33rd CSUN Assistive Technology Conference – Keynote

33rd CSUN Assistive Technology Conference – Keynote


» SANDY PLOTIN: We’re going to start soon.
Can you take your seat please? Thank you!
Quiet! Sit down and shhhh!
Please. » SANDY PLOTIN: Good evening, everyone. I’m Sandy Plotin and on behalf of California
State University Northridge, I would like to welcome you to the 33rd Annual Assistive
Technology CSUN Conference. And I got that backwards.
[Applause] Even though I promised to not repeat the same
thing every year at the keynote, I’m under contract to do so, so bear with me.
This is the longest and oldest university sponsored event of its kind.
You know that we are valuable and rewarding for newcomers, that we have as researchers,
consumers, practitioners, government representatives, great speakers, and amazing exhibitors.
And I think we can all agree that the CSUN venue is the best.
I’m sure everyone wants to hear about Anaheim. If you don’t know, that’s where the conference
is moving in 2019.>>AUDIENCE: Ohhh.
[Laughter] » SANDY PLOTIN: Oh, no?
You’ll love it. Trust me.
We’re the only game in town. Exhibitors and sponsors, we’ll be contacting
you after this event wraps up and we’ve had some time to debrief.
We’ll have a display where you can get some general information, and it’s also available
on Daisy. I would like you to bear with me for a minute,
because I want to give you a little suggestion. If you want the most accurate information
about the conference, you should really sign up for the mailing list.
We don’t inundate you with a lot of e mails. We’ve seen a few non CSUN quotes and tweets
and sometimes they don’t have the right information. We don’t want you to be misled or confused.
We do love you retweeting, but please start at the source and get your conference news
from CSUN. You’ll save us a lot of time and inconvenience.
Thank you. This has been a public service.
[Laughter] Let me introduce Dr. Caren Sax.
She’s the chair of the post-secondary education and director at the institute at San Diego
State University. In addition to a doctor of education, community
college leadership concentration, she also administers a certificate and a transition
specialist certificate. In what I guess is her spare time, Caren oversees
more than $5 million annually in grants and contracts which are all channeled through
a very long list of programs that are working with assistive technology and people with
disabilities. Caren’s commitment to working in these fields
started when she began her career as a special education and transition teacher.
I don’t think it was that long ago, right? We’re about the same age.
Caren is a valuable colleague, collaborator, and friend.
Please join me in welcoming our 2018 CSUN conference chair, Dr. Caren Sax.
[Cheers and Applause] » CAREN SAX: Thank you, Sandy!
I would like to welcome everybody and welcome back, for those of you who have been here.
Some of us have been regulars at this conference for many years or in some cases decades.
And we look forward to seeing our old friends and to meeting new colleagues.
As Sandy said, this is a wonderful of place to network, share ideas, and make plans for
future collaboration. This conference attracts people with a wide
variety of skills, experiences, interests, and goals for coming here.
Please take advantage of the time to get to know each other at the reception tonight,
during the breaks throughout the conference, while you’re exploring the exhibit hall, and
after sessions have ended for the day. while we’re all here to celebrate technology,
talking to real people in realtime makes for real relationships.
So take advantage of that. so as Sandy mentioned, this is our last conference
in San Diego. We’re kind of sorry to see it go.
We didn’t plan any fireworks or parades or flyovers, which is what we usually do around
here. But we’re guessing that our keynote speaker,
Daniel Goldstein, may provoke some dialogue and discussion and give us plenty to think
about. Dan was the founding partner of Brown, Goldstein,
and Levy in Baltimore. His love of trial work led to commercial matters,
high impact public interest litigation, personal injury, white collar criminal defense, and
many more. As council of the National Federation for
the Blind, he initiated a national legal campaign to ensure access to technology, including
websites, ATMs, and voting machines. His work went beyond litigation to facilitating
partnerships, including the negotiation of joint technology agreements with major technology
developers. in 2011, Dan received the American Bar Association
Paul G. Hern Award for disability rights, which is presented each year to an individual
who has made significant contribution to further the rights, dignity, and access to justice
for people with disabilities. More recently Dan was honored by the National
Federation of the Blind with the Jurnegon Award.
