How to use a TRIPOD like a PRO with the Benro Aero 7 | Cinecom.net

How to use a TRIPOD like a PRO with the Benro Aero 7 | Cinecom.net


you don’t need fancy stuff like sliders
or jibs to get cinematic shots, just get yourself a tripod if you’re
starting out with filmmaking and you’ll see that by implementing certain
techniques, like composition, lighting, etc. that you can get those
awesome gorgeous shots. we’re using the new Benro Aero 7
tripod, here in this video and it actually comes in two versions,
you have the aluminum one and the carbon-fiber one. This one right here is the carbon fiber
tripod which is super lightweight and that is, of course,
perfect to travel with. Now it also comes with tons of great
features that you also have in those high-end professional tripods, such as,
you know just a few things here. The drag system it has a fluid head so you can kind of change here
the drag of that fluid pan here. Also the same for the tilt, so you can have to put like
a bit more pressure to it to make your pan and tilt movements. That way you can make a lot
more controlled movements. We also have -this is pretty nice- we’ve got
a counterbalance here on the side, so you can use this with light cameras but
also with a little bit stronger cameras. For example, I’m going to put the
counterbalance off for a moment, and now you’ll see that the camera
will just kind of fall forward. So this is not good, we have
to enable that counterbalance and now you’ll see that the camera
will actually pop back, Also not good. It’s a little bit too much, this is
for the more heavier cameras so I’m going to put this at level 2 and now you’ll see that the camera will
actually just stay at its current position, which is awesome. Now, regarding the legs, it also
comes with some nice features, you can actually bend these legs all
the way up, so that’s super versatile. We can also remove this
middle leg, right here, so that way we can go really
low with these legs but we can also keep
that middle leg and that allows as well to go very
high, through that mid bar like this. So a very versatile tripod
that is very promising and I’m going to take this out now, to
travel through the hills and the forest to make some awesome cinematic
shots. So let’s go, guys! You have to pay attention to, when
making still shots in a tripod, is that you look for the architecture or,
in other words, the lines in your shot. For example we’ve got this path
right here, as you can see and this is like there’s one
line in the middle of our shot. Also we’ve got these trees here on the
left side, which kind of breaks that as well. Now, this Benro tripod here has
actually got a very nice feature that kind of comes from those
high-end professional tripods and by that I mean this ball
head right here, and that allows you to kind of
level your tripod, very quickly, like so, so you don’t need to play around
anymore with your legs, like closing them etc. to kind of
look for that right angle to get your camera leveled. Important, as a filmmaker, is that
you can work fast and efficient. So here’s a great tip that
I can give you for that. Take your camera off the tripod before you
are going to look for a correct camera angle. and then just go handheld and look
for that angle that you want to go for. For example right here,
or maybe somewhere else. A low shot, and I do like this a lot. So, this is the correct position
that I wanna go for, I’m going to grab the tripod
now and position it right here. Now this Benro tripod here allows
us to take off the middle leg and kind of fold these
legs upwards, like so and lock them into place, and that way we can go really low to the
ground and still have that nice steady shot and all the benefits of a fluid head. What I love about this shot here,
guys, is that we get that path that goes into the distance, again,
that line in the middle and also we’ve got these trees here that also create these vertical lines again, so, a nice composition and also
love the lighting at the moment. We’ve got the sunlight here
on the right side and that also creates lines over the path. So we’ve got lots of lines here
and nice composition, and I’m going to do a small
tilt movement over this to kind of emphasize how
big these trees are here. And this ball head here again allows us
to work fast to level the camera. There we go, now you can do
this nice tilt movement. Now here’s something pretty cool, guys. We can actually use the leaves
of this tree to play with the Sun. So, as we’re panning or
tilting, through these leaves it will kind of see this flickering
of the Sun into the lens, something definitely pretty cool
that you can do with a tripod. if you’re not getting enough flickering maybe because there is not enough
wind through the leaves, then what you can also do if you
just kind of lean back and forward on your two legs of the tripod, and just like kind of look for that sunlight
to flick through those leaves. Something else that works
great are details in nature. That’s why I’m standing very close to this
tree right here, which has fallen down. And again I’m working with those
lines, like I said in the beginning. We’ve got this tree that is
going into the distance, so I’m kind of doing this small tilt over it and also going to do like
a small focus pull, as well, because we’ve got all of these details. So, let’s do that, guys. I’m going to tilt gently over this and kind of focus pull from the
back, over there, to the front. Today is super hot, not the
ideal day to make this video. It’s like 34° today, and in Fahrenheit that’s even more. In the beginning I was saying that
