How To Choose A Daypack

How To Choose A Daypack


Hey there my friends, John here, and today
we’re going to be talking daypacks. Now with the wide range of packs that are available
on the market, it can sometimes be a little challenging to find one that’s just right
for you. So today, we’re going to talk really quickly about some of key factors to take
into account when selecting a pack, as well as take a quick look at a few of the different
styles of packs that are available, and wrap that up by looking at some of the main considerations
you’ll want to take into account when selecting a pack that’s ideal for your outdoor adventures.
There are a few important considerations to take into account when selecting a daypack.
Number one would be the primary activity that you intend to use the pack for. Number two
would be the average duration of the trips that you take. Number three would be any personal
preferences, such as capacity, special features, organization abilities, etc. So, what do you
say we take a quick look at a few different styles of packs and how each of those packs
may meet some of those needs. On the smaller end of the spectrum, we have the lumbar pack,
which typically has a capacity of anywhere from 5 to 15 liters. They’re typically just
large enough to fit a few essentials as well as some snacks and water and they excel at
trail running or short hikes in hot weather. Next in line, we have the hybrid hydration
packs which generally run in size from 8 – 15 liters. This is enough room to allow you to
carry plenty of water, as well as a few extra essentials. They excel at trail running, cycling,
or longer duration hikes. Moving up a level, we have the lightweight, no-frills style pack,
which generally has a capacity of around 15-20 liters. These are great for the minimalist
ultralight hiker who prefers to go on long all-day hikes with ultra lightweight loads.
And next we have what you would probably recognize as the most common type of daypack. These
are a mid-size pack that generally comes in at around 20-30 liters in capacity. They can
accomodate all the gear that the average hiker will need for a full day on the trail. And
being the most common type of pack, it’s very easy to find one with all the features that
you require. And coming in at what most would consider to be the upper-most limits of a
daypack is one with a capacity of 30-45 liters. These are ideal for technical activities such
as scrambling, technical climbing, ski touring, etc. They can handle heavier loads and they
can also serve double duty as an overnight pack as well. Once we’ve settled on a specific
style of pack. What are some of the things that we need to look for to make sure that
it’s the best pack for us? Number one would have to be comfort. You want a pack that well-fitting,
it has plenty of padding, adequate ventilation, and plenty of adjustability options. Quality
is extremely important as well. We want a pack that is well made, durable, and is going
to last for many an outdoor adventure. The overall versatility of the pack is extremely
important as well. The more uses and activities that you can pursue with the pack, all the
better. And finally you’ll want to look for a pack that has features that fit your specific
needs and the activities that you like to pursue. This can be anything from trekking
pole loops, multiple attachment points, side mesh pockets, an internal hydration sleeve,
organizational capabilities, pretty much anything that makes your time out on the trail as enjoyable
as possible. Well, I hope you found this information helpful when it comes time to choose your
next daypack, and if so, please feel free to give us a big thumbs up. It let’s us know
you enjoyed the video and we really appreciate it as well. And for more outdoor-related videos,
I’ve included a couple links here that you may enjoy as well. And until next time I just
wanted to say thank you very much for watching and take the best of care.

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