the course
descriptions. Those are distributed to the faculties, they’re
reviewed over a couple weeks’ period, it comes back to the Registrar’s Office, and
then they write up a document that will be sent to you. If you’ve sent in your course descriptions
already, they’re being looked at. It just takes a bit of time. Sometimes it can be quite a bit of work to
assign transfer credits. Yeah, fortunately for me I remember having
my transfer credits a little bit close to me joining the University, so don’t worry
about it. They are being reviewed and you will get an
official document saying that you have earned these transfer credits for these courses and
then they will walk you through the steps of what to do next. And normally it will be a personal email. Right and in my experience too, for those
who are writing A levels, you may have to actively seek out your academic advisor to
find out if you are qualified for any transfer credits in first year because I had to do
that. Yeah, so thank you. That’s all of our questions for Ryan. Thank you to all the participants. Please keep shooting us questions or anything
in the chat section for the next interview. And so
Ryan, is there anything else you want to share with international students before they come
Canada. Yeah, so I know we have a couple orientations. There’s International Orientation, which I
think you should really go to and then there’s our regular orientation (First-Year Orientation),
which is with all the students. I really strongly encourage you to go to these. You’ll get a lot of useful information about
how the University runs. A lot of students who don’t go to these events
later on run into roadblocks where they’ve done something that a student who’d gone to
orientation would have known not to do. I think it’s usually three or four days, the
orientation. A great chance to meet people, and meet people
in your faculty, and meet people even from different faculties. So really a good chance to get you kind of
acclimated to university life and so you’re a little bit more prepared, a little more
confident when you get to your actual first class. Another piece of advice is a lot of students
ask about what’s the easiest possible course that I can take. Oftentimes the students maybe don’t have the
highest average that maybe that they were expecting when they came here. My advice always is, the easiest course is
often something that you’re interested in. So a lot of you will be in Arts, a lot of
you will be in Environment, some will be in Math, CS, things like this. Try to seek actively something outside of
your major that really interests you. So if you’re in Math and suddenly you want
to learn German, well you have a perfect chance to start taking German courses and learn German. If you’re really interested, you will naturally
want to learn and want to study, be on top of it, probably have good grades, and if you
do enough courses outside of your major in a specific discipline you can actually get
a minor and this usually goes on your degree when you graduate. And it’s a thing that can set you apart from
other people applying to the same jobs as you with the same degree. If you have a minor, it kind of puts you up
a little bit. It also you know personalizes your degree
a little bit. That’s perfect. So if you would like any more information
on Canadian classroom culture, there’s some links in the chat, and make sure to check
them out. So thank you Ryan for joining us today. It was really nice. Thank you for having me. Bye. Alright, take care. Thanks. Bye! Alright so now we will move onto the next
segment of today’s live chat, and it will be tips for working in Canada. We want to find out if any of you are in a
co-op program or planning to work in Canada. We would like to welcome Fatima to the panel
today. Hi Fatima. Hi. Before we move into our segment with Fatima,
I’d like to talk briefly about my experience working in Canada. I’ve had the opportunity to work with the
Athletics and Recreation Department as a Student Trainer, as a Warrior Recreation Ambassador. And we wanted to let you know as a team, that
so many departments on campus do present opportunities for international students to work part-time
in various capacities. So when you get here, check those opportunities
out, and yeah read up on the resources with regards to that. So hi Fatima. Hi, thank you for having me. Absolutely, it’s our pleasure. Yeah, thank you for being here. So Fatima could you tell us more about the
services at the Centre for Career Action? Sure, so at the Centre for Career Action,
we are here to motivate and work with you towards achieving your career goals. We do this through appointments, events, and
workshops. We cover several topics including resumes,
cover letters, interviews, as well as work search and career exploration. So please feel free to drop in and see us. And could you tell us more about the role
that you play in the Centre for Career Action? Yeah, so as you know my name is Fatima. I’m an international student as well from
Nigeria, and I’m a Student Career Leader. So I do facilitate some of the drop-in sessions. I work with the students to review their resumes,
cover letters, and I do mock interview sessions. So I help students practice with their interviews. I’ve also worked on several international
projects for the Centre for Career Action as well. Yeah, so while our participants are answering