the president of NFB commented that blind Americans have made progress during the last
30 years due to the skill, imagination, heart, and commitment of Daniel Goldstein and his
work with the NFB. Please welcome Dan Goldstein. [Applause] » DAN GOLDSTEIN: I’ll see if I can come up
with some fireworks. I am very honored to deliver the keynote at
this, the 33rd annual CSUN conference on accessible technology.
But I am disappointed and more than a little sad that there needs to be a 33rd annual conference.
Accessibility aside, what in technology takes 33 years?
It’s not that I’m impatient that technology is taking so long.
I might be able to live with that. Rather, I am convinced that we are losing
ground that technology is developing more rapidly than accessibility is progressing
into the technology world. if the title weren’t already taken, this speak
would be called an inconvenient truth. We’re not just grappling with how to make
sure that next year’s technology is accessible when it comes on the market.
We’re still faced with addressing the continuing inaccessibility of a World Wide Web that is
celebrating its 29th birthday. A great, great, great grandfather in technology
generations. For the most part, the technological solutions
to accessibility are known, if not universally used.
For many technologies, the accessibility solutions predated the technologies.
ATMs are a good example. Kiosks are another.
So I suggest we need to stop going about business as usual, at least for a bit because business
as usual is leaving us further behind. And at least stop long enough to ask why after
33 years isn’t virtually all digital technology accessible when it comes to market?
How do we motivate the adoption of accessibility so that accessibility like its younger cousin,
security, is seen as a mandatory feature? Why is accessibility not yet the norm for
websites, employee facing software, employee training videos, phone apps, kiosks, and POS
machines? Are there reasons to lead us to believe that
accessibility, excuse me, that accessibility will be the norm by the 35th annual CSUN conference?
By the 40th? At the 50th?
I do think so unless we understand why we have not succeeded in 33 years.
How long is 33 years in tech development? After CSUN began, Oracle went public, the
internet was born, Facebook, Google, and Amazon all came to be after this conference started
working. Yet Oracle partners and Oracle tools certification
do not require knowledge of how to maintain the accessibility of a product that Oracle
has made accessibility. Blind workers in the healthcare industry can’t
use most functions of Epic software. Amazon not only continues to offer new inaccessible
products. Peter Korn told me that Amazon kiosks or Amazon
lockers are now accessible. But adding accessibility later as an add on
doesn’t cut it. The motto of the disability community isn’t
later is better than never. and Amazon continues to use employment assessment
tests and on the job software that are inaccessible. Now we often say that accessibility isn’t
rocket science. At some point probably everybody in this room
has said that at least once. I wish it were.
Werner Van Braun only took 27 years to lobbying V1 rockets in London to putting a man on the
moon! [Laughter]
[Applause] So if accessibility were rocket science, we
would have had the last CSUN conference six years ago, and inaccessibility technology
would have gone the way of floppy discs. When it comes to technical solutions to accessibility,
we have some of the smartest people in the world.
You’re going to hear from one after me. Richard Ladner.
Judy Brewer, George Kersher, I could go on and on.
The problem is not a lack of technical expertise or that accessibility is inherently difficult.
We must confront the probability that we have not correctly analyzed the problem and thus
need to redirect some of our energies. We are providing the answer three inches to
the question what color is an orange? We need to speak about this with frankness
and urgency. I polled a number of people, some of whom
are in this room, and all of whom will remain anonymous, asking them like the child in the
backseat why aren’t we there yet. I’ll share some of my answers and the nature
of the problem and one way to address it. If these analyses are offbase, feel free to
add your own. I hope there can be a town hall at a future
CSUN about why aren’t we there yet and what do we need to do to get there.
there is no single cause or answer. Not all answers are obtainable, and not all
have equal impact. But I talked to an academic in tech access
issues, and he offered the following. He said we’re going to have inaccessibility
as long as students in computing don’t learn about accessibility and don’t see peers with
disabilities. Now for my part, I agree these are desirable
steps, but they’re not new thoughts. I think I first talked to Judy Brewer about
could this be an M.I.T. curriculum when she was a teenager.
