Deuter AVIANT Carry On Pro 36 Review | Men’s & Women’s Fit Travel Backpack

Deuter AVIANT Carry On Pro 36 Review | Men’s & Women’s Fit Travel Backpack


– The Deuter AVIANT Carry On Pro 36 is a 36 liter backpack
with a lot of organization and a men’s and women’s fit as well. I’m Tom, the founder of Pack Hacker, where we use our expertise
and real-world experience to provide practical
resources and honest opinions guiding you towards smarter travel. So if you’re new to the
channel consider subscribing. Let’s jump right into the
Deuter AVIANT Carry On Pro 36, a bag that I’ve personally been testing the men’s version here for
the last week in Detroit, and Taylor, our writer and contributor, has been using it for a
two-week trip to Europe. So let’s dive in and
check out all the details. And one last thing before we do, feel free to head over to packhacker.com, take a look at the full review with photos as well as the best buying
options for this bag. Let’s jump into the review. (funky jazz beat) Kicking it off with the
overall look and feel of the Deuter 36 liter
AVIANT Carry On Pro, it’s got a nice travel
bag aesthetic to it. Something that matches, something similar to the popular Osprey Farpoint 40. So it definitely has that look and feel across the board. At the time of this review the bag comes in a couple
of different color ways from the men’s and the women’s version. The men’s version comes
in black, midnight navy, and khaki ivy, which is the
color way that we have here. The women’s version comes
in three color ways as well. We have the maroon aubergine,
black, and denim arctic. The women’s version comes
with this removable flower on the side to indicate
that it’s a women’s version, it feels a little bit heavy handed to us and Taylor took it off
immediately when she got the bag. From a branding perspective
we have a Deuter logo at the front of the bag up here, and then flipping it around to the back, we have it on the straps, above the foam padding of the back panel, and then on these zipper pulls as well. We also have the name of the bag here, the AVIANT Carry On Pro 36. That’s a decent amount of type and logos on the outside of this bag, but that’s typically what you get for a travel backpack with this aesthetic. We polled our Instagram
audience to get their thoughts on the look of this bag
and here are the results. Make sure to go follow
@packhacker on Instagram if you wanna be involved in future polls. The main fabric on the
exterior of this bag is a Polyamide and Polyester blend. This is a decent fabric
for a travel backpack, again, a similar feel to
the Osprey Farpoint 40. It is nice and soft to the touch and has some decent
durability qualities as well. Another thing to note here
is that there is foam padding used on some of the areas
of the exterior of this bag that helps it hold its
shape even while it’s empty. And we like that, it keeps
the bag looking slick. Some other thinner bags can start to look a little bit wonky and
sort of lose their shape as you start filling it up
with gear of different sizes. But at the same time,
it’s not overkill on foam so there’s just enough
to help keep the shape but not too much to make
it bulky or unwieldy. Wrapping up with some other
key materials in the bag, we have some durable YKK
zippers used throughout. And then we have some YKK buckles and plastic hardware on some of the adjustment areas as well. Starting with the harness system, this time this one is pretty comfortable so let’s dive in and see why. Starting with the straps there
is a decent amount of padding which makes it very comfortable to carry. The way that the harness
system is anchored it’s a little bit lower so you have this weight at the top behind your back, and that can help the bag feel
a little bit more balanced while you’re carrying it. Moving on down, we have
the sternum strap here covered by a little flap of welted fabric, and that hides this PALS-like webbing here where you could attach and
detach the sternum strap. We like way this sternum
strap is attached, it is a semi-permanent fit. We have lost a decent
amount of sternum straps on other bags that don’t have this permanent of an attachment. This strap adjusters at the
bottom here are pretty nice and glide pretty easily as well. The foam back panel
provides some nice airflow to avoid that sweaty back, and although with any bag
you’re pretty much gonna get a sweaty back depending on
the climate that you’re in, this one does pretty
great job with airflow. Behind this there is a
luggage pass through as well, so if you’re using this
bag with a roller luggage you can just stick it on the top and wheel it around through the airport. Taylor and I found that the harness system was pretty comfortable
for both men and women, but there are a couple of drawbacks. The entire harness system can unbuckle and stow behind the back
panel which is great, however, we have found that these straps can undone without warning. Between Taylor and I and
our testing for three weeks, it has happened a total of three times. This seems to happen when
the bag is jostled around and those buckles are bumped on the sides. This isn’t great if you’re
throwing on the bag quickly and trying to sprint through the airport to catch a flight, that’s
basically the last time that you’d want these straps to disengage. We wish that they would’ve
considered designing this in a little bit of a different way in order to mitigate that problem. And lastly, there is no
hip belt option on this bag at all and that’s basically
gonna be up to you whether that matters or not. At 36 liters we think
it’s nice to at least give people the option, really
anything above 30 liters and we think at least an