whether they’re in a co-op program or planning to work part-time in Canada, could you tell
us how you would describe the Canadian workplace culture to international students? Yeah, that’s a great question. No two Canadian workplaces are exactly the
same, but they do share a few things in common. The first one would be that Canadian companies
expect their employees to be good at communication and interpersonal relations. So this includes active listening and speaking,
collaborating, especially with your colleagues and supervisor. The next thing is that Canadian workplaces,
they welcome questions. So they welcome questions and new ideas, they
consider this a sign of engagement with the work you are doing. Something else they also value in Canada in
general, is equality. So they expect every employee to be respectful
of everyone’s differences, and also to treat everyone with fairness. And last but not the least, is punctuality. So usually when a meeting is scheduled for
a certain time, they expect everyone to be a few minutes early. Absolutely. Definitely, soft skills are very embraced
generally in Canadian culture. I’ve worked in my first co-op work term
and as a part-timer as well. So there are little bits, like punctuality
or communication skills, these are very valued here. And yeah, being professional, in terms of
the way you dress, the way you talk, the way you address. Just being very diplomatic in the workplace. Right. So you mentioned that skills like teamwork
and communication are very important in the Canadian workplace, and I have observed that
in my own experience too as I’ve been working in Canada in part-time jobs, and undertaking
summer jobs, and also as I will be going to Peru next year. Those experiences I’ve had, I know will
help me a lot in the future, but Fatima are there any skills that you think Canadian managers
or employers would be, you know, would stress a lot of importance on? Yeah, so Canadian workplaces value two main
categories of skills. We do have hard and soft skills. So hard skills are also known as technical
skills. This refers to skills that are specific to
a certain job, or industry, or a role. An example of this skill would be the ability
to code and analyze data if you’re in Math or CS, and the ability to operate a machine
or laboratory equipment if you’re in Science or Engineering. And also the ability to maybe master a foreign
language if you’re in Arts, International Development, things like that. Those are considered hard skills because they
are specific. Another type of set of skills we have are
soft skills, also known as transferable skills. These skills are not specific to any industry
or job, and an example would be teamwork skills that you mentioned. And problem-solving skills, collaboration
skills, organization skills. Sometimes Canadian employers value, they do
value soft skills sometimes as equally as hard skills, or sometimes even more because
they feel that your hard, technical skills can be taught on the job. They can teach you how to do these things
when you come into the company. But, your soft skills are an indication of
how well you can fit into the role and the team to start with. So I would say, it’s always good to work
on both. Absolutely, a combination of both is very
essential generally in a workplace because it helps for you to communicate your ideas. For example, there’s no point of view of
like knowing like coding, or in technical skills, where you cannot communicate with
other people who don’t have the background knowledge of it. So a combination is very much valued by Canadian
employers, and that’s what you should work towards. Yeah, so back to you. We have some great responses in the chat. So there are a lot of students in co-op, including
Gunpreet, Faizaan, Eloise, Tinotenda, Shubhangi, Quang, Zhiyu, Nishika,and Odianosen (oh this
name is really familiar). And Amanjot, Chinonye, and Kiarash. And yeah, Kiarash says I’m hoping to work
part-time and then start co-op from second year. So, and then we have some questions for Fatima. And we have a lot of questions for you. So we have Anushka is asking, “If your co-op
term starts in the second year or later, is it necessary to bring a formal attire in the
first year?” Oh, so that’s a good question. So usually formal attire depends. Again, you never know what job you’re going
to apply for part-time. And formal attire is what you use for interviews. But you could start by doing some of your
research. So what kind of positions or industries do
you want to go in to? Then, what kind of attire do they usually
wear there? That would help you decide what you need. Yeah, absolutely. For example, like it depends where you’re
working. For example, in a corporate setting, it would
be more formal wear like what we are wearing, but in a start-up, it would be more casual,
like t-shirts and jeans. So definitely doing some research on what
is the work environment like, and also, it’s always nice to have at least one set of formal
attire when you’re coming. Just because, not only for interviews or for
co-op jobs specifically, but if there’s networking events on campus happening. Or if you’re wanting to meet with someone
in a formal setting, it’s always useful to have it on hand as well. Yes, I have like a piece of personal experience
I want to share with you. So I remember in my 1A term, I had a Math
