CHS – Creating Accessible Recreation Facilities (Short Version)

CHS – Creating Accessible Recreation Facilities (Short Version)


♫ uplifting music ♫ Announcer VO: In communities
across Ontario, local recreation centres
are often the central point, or hub, of the community, providing access
to physical activities, to promote healthy lifestyles,
and active community engagement. But for those who are Deaf
or hard of hearing, facilities without access
can create barriers, leaving them feeling unwelcomed, and separated
from the community. Ambient noise in arenas, pools, fitness classes,
and other venues, often makes it very difficult
to understand verbal instruction. Sometimes, staff don’t know
how to communicate properly, leaving those who are
Deaf or hard of hearing feeling frustrated and isolated. In order for everyone
in your community to actively participate, it’s important to understand
the challenges visitors who are Deaf
or hard of hearing face, and learn how to communicate
with them more effectively. The Ontario Recreation
Facilities Association and the Canadian Hearing Society have teamed up to present
some real-life scenarios so you can better understand the challenges and barriers
that need to change. You’ll see how easy it is to provide
full access in your centre, making it safe and accessible for everyone in the community
to enjoy. Interpreter VO: Hi,
my name is Peter. I was born deaf because when my mom
was six months pregnant with me, she had shingles. When I come upon barriers,
I feel very frustrated, because a lot of people
don’t have experience with communicating
with Deaf people. I have to teach them
how to communicate, and how to talk with me. It’s almost like they freeze, as if they were a deer in the headlights. Woman (muffled): Hi, good morning,
how can I help you today? Sorry, how can I help you today? Oh, um, not really understanding… (clearly) Sorry, is this your dad? Kid: Um, yeah.
He’s deaf. Woman: Oh, okay,
so how can I help you today? Kid: Uh, he wants to sign me up
for the power skating course. Woman: Okay, yeah sure. It’s just… right here, (muffled) it costs
this amount of money, and can you let your dad know that on the fourteenth
is the introductory meeting. So, did you want to sign up
for the second level as well? And how are you gonna
pay for that today? Do you want to pay cash,
or credit? Is there anything else
I can help you guys with? Kid (muffled): No,
I think that’s it. Interpreter VO: When people
can communicate with me and everyone knows sign language,
or there’s accessibility, I have no frustration. I feel at peace,
and I feel a sense of equality. Woman: Hi, good morning,
how can I help you today? Oh… okay, we have
a new communication device, would you like to use that? Okay. ♫ uplifting music ♫ Interpreter VO: My advice
would be quite simple: make an effort.
Use gestures, have a pen and paper
ready for communication, and be willing to use
other approaches to communicate, maybe go and take
a sign language course. Once you start learning
sign language, people will pick it up
quite easily. And when they meet
a Deaf person, they won’t think,
“Oh no, it’s a Deaf person!” They’ll be able to see them
for who they really are. Jennifer: My name is Jennifer, and my son Harry
was born hard of hearing, which we found out when he was — I guess three months old. We’ve had some barriers,
especially around swimming class, because he talks really well, so people forget
that he can’t hear them if he doesn’t
have his hearing aids in. People expect him
to be able to lipread, but you really cannot lipread
an entire swimming class. It just doesn’t work. Jennifer: Oh, excuse me!
Instructor: Hi there! Jennifer: This is my son Harry.
Harry’s hard of hearing – Instructor: Oh, I’m sure we’ll be
fine in the water, he’ll be okay. Okay, come on guys,
let’s go in the pool. Jennifer: But — wait — Instructor (muffled):
All right guys, are we ready to start
a new lesson today? Kids (muffled): Yeah! Instructor (muffled):
Can everybody show me how we put our face in
and blow bubbles? Show me — put your face in
and blow bubbles. Awesome, perfect!
Okay, thank you! Do you guys want to do
your front floats now? Kids (muffled): Yeah! Instructor (muffled): Let’s try it!
Okay — you go first — arms out, legs out, face in.
Whoa, awesome! Jennifer: When we go somewhere and people understand Harry’s needs
and take them into account? It makes such a huge difference. I feel like I can breathe
a sigh of relief. I’m not going to be
worrying all the time — does he understand, is he reaching his potential,
is he having fun? When — when people accommodate
his hearing issues? It just makes me feel
so much better. Jennifer: Oh, excuse me!
Instructor: Hi there! Jennifer: This is my son Harry,
Harry’s hard of hearing, so when he has his
hearing aids in, he can lipread, but he can’t wear them
in the pool. Instructor: Okay,
that’s totally fine. You know, I think I have some
great ways to communicate with him, and we should be okay. Instructor: All right, you ready
to go swimming? Let’s go. Instructor (muffled): All right, hi everybody, how’re we doing today, good? Kids (muffled): Yeah! Instructor (muffled): Okay, so,
first thing we’re gonna do today, is we’re gonna try swimming
on our back. Okay, everybody see that?
Good. And the second thing we’re gonna do, is we’re gonna try kicking our feet. Can everyone show me
how you kick your feet? (splashes) Okay, kick your feet,
good job. (splashes) Good! Okay, stop! All right. Let’s get in the pool! Jennifer (clearly): Having
full access is huge. Imagine if — imagine if you
were taking a class, and you didn’t know
until you got there that everyone was going
to be speaking a language you didn’t understand. And you were expected
to somehow just follow along. It wouldn’t work! Being able to understand
what’s going on, and really participate? Really be included? Is huge. Diane: My name is Diane, and I was born with
a sensorineural hearing loss, which is a nerve hearing loss, most likely due to my mother
being exposed to the rubella virus when she was pregnant with me. When I walk into a facility