option for a hip belt is nice. The rest of this bag is pretty minimal and we like it that way. There are no water bottle
pockets on the sides, no extra doodads or rows
of PALS webbing going on, we just have a nice handle at the top here which is the right amount of padding, and then one on the side as well. Plus we like the sewing
on the attachment point, especially that it’s a little bit angled. So this strap isn’t exactly
centered in the bag, but that angle helps offset
the weight a little bit of the bag and helps it carry
it straight up and down. Moving onto the inside of the pack starting with the front pocket, this basically opens up
to a giant compartment. This pocket is enclosed with a number five YKK racquet coil zipper,
which is the standard for bags and luggage
in the travel category. Next up, let’s take a look at the big tech organization pocket
in the back of the bag. This uses a number eight YKK zipper and opens up like this. There’s a ton of
organization going on here, so let’s run right through it. Near the wearer’s back we
have a laptop compartment that should fit a 15 inch laptop nicely. It definitely fits my MacBook Pro, might even fit laptops of
a little bit larger size. This closes with a small Velcro strap which is a little bit hard to fasten and seems a bit misaligned in our version. The nice thing about this
laptop compartment is that it is centered inside of the bag which will help protect
it from unexpected drops. Plus, it’s got some padding as well. In front of that we have two pockets. A stretchy mesh pocket that’s good for a notebook or a tablet, and then a zippered
pocket on the side of that that opens up, basically a giant pocket with a keyring inside as well. Opposite of this organization
we have two mesh pockets that are stretchy, similar to the first but a little bit smaller. And then we have a liner divider pocket that is good for flatter
items or documents. We think the organization is great, but a little bit overkill. This pocket has a lot
of volume which means that it takes away from
the space used for clothes, sure you can use this pocket
for clothing if you’d like, and everything lays pretty flat if you don’t wanna utilize it. But, if you have more
clothing than you do tech, it’s a little bit large. Moving onto the main
compartment of this bag, it opens up fully clam-shell style. Towards the wearer’s back we
have a zippered liner pocket that takes up about
half of the bag in size. The zipper pocket also
features some gusseting which will allow you to hold gear that’s a little bit larger if you need to. It’s important to note that
the gusset is on the side that goes into the clothing pocket, and won’t really affect the main volume of the tech organization compartment that we just covered. Opposite of that we have
a big zippered mesh pocket that does a good job at
securing packing cubes and clothing inside of
the main compartment. Inside of the main compartment we have two compression straps that are great for holding clothing in
place and packing cubes. Towards the bottom there is
removable shoe compartment that we really dig, it is
held in place by four toggles so it stays securely in
place when you want it and then easily removes when you don’t. As mentioned earlier, Taylor
and I have been using this bag for a total of three weeks
between Europe and Detroit. In actual use we found the tech pocket to be a little bit larger
and a little bit overdone. On Taylor’s trip she
ended up using this space for her laptop but also
just more clothing, she didn’t need to utilize every single little pocket going on here. One other note here is that
a lot of the organization inside of this bag is sideways. It’s important to note this
and be conscience of how you’re carrying the bag and
how you’re setting it down. So if you have a lot of your items perfectly organized inside
they may get jostled around and disorganized inside of the
main compartment of this pack, especially since a lot of the
pockets don’t have zippers. Luckily the handle’s on the correct side and when you’re carrying
it in briefcase mode the items will be right-side up. Lastly, Taylor loved using
the front stash pocket for a lot of snacks. She’s vegan so she can’t eat
a ton while she’s on the road, it was nice for her to have
this massive compartment just basically filled with
vegan snacks on the road. So to wrap this thing up
with some pros and cons, starting with the pros, there was a comfortable carry in the men’s and women’s versions. The removable shoe
compartment is a nice touch and we think it’s a great
feature to include in this bag. There’s some great airflow
with the mesh back panel as you’re carrying the bag around. Onto some of the cons, the straps can detach without warning. The tech organization pocket
is a little bit large, overkill in our opinion. Lastly, there is no option for a hip belt. We think bags of 30 liters
and up should at least have an option to attach a hip belt. At the end of the day, the
Deuter AVIANT Carry On Pro 36 is a solid backpack for
travel at a great price. It’s got that travel backpack vibe and the features and
organization to go along with it. Sometimes you may run into the
strap disengaging randomly, but if you’re okay with that this bag is a solid
choice for one bag travel. So there you have it, our review of the Deuter Carry On Pro 36. We would love to hear what
you think of this thing in the comments below, so
please be sure to let us know. Thanks for keeping it here at Pack Hacker, your guide to smarter travel, we’ll see you in the next video.

23 thoughts on “Deuter AVIANT Carry On Pro 36 Review | Men’s & Women’s Fit Travel Backpack”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *