FNAF VR Isn’t A FNAF Game

FNAF VR Isn’t A FNAF Game


Let’s talk about FNAF VR. We’ve gotten a lot of new information on
it in the last couple weeks. Between the teaser coming out, and then being
taken down, and then Scott posting an update about the game, we’ve learned quite a bit! But if you’re not up to speed let me break
down the recent events for you. Last week Scott finally updated his hub of
knowledge, Scottgames.com with a teaser image that had a hidden message and allowed us to
find seven other hidden images on the site. These guys! Of course Scott can never make things easy…SO
MANY HIDDEN IMAGES! Not too shabby for a teaser huh? The community was begging for an update, a
teaser image, something, after 6 months of silence and Scott said “Hold my non-alcoholic
beverage”. Bam! All sorts of new content! So we got all these images that gave us information
on the FNAF VR game, Help Wanted. We learned that the game is going to take
place over multiple locations and we’ll likely play as different characters throughout
the game. We made a whole video on it last week so you
can check that out if you want all the details, but between now and then Scott posted an update
on what he called “The VR Situation”. He goes over the small fan model incident
that happened with the teaser images, but more importantly, he teases a lot of the scenes
we’ll be able to play in the game and gives us some teasers at the end of the update. I’m not going to read the whole thing, it’s
simple enough to find on his reddit page, but let me point out some of the highlights. Scott confirmed we’re going to have sections
where we have to repair Bonnie Chica, and Foxy, and apparently those sections are absolutely
horrifying. I can already feel myself screaming “Why
didn’t I just turn the lights on??” There’s another section that is essentially
a recreation of the Funtime Foxy game in Sister Location. Scott did say people thought that game was
a bit lazy considering it’s just a black screen the entire time, but in VR, it’s
a whole different situation. And I can understand that. There’s a difference between looking at
a black screen while playing a game in your room, and having your entire vision be blacked
out. It’s way more immersive, and way scarier. What might have been one of the worst parts
of any FNAF game could be one of the most intense in VR. Apparently Scott got so scared when he tested
that section that he told Steel Wool, the company creating the game, that he would never
test that section again. Apparently his kid had the same reaction after
testing it. Sounds like some promising stuff. But despite this update from Scott, I have
to say, I remain somewhat skeptical. Not about the horror or whether the game is
going to be good, but about Five Nights At Freddy’s in virtual reality. The more I think about it, the more it doesn’t
fit right in my head. There’s a fundamental issue with FNAF in
VR. Let me explain why. You’ve played a FNAF game right? Probably more than one. Or at the very least you’ve seen other people
play them. Youtubers, friends, your mom, someone. You know the basics of the games. So what are those? What are the core mechanics of every Five
Nights At Freddys game? Well, let’s make a list. I think the first and most obvious mechanic
that really drives home the FNAF franchise has to be jumpscares. It’s the classic horror element of the series. Every FNAF game has them. They’ve certainly improved over the years
as FNAF grew and we should absolutely expect them in Help Wanted. It’s a horror game, jumpscares are par for
the course, nothing surprising there. The second element of every FNAF game is a
time element. Typically we’re playing between midnight
to 6 am and if we make it to 6 then we move on to the next night. This has always been part of FNAF games, it’s
a survival race against the clock, can you hold out for another hour, or is 5am going
to be too much for you? There’s also the time element of each game
taking place over the course of a week. Whatever story the game is trying to tell,
it happens over the course of 5 days..well, not including extra nights, but let’s not
get picky here. Again, this is pretty obvious, it’s literally
in the name. However, FNAF games don’t do their storytelling
during the actual gameplay do they? Another classic element of FNAF games are
the 8bit Minigames. Specifically, 8bit flashback minigames. They weren’t in the original FNAF, but every
game since then has had them as a tool to expand upon the story and give the players
clues as to what is actually going on. They’re vitally important to the plot of
FNAF, most plot analysis starts with these minigames.They can be secret games we have
to find, death games, only show up under certain circumstances, whatever, but they’re a foundational
element of FNAF. There’s also what I would call a “stress
element”. Something that puts tension on the player
as they play in addition to the clock. For example, in FNAF 1 it would managing your
power supply. Your limited power is what makes the game
difficult and causes tension for the player. You have to be smart about what you use and
when. Take chances, learn what uses more power and
what uses less, and figure out animatronic patterns to make it through the night. FNAF 2 had the music box. You had to constantly make sure that thing
was wound or you were assured a speedy death. You had to keep tabs on it while making sure