how versatile this tripod is. And here’s another great feature about
this tripod that I love very much. For example, you can detach
the head of this tripod. Now, this adds tons of possibilities now, you can put this on a slider,
you can put this on a jib, etc. But, and here’s a pretty cool thing. You can also actually detach
one of the legs of this tripod. And this allows you to
transform your tripod… …into… …a monopod! Monopods are super great for working
in tight spaces, in crowded places, and also allows you just to work super
fast, as you are only on a single leg. If you are familiar with our channel you know
that we love to be creative with film gear. And here’s one trick that you
can do with a monopod. You can just flip it upside down, like this, and now the camera is pulling
itself down due to gravity. It kind of works now as a steadycam. Just hold the monopod with two
fingers, very gentle right here, and just start running around. I’m going to run here down the hill
through this very small path, and you’ll see that we kind of get
that steadycam kind of motion. I’m going to put on the
300 mm lens, here, to film the windmills over there
in the distance. Again, a great use of the tripod,
because at 300 mm it’s very hard to get a steady shot. So let’s see how those windmills
look in the distance. That’s pretty gorgeous. It also has this very nice bush
here in the foreground that adds a lot more depth to the shot. And you can try to do
a focus pull, if you want, from that background to the bush, but it’s not always that convenient because
the smallest or the tiniest tremble is noticeable in your shot
when you’re on such a tele lens. And the wind is starting to come up,
that’s good! Because it’s way too hot! Anyways, we’re walking
to a nice open space and we’re going to do some pan and
tilt movements over that space. So we’ve got this very wide open
space here, guys, very beautiful and to show that open space
to the audience I’m going to do this pan
movement over it, as well. Now, very important here is that you
pay attention to the Rule of thirds and that’s actually the raster that you also see
sometimes on your smartphone camera. And what you want to do is put the horizon
on either the upper line of that raster and that will make sure that
the attention goes to the lake if something goes on in there, or you can also put the horizon on the
bottom line of that raster, or the Rule of thirds and that will pull the attention
towards the sky. For example there’s a nice
cloud up in the sky. Currently we’ve got the sunlight over there
which means it functions as a front sliding, so that has benefits such as a
nice blue sky in the background and we can also see those trees there
in the reflection of the water. But if you want to get those
sparkles in the water then you have to make sure that the sunlight
is on the back of this lake, right here. Also, if you wait a little longer for that
golden hour, when the Sun is setting down, then you also have that magic too. so I’m going to do the pan movement
over this lake right now, and I’m going to make sure
that I have my horizon here, on the bottom line of the raster. Because we want to pull attention
to that nice beautiful blue sky, like this. And also put on
the friction again here, like this, we’ll have to pull a bit more
pressure to the pan movement so it can be a lot more
smoother, like this. And later, guys, we’re going
to come back as well to make a shot, the same shot of this, when we have the sunlight on the back
to capture the sparkles in the water and then we are going to put the horizon
on the top line of that raster. What will work fast, guys, than
use the middle leg, right here is to kind of extend that and look for the
correct height that you want to work on. it’s much faster and much more convenient
than fumbling around with the legs to look for your correct height. What I’m doing here is actually a shot with this
rock here, which is very close to the lens and I’m also going to make
sure that this rock here is in focus and the background out of focus. And while I’m going to do like
this very gentle pan over this rock you’ll see that we’re kind of
getting this parallax effect and that just creates enormous depth. I’m also paying a lot of attention to the
lighting which is the sunlight in this case. It shines into the lens and also it creates this nice contrast
over my foreground object, the rock right here, we’re getting
these nice shadows over it. So let’s do a pan movement
over this, guys. we have some nice depth with
the parallax effect and the lighting. Now, if that sunlight here would
have shined from the opposite side, so from the front side, which would
just flat-out light this rock and it wouldn’t have that same
depth that we’re getting right now. Important as well, is that you kind of increase
the drag of your friction here, of the pan so that you have to do
a lot more effort to… …push the camera and therefore
it will be a lot more smoother. Like that, very nice. So that was it, guys,
for this video and I hope you’ve also learned some new
things about using a tripod for traveling. Pay attention to your composition how the
trees look and such, and also the lighting, if the sunlight is coming from the back
usually that creates some nice contrast over your objects. Thank you guys so much for watching, to find out more about this
tripod, the Benro Aero 7, you can find a link to it in the description
below, make sure to visit that. But most importantly… …stay creative!

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