AMC Trail Crew Airlift 2009 Video

AMC Trail Crew Airlift 2009 Video


[music] OK folks – folks, excuse me – we have to mobilize
here. He’s actually leaving right now because the weather’s good down there, so he’s heading
out and first stop is going to be Aaron and Sally over at The Flume and then we’re all
going to meet over at Peabody. We have our crew out here. We’ve got a number
of folks with the AMC Trails Department and again, all trained in helicopter safety. This
is one of our kick-offs to our year, doing this yearly airlift. It’s a pretty exciting
time. You’ll see a lot of folks smiles on their faces. All this wood here is for a project – a bog
bridge project out at Lonesome Lake. We were donated the money to do this project…..
we’ll be using this material to put a series of bog bridges along the northern end of the
lake. So when we replace a bridge…. we are able to divert hikers around the lake, which
now the trail’s in pretty poor condition. And later this fall we’ll be sending up the
materials to construct the bridge over the outlet of Lonesome Lake, which is the beginning
of the Cascade Brook. Pretty soon we’ll be utilizing the services
of JBI Helicopter Services out of Pembroke, New Hampshire. So along with flying bog bridge materials,
we also fly in hardwood bark to the backcountry campsites that AMC manages, and we use them
for our composting outhouses. They’re in 50-pound bags – the white feed bags you saw earlier
in the video – and the helicopter can carry 800 pounds, so it’s approximately 16 bags
per load, depending on how wet the bark is, actually. We try and fly it in as dry as we
can. And we have 14 locations we fly it to, so it takes a fair amount of logistics to
figure out the different stage points throughout the Whites that we airlift it from. But it helps us a lot and some sites will
get either one load of 16 or two, and then our more popular sites get up to three per
year, so like 48 bags that we use for mixing with human waste in the composting systems. So the scenario would be, we’ll have four
top crew out of the Austin Brook stage, two first load – all four would get in, two would
go to the summit of Mount Success. So most of these bog bridges that are getting
flown to Lonesome Lake and to the Mahoosucs will be installed this summer by teen volunteer
crews based out of Camp Dodge here in the White Mountains. It’s pretty exciting that these teenagers
that will be installing these bog bridges get to see this footage of what it takes to
get the bog bridge material up to these remote locations before they start to install these
bog bridges in really wet areas and sections of trail. [music]

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