you get your Freddy mask on before anyone comes into the room. It created suspense during those parts of
the night. Was the music box wound enough? Do you have enough time to get back to it
once Bonnie leaves? It drove a little chaos into the system. FNAF 3 had the resetting function that took
precious time where you were left helpless. Your audio device, camera system, and ventilation
could all short out on you and various illusions would force them to break. You’d have to spend precious seconds resetting
them while not knowing if Springtrap was waiting just behind your screen. It was terrifying. These examples should give you a good idea
of what I’m talking about. In each game there’s some element that puts
stress on the player, something that you have to do or manage or you’ll die. The last element of every fnaf game is that
the player is essentially in an immobile or limited movement state. Our character is always stationary and our
head movement is typically limited to 2 or 3 statuses. Straight on, left, or right. That’s typically it. This is possibly the most essential element
to a fnaf game because it creates the an unknown variable. We can’t watch everything at once. We can’t do a task while watching the door. The game doesn’t allow it. And that creates fear and suspense for when
we turn back. Are we safe? Or am I about to die? It’s a classic use of the fear of the unknown
and every FNAF game relies heavily on us not knowing what’s behind the next camera, or
in the darkness, or behind our screen at any given time. It’s a vital and fundamental mechanic of
fnaf games. And I think it’s a massive issue we’re
going to see in VR. If you’ve played VR games, you know that
one of the core principles of VR is freedom. You can move, and more importantly, look,
anywhere at any time. It’s what makes VR so immersive. You’re controlling your line of sight with
your head, and you can look up, down, all around, wherever, at any time. That idea doesn’t connect with the core
concepts of FNAF games. FNAF is all about restricting your movement
to add to the horror experience. It’s about creating an unknown for you to
fear. It makes a unique type of suspense and terror
that I don’t find from many other horror games. While jumpscares are pretty common in the
horror genre, the act of creating suspense through limited movement is something I only
associate with FNAF. If FNAF VR is based around the same essential
concepts as the rest of the games, then we should expect a stationary character, or a
very limited movement character that can only look in certain directions, and those directions
create fear when turning back. Something is going to have to be sacrificed
in Help Wanted. Either we’re going to see a change to the
fnaf formula, or we aren’t going to be playing a game that feels like a FNAF game. And that’s what I mean when I say FNAF VR
isn’t a Five Nights At Freddy’s Game. Despite having the horror, the characters,
and hopefully the story behind it, this game will feel different, it won’t feel the same
as playing any of the others. Now I’m not saying that’s a bad thing. On the contrary, some of the best sequels
to gaming have broken the formula of their predecessors. Breath of the Wild is an excellent example. Zelda had become such a formulaic franchise
you knew exactly what to do in any dungeon. You find a new weapon and use that weapon
to kill the boss, typically hitting a glowy eye or some other glowy spot. Then you hit them with your sword. Breath of the Wild gave us a ton of mini dungeons,
and open world, and weapons with durability. They broke the formula, and the game came
out amazing! That could happen here too, in fact, I’m
hopeful it will. Based on what Scott said, he’s extremely
optimistic with regards to how the game is coming along. Help Wanted sounds immersive, terrifying,
and realistic. With a new medium to release games in, it
makes sense for Help Wanted to break the fnaf formula and strive for something new that
uses VR to its utmost potential. However, I hope Steel Wool keeps parts of
the FNAF formula in there. It worries me that they may not. We should expect jumpscares, time elements,
and a pressure or stress element. I’d absolutely love to see 8 bit minigames
in 3D. I think there’s huge potential to expand
upon the story in Help Wanted, and I don’t want to see the classic story telling element
dropped because of the medium the game was made in (though I don’t expect it to be). Keeping what works and changing out the movement
limitations to meet VR’s strengths is the best way to expand the FNAF universe to a
new platform. But it won’t feel the same as other FNAF
games, it’s going to be different. The question is, how different? How important is limited movement and sight
to making a game feel like FNAF? That’s a question we just can’t answer
until Help Wanted is released, but we should expect change, a new feel, and hopefully something
that feels like fnaf, but even more immersive, instead of a completely different feel to
the game altogether. But we just don’t know yet, so all we can
do it hope and wait. But that’s not the only thing that scares
me. I’m terrified of robots finding where I
live and coming to stuff me into a bunny suit! You never know when animatronics might trace
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I’ll see you all in the next one. Bye!

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