Accessible Adventures: Heather Meadows in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

Accessible Adventures: Heather Meadows in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest


Hi I’m John Williams, Welcome to another Accessible
Adventure in The Pacific Northwest. You know when I tour the Northwest, I find it pretty difficult to decide on a “most spectacular place” but Heather Meadows has to be at the top of my list! This time, I’ll show you some spots to enjoy this very special place in the Mt Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Heather Meadows is about a 60 mile drive from Bellingham, on Highway 542, The Mt. Baker Scenic Byway, but I recommend you devote an entire
day or more to this sensory overload! There’s plenty to do and see along the way. A stop at the National Forest & National Park Public Service Center at Glacier will be helpful. Built by the CCC in the 1930’s, here visitors can plan for their outing, purchase maps, books and federal recreation passes. Then
stroll around the grounds, check out the interpretive signs and use the facilities. While you’re here, have a picnic on the back lawn behind the Glacier Public Service Center. If you need to stretch, you may want to check out this hike located a mile east of the Glacier Public Service Center, it’s The Boyd Creek
Interpretive Trail on FS Road 37. This short nature trail on hard packed earth, and boardwalk, it focuses on healthy fish habitat. Or, pull off at the Doulglas Fir Campground stroll through the fern grottos and the ancient evergreens, on this trail next to the Nooksack River. On our way to Heather Meadows,
we stop by Mt. Baker Ski Area. In the winter time this is one of the premier ski areas in the United States, but we’ll come back in the winter for another accessible adventure. Let’s get back on the road to Heather Meadows. Because of the one way road, just before Heather Meadows, I want to show you one of the more beautiful places to stop. This is Picture Lake, and it
may seem almost trite to say, but it is a place you’ll want to take lots of Pictures! That is Mt. Shuksan, which has been watching over this spot for millions of years! Follow me along this paved trail, and thanks to boardwalks crossing the wet areas, it circles the lake, and it’s accessible all the way ’round. What started out to be a ski warming hut,
built by the CCC in 1940, is the center of this spectacular place. Heather Meadows Visitor Center, open from mid July through late September, US Forest Service personnel are on hand to answer your questions. There are books, maps and other items, including recreation passes on sale through the Discover Your Northwest Interpretive Association sales outlet. There are many trails, of various degrees
of difficulty, for hiking. Several of the trails I found accessible. This is the Fire and Ice Trail. It’s a little steep in places, but wheelchair friendly. Get a close up view from this view point. Ok, we’re on our way to the most picturesque place. Yea I’ve saved it for last. This is Artist Point, looking out again at Mt. Shuksan and Mt. Baker just beyond for one of the most photographed
scenes in North America. In the summer time, the flowers are on fire
with beautiful colors! End your visit to Heather Meadows with a relaxing picnic at the Austin Trail Picnic Area. You’ll find picnic tables that are accessible right up these packed gravel pathways. The Window of opportunity here
at Heather Meadows is rather short. The snow usually clears by mid July, but returns in October and The Mt. Baker Scenic Byway, it’s only 60 miles long, but this is a day you’ll remember for a long, long time. Be sure to see all of our Accessible Adventures in The Pacific Northwest right here and I’ll see you soon for our next Accessible Adventure in the Pacific Northwest. Cut! …. Look at this beauty. Makes me want to yodel. Yodel la he who…Yodel la he who…Yodel la he who…Yodel la he who…Yodel la he who…(laughing)

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