5 EDITING Tips for TRAVEL VIDEOS

5 EDITING Tips for TRAVEL VIDEOS


This video is brought to you
by Storyblocks Audio. A couple of months ago, I made
a trip to Iceland. I’ve shot over 400 clips and
published the final video, last week here on
our Youtube channel. I was blown away by all of
the amazing reactions. And many people asked me:
how did you edit that video? Well, here are 5 editing tips
from my Iceland travel video. [Cinecom’s intro music] Hey folks, Jordy here for cinecom.net. First of all, if you haven’t seen
my Iceland video yet, then definitely make sure
to do that first and then come back
for the editing tips! I’ll leave a link to the video up there
and in the description below. I also have a video with 5 tips
for shooting a travel video. I’ve created that right after
I came back from Iceland. I’ll also leave a link to that one
in the description below. So this was my very first travel
video that I’ve ever created. It was a lot of fun, and I’ve learned
so many things from creating that video. Both from shooting and editing. I’m quite proud myself about the end result,
although if I could do it over again, I would do it completely different. But it’s from mistakes or experience
in general that you can learn. So I think, these tutorial videos right here
it’s very nice to give you a head start. But by the end of the day,
you’re going to learn the most by just creating a travel video yourself. So, I really encourage anyone to do that. Even if that’s a travel video
about your own city. Alright, but that’s no why you’re here. You probably wanna see some
gorgeous editing tips. And I’m going to start off
with the sound design. Throughout the entire video you
would hear the camera sounds. Now, there are three main reasons
why I included the camera sound and not just let the music
play at full power. First is to create depth. You’re not just hearing music, but
you’re also hearing what you’re seeing. It’s considered more cinematic as it just
gives so much more depth to your shots. The second reason is to help
the audience understand what’s going on in the shot a lot faster. When you see a bird, it takes
a little bit of time for your brain to understand that it is a bird. With the corresponding sound of a bird, your brain will be able
to process that faster. This allows you to create a fast-cut edit,
which we’ll dive in later. And then the last reason is so that you,
as the editor, can focus on an action. If I would take the real
sound from the camera, you would hear nothing but wind. But I’d like to focus on a detail,
which is a bird arriving at the other bird and it’s not so easy to land over there. So I would add a flapping sound
of their wings. You would never hear that for real,
but as an editor, we can create that sound and let
the viewer focus on a subject or action that we want them to see. So then, where do these
sounds came from? Well, three locations! The first one if from an online library. There’re various libraries out there,
I used Storyblocks Audio for the most. They are also sponsoring this video,
but I also genuinely use their service. And that’s because, when it comes
down to sound effects or beats, their library is just like really strong. All of the sound effects are
high-quality recordings. In a matter of seconds I could
find what I was looking for and I could just download
as much audio clips as I want to without having to pay something extra. There’s this one simple
fixed price per year. I can highly recommend
to check it out yourself, which you can do by clicking the
first link in the description below. The second audio source
was the actual sound of the camera. Even though the internal microphone
of your camera isn’t great, when mixed with music,
it can work out fine. Now, I didn’t used the in-camera
sound much, because of all the wind in Iceland. But it’s always worth checking
the camera sound if there’s something in there
that you could use. Never ignore it. And finally, foley sounds. That’s the fancy term for capturing
your own sound. While I’m editing and I need a specific
sound that I can’t find anywhere else, I would just simply record it. Here’s a shot of Kim rubbing
her hand over ice. Maybe I didn’t knew what to look for,
but I just couldn’t find it. So, I recorded a sound of me
rubbing my shirt. In Premiere Pro, I would often
use the Rate Stretch tool to speed up or slow down the sound. And that would change
the pitch of the audio. And where I’d like to do this
is when I have a swoosh sound that I’d like to use more often. But I also don’t want the audience to
know that I’m recycling sound effects. So, I make sure every swoosh sound’s
a little bit different by stretching them, changing their pitch. Alright, that was the first tip,
-I know- pretty long. But sound design is just
super important! The next editing tip
is called Point of Interest. When you’re making a fast-cut edit, it’s not just about placing
different shots next to each other and cut them to a fast beat. You wanna make sure that the viewer
sees and understands every shot. And like seen before, sound design already
