5 FAST & EASY VISUAL EFFECTS in Premiere Pro

5 FAST & EASY VISUAL EFFECTS in Premiere Pro


This video is brought to you by Audioblocks [Cinecom’s Intro music] Jordy here for cinecom.net
and you’re watching Creative Tuesday! We’ve got 5 more super easy visual effects that you can create inside
Adobe Premiere Pro. That’s right, our previous video
got over a million views, so I’m thinking you would like this one too! But first up I’d like to thank
our sponsor Audioblocks, which is an online library for
music and sound effects. For a single price per year
you can download unlimited files, which makes it very interesting to
try out different sound effects, mix them together without
having to break the bank. All the sound effects that you will hear
throughout this video and the nice tune that is playing the
background, all came from Audioblocks. To check it out yourself, follow the
first link in the description below. Starting off with the first effect,
the Harry Potter Invisible cloak! What you’re going to need
is a green screen and a dark fabric. We’re using an old brown curtain for that. Put them on top of each other so that
one side is green and the other dark. Place your camera on a tripod and
let your actor put on the green screen. Keep the camera rolling and jump out of
the frame to have an empty shot as well. Now jumping into Premiere Pro, you place the empty shot on
the bottom of your timeline, and your green screen shot on top of that. Search for the Ultra Key effect
and drag it to the top clip. With the color picker from the Ultra Key
you can select the green to remove it. We have, actually, a dedicated tutorial on
how all the controls of the Ultra Key work, you can find that video
in the description below! And because we have that empty shot
in the background, it now seems like we can see
through that cloak. -Lorenzo, where are you? -Lorenzo, where are you? Lorenzo! Now, you don’t always need to have
a green screen to pull off a chroma key. If you can wait until there’s
a clean blue sky outside, simply film your subject
from a low angle until that blue sky fills up
the entire background. Important is that you expose
for that background. So, it’s best that you close your aperture
or use an ND filter, which are essentially sunglasses
for your camera. If your subject is too much under exposed,
then use a reflector to bounce some light back. You can also use a white
foam board for that. Then going back into Premiere Pro,
we can do the exact same thing. Drag the Ultra Key effect to your clip
and, with the color picker select the blue to remove the sky. Underneath your clip, you can place
a stock image or video of a different sky. This is a common technique
called sky replacement. [Thunder sound] A question that we often get is: what is the difference between
a blue key and a green key? Well, essentially there is no difference. In the old days we would usually pick blue,
as film is more sensitive for blue colors, which makes it easier to pull off a key. Digital cameras, however, are more
sensitive to green colors, which is why the green screen
is so common. Now, blue screens are still used when
your talent is wearing something green, as that is of course hard to key
in front of a green screen. Next up is a fun magic trick with colors. You wanna wear a deep saturated t-shirt. Make sure that the color of that T-shirt do not come back anywhere else
in the background of your video. Jumping back into Premiere Pro, with your clip selected, head over
to the Lumetri panel. On the bottom you will find
the HSL Secondary tab. With the color picker, I can
select the color of that T-shirt. By enabling the mask under the color selectors,
you will see what Lumetri has already selected. But it’s probably not going to be ideal. So, from the top you can choose
the colors that need to be selected. The top arrow defines the selection. And the bottom arrow will feather that
selection for a smoother transition. The next selector is the saturation. Since our T-shirt is well saturated, I know
that I have to select more of the right side. There’re a few red elements visible
in the background, but since they are not as saturated,
I can leave them out of the selection. And finally is the lightness
or exposure of the red color. Play around with these settings
until your mask selection looks good. You can then go ahead
and disable the Mask View. On the bottom you will then see
a bunch of color controls, which you can use to change the color
of the red T-shirt to your desire. -Did you know, I can do magic! -Nothing in my sleeves… [Clap, clap] If you want all the colors to be
desaturated, except for your T-shirt, then you wanna click on
the Invert Mask button. Now everything, but your
T-shirt is selected. This means we can just decrease
the saturation from the slider below to make everything black and white,
except for that one red T-shirt! [Clap, clap, clap!] Lightning is quite easy to make
inside Premiere Pro. As there’s literally an effect called Lightning. However it’s pretty unstable, which is
quite ironic for an effect called Lightning. And that’s why we’re first going to create
a black video, or a black solid. Drag this on top of your impact clip. You can already go ahead
and change the blending mode of the black solid to Linear Dodge, Add. On this layer, we’re going
to add the Lightning effect. There’s a start and end point
for the lightning trail. When you select the effect, you can drag
those points from your program monitor. Place one on the top of your clip
and the other one where it should impact. Normally we should animate one of
the points to let the lightning come in. But that’s what doesn’t work. And that is why I’m going to animate
the position of the black solid, starting from outside of the screen,
back to the default position. To sell the effect even better, we’re going
to add a small explosion to the impact. On Videoblocks I found this
stock clip which I can use. But you can also search the web
for a free alternative. Simply add this explosion to the impact,
scale and reposition it. Finally, change the blending mode to
Screen, to remove the black background. As a final touch, you could also add
a global flash to your shot. For this, I’m creating a new color solid
and choose White. Drag this white solid to the top
of you timeline and change the length to only
be a few frames. Under opacity, change the blending mode to Add and decrease the opacity
to around 70 or 80. You could then animate the opacity from
80 to 0, to make it fade out as well. [Lightning sound] Now, we added some fun practical
effects to the lightning impact as well, which can’t be done in Premiere Pro. These where created with
the magic trick called “The Cut”. In between two cuts,
I changed my hair, added some smear to my face
and put some smoke into my mouth. One of the oldest tricks in the book, and
we also did an advanced tutorial about it. a while back, where we copied
money like Zach King. Film your subject from a tripod
and throw a T-shirt at him. Important is that you make a big
move, but suddenly freeze. Try to remember how you stand and then
put on the shirt that was thrown at you. Go stand back in the same position,
but rewind a little bit. Start your movement again, and pretend like you immediately
caught the T-shirt like this. In Premiere Pro, the only thing that you have
to do is cut away everything in between. And try to match the movements
of your actor. You can sell the effect better by adding
a fake camera motion to it. Since everything was shot from a tripod. We’ve got a free preset pack, which
you can download from our website. There’s a link in the description below. This works by simply creating
an adjustment layer, which you can place on top
of your entire video. Then drag one of the handheld
presets to that adjustment layer. Et voilà! -Lorenzo! -T-shirt parties! Catch! -Wow, awesome! -T-shirt parties! -Woohoo! And those were the 5 super easy
visual effects inside Premiere Pro! Thank you guys so much for watching,
thank you Audioblocks for the support, and like always. Stay Creative! -Hey, Lorenzo, T-shirt parties! -Catch! -Catch! -Catch, Lorenzo! -Hey Yannick, catch! -Got it. -Damn it!

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