A Train Lost in a Tunnel in Italy, No One Can Find It

A Train Lost in a Tunnel in Italy, No One Can Find It


“Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats.
The train leaves in a few minutes. All the seers-off, please exit the car. You may wave
to your loved ones from the platform. We hope you’ll enjoy your trip. Drinks and
snacks will be served soon. Get ready to travel through time; our next stop is a medieval
monastery in Modena!” Imagine traveling on a train that is actually
a time machine that would never bring you back. The 106 passengers and crew of the Zanetti
train probably would’ve thought twice before they embarked on their adventure, had they
known that. Just like the passengers of the “Titanic,” which set off for its first
and last cruise almost a year later, they never reached their destination. The difference,
though, is that no one knows what happened to the train… On July 14, 1911 the rail company “Zanetti”
offered well-off Italians a free trial ride on their new train. The passengers were enjoying
their ride watching scenic views along the way, making small talk, and enjoying their
refreshments. One of the sites they were looking forward to was a new tunnel that went through
a mountain. It was one of the longest ever built at the time. And that’s where the mystery begins. The
train entered the half mile-long (1 km) tunnel in Lombardy Mountain and never came out! Just,
disappeared! After the incident, the railway workers and police searched every square foot
of it, but found no trace of the train. The tunnel itself was just a long tube. There
was nowhere to go but to the other side, yet there was neither a train nor any signs of
a crash there. However, there were two passengers found who’d
jumped off the train just before it vanished into the tunnel. Later, when they came to,
they were able to tell the story of their eerie trip. As the train approached the tunnel, black
smoke came out of nowhere as well as a dense white fog. The train slowed down as it was
nearing the entrance, and the fog began to envelop it. The men panicked and jumped to
the ground before the train was gone. One of the survivors told an Italian newspaper
about the incident: “I heard an unclear humming sound. Beyond the black smoke, I could
see a milky-white fog creeping from the tunnel – it literally swallowed the train like
a wave. And with it the first car of our ill-fated train split open. It became so horrifying.
The train was barely moving so I jumped from the car and my eyes caught another passenger
who jumped at the same time. We both hit the ground hard, and that is the last thing I
remember.” The injured men suffered from sleeping troubles
and other stress disorders for a while. As for the train, it was never seen again. Word
spread about the tunnel, and officials thought it best to close it. Then, the notorious tunnel
happened to get bombed during World War II, closing it off forever… No one could come up with a sound explanation
for this strange disappearance: dozens had witnessed the train leaving the station in
Rome and entering the tunnel, but nobody saw it come out. But that’s not the last time we’d hear
about the mysterious train. There are records of medieval monks from Modena who saw a three-car
train with people in it. How could they conceive a huge iron machine puffing clouds of black
smoke? A horse was the fastest means of transport at the time. Railroads hadn’t been invented
yet. Well, they thought it, along with the passengers who they described were clean-shaven
and dressed in black, all must be the work of some evil forces… You can say that medieval monks made it up,
but here’s the thing: their report was kept in the records of Casta Solea, stored by the
Sadjino family. And one of the survivors of the train had the name Sadjino. Then, in the 1840s, there’s a report that
the Zanetti passengers were seen in Mexico. A psychiatrist in a local hospital left notes
saying that a group of 104 Italians were admitted all in a hysterical state. They were all dressed
in strange clothes obviously from a different place, and claimed they were travelling from
Rome by a Zanetti train. One of the passengers actually had a cigarette box with a future
date “1907”on it. They say it is still kept in a Mexican museum. The psychiatrist concluded that it was a case
of mass insanity, but he failed to come up with any explanation for it. There are no
records left of the patients after that. Many years later, the train appeared again
in Europe. On October 29, 1955 a three-car old-fashioned train appeared not far from
Zavalichi, a small village in Ukraine. The signalman, Pyotr Ustimenko, saw it moving
soundlessly. He reported that he’d been on duty that
night and suddenly saw a train that wasn’t on the schedule. The train was heading without
tracks to Gasfort Mountain. He thought he was seeing things and rubbed his eyes, but
there it was – with shut curtains, open doors, and an empty driver’s cabin. Ustimenko
had never seen a train like that before, but he knew it was old, definitely a pre-war model.
The description he gave was the same as that of the Zanetti. It’s unlikely a signalman
from a remote town in the USSR would know anything about an Italian train lost at the
beginning of the 20th century. Another interesting note about this sighting
is that at the end of the 19th century, there was an Italian cemetery built on Gasfort Mountain
near Sevastopol. About 2,000 Italian soldiers who died during the Crimean War were buried
there. Later, a railroad from Balaklava was constructed over the former cemetery, but
then was destroyed after the revolution of 1917 because it was no longer used. Was the
ghost train riding on ghost tracks to meet its Italian brethren? I guess we’ll never
know… And, again, this wasn’t the last account
of the train appearing. As crazy as all this sounds, could there be
a scientific explanation of the ghost train adventures? Some believe all the railroads in the world
form a sort of connected web that has its own magnetic field. The trains serve as electric
conductors between the earth’s natural magnetic field and the artificial one. The conflict
between the two forces creates fractures in time with endless holes. This explanation
is based on Einstein’s theory of relativity and Minkowski’s definition of distance. These fractures are called “chronal holes.”
Sometime before the Zanetti train left the station, there had been an earthquake where
the tracks were. It’s believed the crust fracture, which appeared under Lombardy Mountain,
created a time anomaly at the entrance to the tunnel. The train became the link necessary
to dig through time and space, and it fell from its time vector where it belonged and
could move to other times. So, in layman’s terms, it was traveling through time! In case you’re already getting goosebumps
and swearing off trains forever, rest assured that this isn’t something you have to worry
about happening to you because it’s just an urban legend. It got so popular that some
paranormal enthusiasts devoted years to finding proof of the Zanetti train’s existence.
As time went on, more names and details were added to the legend. However, if you try to
look-up the rail company Zanetti, Casta Solea, the Sadjino family, or a signalman named Pyotr
Ustimenko, you’ll only find links to different versions of this legend. Ghosts and trains make for great stories,
but there has yet to be any evidence of a ghost train ever existing. But I don’t think
that’ll stop people from looking for them or telling more stories about them!
If you have the time, you can find dozens of stories about ghost trains to keep you
entertained. One of the most popular stories is a play written by Arnold Ridley in 1923,
“The Ghost Train,” that was inspired by a creepy night he spent at a remote railway
station. Hmm, sounds like a pretty good read! Do you know any other urban legends? Let me
know down in the comments! If you learned something new today, then give this video
a like and share it with a friend. But – hey! – don’t go anywhere just
yet! We have over 2,000 cool videos for you to check out. All you have to do is pick the
left or right video, click on it, and have fun! Stay on the Bright Side of life!

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