helps processing the shots faster. But even more important
is the Point of Interest. When something happens
here in the frame, the audience is focussed on that point. When you then cut to a shot where the
action lays on the other side of the frame, it will first take some time to search
for that action, to move your eyes to that action and then start with processing
what you’re seeing. So that means, you need to let the
shot stay for a longer time on screen. Or else, your edit is gonna be chaos. The point of interest is the point where the
actions lays or where the viewer looks at, if you then cut to a shot
where the point of interest lays within the same area
as the shot before, the viewer will not have to search for it. So that means that your shots
can be shorter in time and thus you can make
a fast cut edit. Tip number 3, which is a workflow tip! When you have hundreds of shots
and have no idea where to start, then the ‘pancake’ editing technique
might be helpful. Essentially what you do is first
go through all of your shots and take every useful piece from it. Drag that into a timeline. When you’re done, you create
a new sequence. Drag the window of that new
sequence to the bottom so that you have the two sequences
on top of each other. You can now choose to start
your actual edit, by selecting clips from the top sequence. It gives you a better overview, plus you
can skim very fast through your selection. You could also add a third sequence and
use the middle one as a sub-selection. For example, if you have
a bunch of b-roll, you could add that in here and leave
the other shots in the top sequence. Within those selection sequences
you could already make mini-edits. Place shots next to each
other that match, so that it’s easier to bring them
to your final timeline. Stacking sequences or timelines
like this is called ‘Pancake Editing’. Tip 4, transitions! And I’m not talking about
those fancy transitions, but sometimes very subtle things
that I’ve added to almost every cut. I mentioned in my first video,
on how to shoot a travel video, that motion is super important. Both motion from a subject in your
shot and motion from the camera. If there’s no motion, or only one
of the two shots have camera motion, then I would add fake motion
in post production. I usually do this by adding
the Transform effect to a clip, scaling it up through that effect and
then animating the Position property. Finally, set a custom shutter angle
for natural motion blur. This is very minor though. A very gentle pan or tilt
that is barely noticeable. But it connects with the motion
of the second shot. If both of your shots are static, you could
add such an animation on both of them. Important is that you’re going to
ease the right keyframes so that your animation
starts and stops smooth. Again, you don’t want the viewer to actually
notice that there’s a post-animation. And finally the last tip, which is
rhythm and pacing. First of all, try to create a story
within your travel video. Don’t just paste a bunch of shots
next to each other. And this doesn’t have to be much. My story was that we traveled
through Iceland for several days and that the landscape was so beautiful. So, I started with the first steps into
Iceland, the first glimpse that we saw. Here we have a slow rhythm, then for a brief moment I had a fast-cut and then I went back to a slow pacing. And I’m telling a story by doing this. We were overwhelmed by the nature
and wanted to travel fast and see as much as possible, but in fact you shouldn’t do this. You should take your time
and enjoy what’s around you. So that’s slow, fast, and back slow. And then, as we get into
Iceland more and more, we get to travel faster. It’s like riding a bike for the first time. So we get a fast-paced editing
until we see something stunning and go slower again. A fast-cut travel video does not
go super fast from start to finish. You wanna use that rhythm
to tell your story. Also, if you have a fast-cut part,
don’t get predictable in here. It’s actually fun if you have
a fast-cut edit and suddenly break that rhythm
with a stunning shot. Or maybe don’t cut to the next shot,
but cut to the same shot. I’ve actually done that several times
where I would cut to the same shot going in reverse. It’s still a cut on the beat,
but it’s more of a surprise. The reason why it took me about
three months to edit this video is because I struggled to tell a story
with a bunch of a random shots. Eventually, I’m very happy
with the result, though. After I’ve gone through all of my shots
I took the time to reflect to my travel. What was my experience there,
How did I see Iceland? And when I found the answer to that,
I started editing. Thank you so much for watching, thank you Storyblocks Audio
for the support, and like always: Stay Creative! -Jordy, what are you doing? -This is something that
I haven’t tried before, skating out of the elevator. Here we go! Let’s do a kick-flip! Never mind, no, let’s not do a kick-flip!

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