networking event. At that time I was so lucky that I had brought
up business attire with me. My friend had to borrow from her sister. So it’s always good to have something ready. And next we have – Nishika is asking, “How
can you be a person that an interviewer remembers after the interview?” Oh, that’s nice. So that’s a good question. Dress nicely. First impression counts. True, first impression counts, but also there
are different aspects in interviewing and this is something you
could come in and we could coach you on. But again it’s also making your answers memorable. Usually people remember someone that shows
that they’re prepared and you’re giving, you know, sound and well
thought out answers to the questions. A simple thing that people could also do to
make themselves memorable is also send a thank you note after the interview. So after the interview’s all done, you could
send them a note saying, you know, it was nice chatting with you today and kind of briefly
remind them of the skills you talked about and things you’re going to contribute. They will always remember that. Right, and one other thing I would highly
recommend is that you get familiar also with the organization’s culture, as Shreena mentioned
earlier, and also the company’s values and mission statement and make sure that when
you go into the interview, you’re well prepared, and your answers are well aligned to what
the company is looking for. Absolutely, I would totally agree, because
in the interview, there’s not a specific thing that will make them remember you. It’s the whole interview, the whole 20 minutes
or an hour that you spend with that employer. It’s from the first point that you walk
in and right till the end. So you need to maintain that good professional
attitude. Your answer should be clear and very nicely
laid out for the employer. There are
little bits, the combination of all of them makes an interview very memorable. And practice makes perfect. Yes, practice makes perfect. So on top of that, Quang and Jaishree both
asked how to build a good resume and be confident in an interview. Great, so again, I’ll just start with the
interview part. Being confident means practicing and also
sometimes it’s easier to do something if you’ve done it over and over again. And how to build a good resume, good. The first thing I would say is – the first
thing to think about, again, is what position and industries do you want to go in to? What skills or experiences are those roles
requiring? Which of them do you have already? Make a list of those ones, and also make a
list of the ones you might benefit from gaining before you apply to this job. And then you could get started on writing
this all. And we do have a platform that can guide you
called Career Hub. So you could just go and log in and go to
the Apply/Interview section. We have tons of information on how to structure
your resume, what goes on in each section. And your resume, it’s not just about work
experience, it’s about all your experiences. So, this includes school projects, things
you learned in workshops, things you learned in summer camp, things you even learned by
your own, on your own. This could include like online classes and
so on. And we do have appointments and drop-ins for
that, so if you have any questions, please feel free to stop in. Yeah and Nishika also had the same question
about how to be confident in an interview and I hope Fatima has answered your question. And Varun is asking a question that I personally
resonated a lot with. So Varun’s saying, “I am a student from
Oman. I have no previous work experience and haven’t
done any volunteering outside of my school. Is there anything I should be doing to cover
for my lack of experience in that area?” So, I would say that when employers talk about
experience, they don’t mean just work experience. So the experience could come from science
projects you’ve done in school, experience could come from personal projects. So, especially a lot of the people in programming,
they do a lot of coding on their own or robotics, and that looks good on their resume. So experience comes from several areas. It could come from a conference or something
you’ve learned in class. I would say that – something else you could
do if you decide that you also want to try your hand in volunteering or working part-time,
we have lots of opportunities on campus. You could work with the Waterloo Undergraduate
Student Association. They have over 200 clubs you could volunteer
with, so there are different opportunities for you to get involved with. Yeah absolutely. I remember I was so panicked when I came here. I was like, my friends know me and I was just
telling them that, oh my god I don’t have any Canadian experience, nobody’s going to
employ me or anything. But definitely, when I had interviews I was
discussing school projects that I had, positions that I held in high school, so those are the
only experiences that I can rely to, and they actually worked, so you’re not going to be
penalized just not having experience. It depends what you define experience as. Right, and I would just stress the importance
of getting involved in something as soon as you get
to campus. In my first year, I was a volunteer for the
International Development Conference that my program hosts every year and it’s entirely
student-run. Then second year, I was an Operations Director,
and then third year, I was a Co-Conference Chair for the conference. It’s very important to hit the ground running
and just explore options that you have available to you. Don’t limit yourself; put yourself out there. We have a lot of clubs and societies, even
societies, I’m sure, available in your faculty as well. So explore those options. Speak to an academic advisor and also get
familiar with the format of the Canadian resume and so – because the thing is, in first year
I came here with a C.V. and it’s a lot different from what the Canadian managers and employers
are looking for. They want to see something that’s concise,
that just summarizes all of your work experiences in you know a very concise manner. So, take advantage of those services in the
Career Action Centre. The Centre for Career Action. That’s it. Yeah, I wish I would have known all of this
advice before starting my first job search. Next we have two questions relating to international
experience, like international co-op experience. So Odianosen asked earlier in the chat, “Can
students do their co-op terms in their home countries?” and Saru is asking, “How to
apply for international experience through co-op?” Okay. Great. So we do have international co-ops. I’d say that you could start by going to our
website. We do have a section for international – the
co-op website – we have a section on international co-op, where you can learn about how to apply
for international co-ops. I believe some of them do come on WaterlooWorks. But I’d say the best resource would be to
also speak to your co-op advisor. Tell them that, these are my co-op goals and
how do I go about achieving them. Yeah, so Nishika is asking, “How to network
effectively at networking events?” Nice. Dress Nicely. We understand that networking is also part
of the process, and it’s important in finding the right jobs. We do have resources on networking on Career
Hub, but what I would say is that, again, first identifying the kind of environment
you want to be networking in, what field or industries. Practice your personal pitch. So, how do you intend to introduce yourself
to these people you want to network with. What do you want to learn from them and also,
what do you have to offer? Also, we do have students who want to have
access to their own business cards, so you can get yours made, you can get access from
the Centre for Career Action website. I think it’s under additional resources. You could order your own business cards so
it’s ready for you when you come on campus and you could use this for networking, yeah. Perfect. So we’re going to have some questions regarding
the mock interviews. So Jaishree is asking, I’m sorry – Navya
is asking, “Is there any limit to the mock interviews for co-op?” and Tinotenda is
asking, “Can I do mock interviews in first year even if I am starting work in second
year?” Yes, yes. We do have, for the first month of every term,
we have our drop-ins from 8:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. So you can come for as many 15 minutes sessions
as you want to practice mock interviews. If you want to book an hour-long appointment
you can also book that on WaterlooWorks and you can practice right from the first day
if you want. We just advise that during the busy period,
you just limit it to one session per day just so we can attend to everyone. Yeah, you could practice as much as you want. So please feel free to stop by. That’s cool. I remember my in first year, I went for my
mock interview at the Centre for Career Action and I met a Career Advisor, like you, so she
gave me so many advice and I went for drop-ins which is 15 minutes long and also one hour
long. Both of them are very helpful, especially
I was like a little bit anxious about my first co-op work-term. It’s definitely helpful. You’ll get a lot of advice, how can you
improve, and what are the steps to proceed further. Yeah, last but not least, we have Jaishree
asking, “What extra things can we do to make sure we land good co-op jobs?” That’s good, and I’d say the first thing
to do is start early. So usually the co-op application process has
deadlines, and it’s not always best to start a few hours before a deadline, so as early
as you can, always start early. And again, do your own research. What kind of jobs do you want to apply for? Make sure that you are highlighting those
skills. And also, it goes back to highlighting those
skills. Sometimes we meet with students who have done
so many fabulous things, but they don’t always remember to put everything on their
resume. So it’s always good to take a good, you know,
inventory of all the things you’ve done. Nothing is too big or too small. So everything you’ve done. We always say you know, first put everything
down. Don’t think about it, you know, just put everything
down first and then we can tailor your documents to meet the job. So I’d say, start early and do not discount
any experience. Yeah, well thank you Fatima. If you have any more questions please check
out the website for the Centre for Career Action. There are a lot of great resources there and
make sure that you make use of them. Thank you for joining us today. Thank you Fatima! Bye Everyone! Thank you, Fatima. We look forward to meeting you at Orientation
and feel free to visit us at the Centre for Career Action. Thank you. Bye. Alright, so at this point and time, we are
coming to almost the end of today’s live chat, but before we go on we would like to
