Innovative Ideas on Housing, Transportation and Recreation

Innovative Ideas on Housing, Transportation and Recreation


>>Narrator: We often hear
about problems young people face with disabilities,
but what about when that child emerges
into adulthood? Do these obstacles go away? Adults with disabilities
continue to face physical obstacles,
tackle social rejection, experience medical crises
and face academic pressures. As these obstacles continue
well into their adult years, many have overcome
significant challenges and have achieved success
through traditional and nontraditional outlets. So, what does success
mean to them and just how did
they achieve it? The following success
stories define just how self-determination
opened opportunities for these individuals. Troy Ogden has a passionate
story of determination through adaptive recreation. Let’s hear his story.>>Troy: Hi. My name is Troy Ogden. I live in West Jordan. I’m 27 years old and I’ve
lived in Utah my whole life. Um, my disability — I have Spina Bifida
and also Hydrocephalus. Spina Bifida is where you’re
born with a hole in your spine, and whatever level that hole
is at, is where you err lose, or you’re nerves are damaged. I see myself, um, as I guess as
just a normal person who is able to enjoy life as just as
much as anyone else can. I’m very blessed to
have a wonderful family. So, growing up, um, I played
other — I played sports. I grew up playing
baseball my whole life. And, I kinda um… It was harder for me because
it — I wasn’t a fast runner. So, I would hit the ball, and most of the time
get out at first. It kinda didn’t bug me very
much, but what bugged me most when I got into seventh
grade — seventh — I can’t remember what grade
— somewhere in middle school, I decided to not play baseball
anymore because of that reason, and I regret it every
ever since. I — I feel like I gave up on something I know I
could have done, and so I wish that I’ve — didn’t
give up because I — I did it my whole life. Why couldn’t I do it
another couple of years? I was introduced to
the TRAILS Program. One day, I went out there. They were doing hand cycling
at Liberty Park and I got in. When I got there,
everybody was in wheelchairs and I don’t always
use a wheelchair. I have one, but I use
it for long distances. Once I got on that bike, I rode 6 miles my
first — my first day. And so that was my first
ah-ha moment for — for bike hand cycling. I’ve competed in St.
George Marathon four times. Um, Salt Lake’s Marathon
three times. Blackfoot Marathon two times. Um, the South Jordan
Marathon once. I can’t keep track.>>Narrator: How difficult is
it for your adult child to seek out friends, hobbies
or even find the desire to leave the comfort
of their home? For Troy Ogden it took one
push and he was hooked — hooked on the thrill of downhill
mono Glide Skiing that is. Let’s hear his story.>>Troy: I love adaptive skiing. I went out with the same
program, but they took us up to Wasatch Adaptive,
which is another program. And once I got in that ski… It’s a little different,
the skiing I do now, but, once I got in that– that was
my — my true love, I think — of — of adaptive sports,
if you want to say that. The first ski I tried
out was a bi-ski or biodeek meaning there’s
two skis on the bottom. It’s a sit ski, and there’s
two skis on the bottom, and you have two outriggers
to control yourself. I’ve slowly progressed to,
what’s now, a mono-ski. So it’s a sit ski with just
one — one ski underneath you. These last two years
were the best. It’s because I had my — the
same ski over and over again. And, to me, when I get a
new ski, you get nervous. Just like starting a new thing. You get into a brand new car. It’s different. So, I think the best
thing is to have, for me, is to have the same ski. I did not have a natural talent. I struggled quite a bit and
came home very frustrated with myself a lot of times
and I wasn’t nervous, but, for some reason, when
it was something new– like when they took me to
a steeper mountain — I… My whole body would freeze
up, either forget to turn or forget to breathe [chuckle]. Through Wasatch Adaptive and
Trails, when we go skiing, we have an instructor
or a volunteer who is there to instruct us. To — first of all, to
help you get into the ski, because it’s very,
very tight space and there’s lots of straps. They want to make
sure you’re safe, and that you feel
comfortable in the — the ski. Also, the volunteer is there to
help you get on the ski lift, and also, if you crash —
when you crash– you… At first it’s hard to get up, and so you have someone
there to help you up. They’re — they’re
just there to make sure that you are enjoying your —
your time down the mountain, and also to teach you how to become a better
skier at the same time. I think the biggest
tip for parents is to keep encouraging your — your kids, but don’t push
them too hard into one sport. My ski instructor
says, “If you’re tired, and you’re getting
frustrated, we need to stop, because I don’t want you to get
home angry or upset at yourself. Or you’re so tired you… you… you just keep crashing. You want to go home happy.”>>Narrator: Troy was able to
step outside his comfort zone to find a hobby he is
passionate about and one that he is really good at, while at the same time
building meaningful friendships. This has increased his
sense of self-worth and has encouraged
his independence. Activities, such as group
hobbies or athletics, support socializing and can
also develop needed life skills. For more information on any
of the topics discussed, or to find resources
in your area, please contact the Utah
Parent Center at 801-272-1051. Or our toll free
number is 1-800-468-1160 or visit our website at
www.utahparentcenter.org.

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