that’s not accessible, I feel very unwelcome. I feel disappointed, because I don’t feel
that this facility is for me, and it doesn’t give me a sense
of being at par with everyone else. Diane: Hello. Woman (softly): Hi,
how can I help you today? Diane: I’m here to find out
if the tennis courts are open? Woman: Yeah, sure, just one sec. (muffled) Annette, do you know
where we put those schedules? Annette (muffled):
They’re right over there. Woman (muffled): Oh, perfect. Diane (clearly): Pardon me? Woman (muffled): I’m just
grabbing you a schedule. Diane (clearly): Pardon? Woman (muffled): Were you thinking
you wanted to play tennis today? Diane: I’m sorry, I can’t understand you
with your back turned. Woman (clearly, annoyed): I said,
did you want to play tennis today? Diane: When there’s full access,
and I can communicate freely, and I can understand what’s being said, that means I can participate fully
in whatever I’m engaged in, it makes me feel worthy
as a person. Diane: Hello. Woman (softly): Hi,
how can I help you today? Diane: I’m here to find out
if the tennis courts are open? Woman: Yeah sure, just a sec. (inaudible) Diane: Excuse me, I’m sorry, I can’t understand you,
I’m hard of hearing? Woman (muffled): Do you happen
to wear a hearing aid? Diane: Yes, I do. Woman (muffled): We have this new counterloop,
would you like to give it a try? Diane: Sure! Woman (muffled): You just have to
switch your hearing aid to “T.” (clearly) How’s that.
Can you hear me better? Diane: Much better. Woman: I just need you
to turn your hearing aid to “T.” Can you hear me better now? Diane Much better!
Woman: Oh perfect! Woman: This is for you… Diane: That would be great! Diane: There is a huge market for individuals
who have hearing loss – whether they’re deaf,
or have hearing loss — from children to seniors,
this is a group that should be included
in the recreation facility. It can help them participate,
engage with other people, but it also helps them
lead healthier lives. And that’s really
what’s very important. Interpreter VO:
My name is Alessandro. I was born deaf. Growing up,
I was crazy about hockey, but I’ve experienced
some barriers. Oftentimes,
when coaches would be speaking, I would miss out
on a lot of information. It was tough to lipread, if they had a moustache, goatee,
or a beard of some sort. When announcements were made,
it was all auditory, so I would follow players
into the changeroom to understand what was going on. I always found a way,
but I always felt left out. (skates swish across the ice) (whistle blows)
Referee: Red, roughing! Coach: Ref, time out, come on!
Referee: Time out. Blue. Coach: C’mon guys! Coach: Okay,
we gotta set this up, (muffled) because we haven’t been
that strong on the power play. Our draws have been
pulling to the left. Off the draws, I want to set up
strong on the right side. That’s what you guys do.
I want you to find the space. (muffled) Strong in the points, and we draw our men
to where the spaces are, we find the space, we make our
passes, we’re gonna be okay. Everybody Understand?
Good. Go to it! (skates swishing) Interpreter VO: It would be nice if rec centres could provide screens
with captioning for announcements. And it’s good for people
that hear, as well — not just people who are
Deaf or hard of hearing. Hire interpreters
when kids start sports, so they can understand,
and feel included. Coach: Time out! Time out! Come in! ♫ uplifting rock music ♫ (muffled) Okay, we gotta take
advantage of this power play. I want the goalie
to be aggressive, I want you to play that puck. If we find space, if we do our job
and we play our position, and we get the open ice,
there’s gonna be plays, okay? Good? Okay, we’re good? Let’s go! Interpreter VO: For Deaf
and hard of hearing kids, I would hope to see that they are
happy and not being left out, and that they have full access
to information. With more access for kids, parents would have less headaches,
less stress, and less worry, knowing that their children
who are involved in sports have full access to information. Interpreter VO: My name is Pat.
I was born hearing, and then at the age of two,
I became deaf. When I go into a public place
without access, I feel very frustrated. I feel like I need support to identify
what’s happening around me. (alarm bell rings) (quiet) Pat: If technology is set up properly, and it’s very visual —
visual lighting, visual fire alarms — it will help a lot. ♫ uplifting music ♫ (alarm bell rings) (ringing continues) Interpreter VO: When I go into a place
that has full access, it feels wonderful. It feels like I have
full accommodation and equality to access,
which is very important. (whistle blows) Lifeguard (muffled shouting):
Everybody get out of the pool! Hey! Hey, you have to
get out of the pool! Stop!
Did you not hear the whistle? You have to get out of the pool! (kids splashing and shrieking) (splashing) Announcer VO: To remove barriers
and meet the needs of visitors who are Deaf
or hard of hearing, not only do you
and your coworkers need to understand
their communication needs, but you also need to implement modifications to
the physical space, so they can participate safely, and enjoy full access
to all activities. ♫ uplifting music ♫ There are many types of
communication and alerting devices that can help break down
communication barriers in the built environment. Technology exists to make
communication easy and fast. Accessibility is not a destination
but an evolution, and something
your recreation centre can start thinking about
and acting upon today. It’s not difficult to build
an inclusive environment to provide full access to all
individuals in your community, allowing them to actively engage and participate
like everyone else. After all, recreation centres
are built to engage residents in active,
healthy lifestyles, and promote community engagement
for everyone who lives there. And everyone
should mean everyone. For more information
on how you can provide full access in your recreation centre, contact CHS
or visit us online at chs.ca. Thanks for watching. ♫ uplifting music ♫

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