just give you a reminder of the Countdown to Campus video series available to you on
YouTube. It’s a free resource that will be made available
to you also by links posted in the chat description. The Countdown to Campus series is a visual
representation, a reminder that life at Waterloo is not entirely based on academia. It’s also based on extracurricular activities,
that you can have together with your peers and all of that. So make sure to check out that free resource
that’s available to you. They are very funny, extremely informative
as well, and they have a good account of what life is at the University through the students’
perspective. Yeah, absolutely, and they’re short. So don’t worry, they will not take much
of your time. Just go and check out the Countdown to Campus
videos. So you will get information such as like immigration
consulting, health services, and what can you do with the health insurance, and also
things like what can you do with your WatCard. It’s not just a University card. You can do a lot of things if you know the
secrets. Also, what “Fees Arranged” means and so
much more. Yes, so now we have some great questions from
the participants through the live chat. And we have, Quang asked earlier in the chat,
“How to not get lost on campus?” So, there is a Portal app and there are some
print maps available, which you can make use of to find your way and you can also check
on Google Maps. Absolutely! But before we go on, we’ve got to give away
this boy right here, King Warrior with a notepad to take down notes in lectures with a UWaterloo
pen. Yeah and the question will be: What super
power would you want to have while in Canada? So the question will be: What super power
you want to have while you’re in Canada? So please leave your answers in the comments
and remember to message all participants. We’re going to choose the most creative
one as the winner. So with that being said, Kealan and Shreena
what would be your answers for this question? Like, what super power? So, I know I’ve wanted to be a lion all
of my life, when we spoke earlier about animals, but during the cold winter months, you know,
flying down South, like more southern and warmer places would be ideal, so transforming
into one of our geese-friends and going down there and then coming back during the warm
months. But I’d have to come back for lecture. Yeah, absolutely. I would go back to the same thing. I want to travel to somewhere warm, but instead
I think I’m just going to, I just want to be Elsa, so I can say, “the cold never bothered
me anyway”. I just really want – I’ll build my ice castle,
we could all live together and just enjoy winter. But yeah, that would be my superpower. Yeah, so think about the most suitable superpower
that will help you in your life in Canada. Yeah, so while you guys are busy typing, we’re
going to continue answering some questions from all of you. Besides what was asked before, like how not
to get lost on campus (we have the Portal app and printed maps available), Saketh is
asking, “I have only 10 minutes between classes. Is there anything that will help with travelling?” Normally, the campus is pretty close by and
definitely check how far is one class from the other. You should be able to get from one side of
– because like, if you get from one side of the campus to the other, it takes around 20
minutes-ish, fifteen minutes by walking, so it shouldn’t be that far. Also, even if you go five minutes late or
probably leave a little bit earlier, it always helps. So don’t worry. It will be fine. A lot of professors know that they have to
end at the stipulated time because students have to go to another lecture, so that 10
minute window is usually enough for you to get from one part of campus to the other. During the winter months, make sure to walk
with your ski poles and everything – just kidding. You don’t need ski poles during Winter! We have tunnels available from most buildings
to the other. So make sure when you get here to speak to
your Orientation leaders about them, and they’d be happy to take you through the tunnels and
show you how you can get from one building to the next in the cold winter months. And also there are volunteers who actually
do campus tours. Make sure, if you can go with them, take little
notes on where, oh good, I saw the library, now I need to take this path. So just make some notes and eventually you’ll
be accustomed with the campus. Yeah and now, Kealan and Shreena, you won’t
believe that we have so many amazing great answers for the giveaway question. We’ll go through them and pick the one you
think would be the most creative one. Okay, okay. So Nishika is answering, “I want to save
myself from the cold.” and Jaishree is saying, “To remain warm even in the winters.” Quang is saying, “The power of not saying
sorry all the time.” Oh gosh. That’s never going to happen. I’m sorry. I mean for me, I was contaminated. I say sorry all the time now. I cannot go back, I don’t know. Yeah, Selena is saying, “Teleporting so
I can get to my classes quickly.” That’s a good idea. I think we’re going to be friends. Yeah teleporting together. Harsh is saying, “Protect myself from the
geese.” Okay. They’re vicious, aren’t they? Stuart is saying, “My super power would
be able to talk to the geese.” I would like that too. Manav is saying, “The power to hibernate
at will.” I mean, I could do that as well. It’s already inside of some people. Yeah, second nature. Wait until final exams come; it’s going
to be very easy to just snooze, anyway. Enthusiasm! Srija is saying, “To never procrastinate.” Okay. I love that. I wish. And Navya is saying, “The power to go through
all the challenges successfully by leaving a significant mark on the University.” Oh my god, that is so nice. I won’t even say that’s a power, that’s
a possibility. Yes, yes. You can do it. Yes, it is very much achievable. You can do it, and you will do it. So, Hisham is saying, “The power of not
getting bored during lectures.” Yeah. I wish, but yeah you need to just have like
a bottle of water to wake you up all the time, or coffee. And a double-double. Yeah double-double. How dare you forget the double-double. Yes. Musa is saying, “Teleporting to class when
it is -20 degrees outside so I will not have to go outside.” Yeah, I wish, I wish. Yeah, Odianosen is saying, “Relive great
moments I experienced at the University.” Yes and Sahej is saying, “The power to talk
with various people.” Yeah, that is a power I want; to learn different
languages so you can always communicate with different people. And practice, you can make this power your
reality. Don’t worry. You’ll be able to talk to everyone when
you come here. Yes, Saru is saying, “Be, ubiquitous, I
don’t know what that means.” What is it? Ubiquitous, so visit all landmarks, fly over
the Niagara. So the ability to fly, I guess. Yeah, I fully relate to that. Yeah. Okay, you could fly together. Yeah exactly. In a flock of geese. So it’s gaggle on the floor. Flock in the air. Yeah and Saru is also saying, “Be full of
heat and energy both physically and academically.” Yes, always enthusiastic. Eloise is saying, “I’d have a social networking
power to get over anxiety and being an introvert, so I can get co-op interviews nailed and also
meet new people.” Wow that’s a big one, Eloise. Yes. And Nikisha is saying, “Power to not get
lost on campus. You’ve got Portal and the maps you won’t
get lost.” And Tina is asking, sorry saying, “The power
of being able to know all the things.” I wish, all the things. Or you could be like John Snow and not know
anything. You know, Game of Thrones Season 8 just keeps,
like, messing with my head. He really didn’t know anything. He didn’t know anything. So, let’s get back to our audience. Saarang is saying, “I want a super power
to make the geese friendly and the power to teleport in order to escape a geese attack
and never get late.” Yes. Oh gosh. Who is this? Saarang. I like that. I like that. Raksha is wanting the power to control weather. Oh please. Please! Oh yeah, that would be great. And Nishika also wants the power to be invisible
to the geese. Oh so we have so many people wanting powers
for the geese. And Keith is saying, “My superpower would
be to be able to instantly speak and understand the native language of anyone I’m talking
to in Canada, since there are so many people from many different places and they’re in
Canada now.” I mean it’s a multicultural society, you’ll
have a lot of languages to learn, but that’s a power to go for. I like that. I like that too, yeah. Last but not least, we have Harsh saying,
“The superpower to have all superpowers one can imagine.” That’s amazing yes. Absolutely. So from all these responses, what would be
the winner for you? I’m going to say either the ability to speak
to the geese or be invisible to the geese, is it? Oh yeah, the combination of speaking to the
geese and being able to teleport in case of a geese attack. Any geese related super power, I fancy. So since I have the tablet, I’m going to
pick the winner. For me, I also like the answer with the super
power to make the geese friendly and the power to teleport from the geese. So I will choose Saarang as the winner. Congratulations, you have won yourself King
Warrior and a mug to take with you to lectures during the school winter months, a notepad,
and a University of Waterloo pencil. Congratulations! So Saarang please remember to private message
the Ask Us panelists with your email address. We will keep all of these for you until you
arrive in Canada. So that’s going to be the end of our live
chat. And Kealan’s going to tell you more about
the survey. Yeah, yeah so we would like to find out how
we did as hosts. We would like to find out how you benefited
from these lectures. We want to know everything. You can do this by filling out the survey
that will be made available to you in the chat to the side, but before we go we have
some advice that we like to leave you with. Yeah and I believe I will go with my piece
of advice first. I would really stress the importance of being
patient with yourself and trusting your abilities to succeed when you get here. Take a deep breath, trust the process, you
will be fine, and go forward knowing that you’ve started this journey because you were
fully capable of getting to this point and you are able to see it through to the end
with that same enthusiasm that you started with. Yes, so for me, I would say don’t isolate
yourself and don’t be scared of asking for help when you need it. For me, and the last piece of advice, I would
say to keep a positive and enthusiastic attitude, and believe that you can and you will. And with that being said… Welcome home Warriors! Bye!

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