And I suggest that accessibility will not be a required part of a degree program until
there is a greater market demand for accessibility. This academic went onto say that university
systems should be required to report every year on their accessibility as they do with
a report on campus crime statistics and related policies.
To that I would say it would be delicious if that happened.
Transparency would help. But the political climate for the foreseeable
future makes the idea of required reporting on accessibility seem how should I put it?
Delusional. [Laughter]
There is a seed that we’re thinking about. Is there some sort of voluntary reporting
by someone, perhaps corporations and not colleges, that could be stimulated?
Something like the LEED standard for architects. Some of you are probably thinking we already
have a lot of technical standards. That’s not what I mean.
Just be patient. I’ll tell you what my thought is.
Now this academic’s third point is that ADA regulations on web accessibility would help
a way. That could make a difference, but that requires
regime change in this country. And then when there is a new administration,
it may not be even more at the top of that new administration’s agenda than it was at
the top of President Obama’s agenda. I talked to another academic activist who
focused on why the web in particular is inaccessible, although she did not offer a solution.
I have paraphrased her analysis. We forget that the web started around 1994,
but the time the W3C had their first guidelines out in 1996, we were just at the beginning
of a truly ubiquitous use. Hotmail.
Google was in beta and Amazon had just been born.
Yet we only had 100,000 websites. As of today we have a hair under 4.5 billion
web pages. in the beginning, we knew we needed to educate
a finite group of web designers and developers. And then the web literally blew up in front
of us, and the task of creating awareness and training for accessibility changed dramatically.
Currently anyone can put content up on the web.
Whether it’s on Etsy or content on the Knot. Individuals who are not necessarily technically
trained are putting a lot of content on the web.
School of volunteers uploading content of school menus, for example.
This has created a rise to be unable to catch up.
At the same time the web was becoming easier for non technical folks to post content, the
web itself was becoming more technically challenging for web designers and developers.
We now need folks who understand complex dynamic markup.
Not me. And fully understand the ways that barriers
for those with disabilities get innocently put into place.
Web professionals need performance based training plain and simple, and only a few of them are
getting it. This ubiquity with which she speaks adds urgency
to our notion that we must find a way to make accessibility part of the conversation in
a way it has not yet been. I spoke to an employee of a tech company who
in turn spoke of the need for corporate leadership. Now I agree that leadership is important.
But leadership changes. I mean we’ve all seen the ebbs and flows at
Apple and Microsoft that come and go when personnel changes.
And let me ask why would a corporate leader be schooled in what it means to lead an accessible
company? Has the disability community been clear enough
about what accessible company means? And where is the road map to tell them what
to do? I don’t mean put meaningful alt tags on images.
I mean things like make sure all your customer interfaces are accessible.
Leadership alone is not enough. Some of you may have heard Peter Wollack years
ago at an earlier CSUN conference say that he thought when he got a video on accessibility
from Larry Ellison, it was problem solved. And then he found out that the people who
do the coding at Oracle report to someone who reports to someone who doesn’t report
to Larry Ellison, has a deadline and accessibility be dammed, the new product has to get out.
so between turnover at the top and the distance to the bottom, policies and procedures on
accessibility are a more certain guarantee than good leadership and character.
And we need that too. That tech executive also spoke of company
culture and making accessibility part of the conversation from everything from product
development to supply chain. The supply chain issue is critical and therein
lies the makings of a great idea of how to make accessibility viable.
I spoke to another accessibility specialist at another tech company who said to attract
and keep the best and brightest doing accessibility, the work needs to be recognized within the
company in many ways including pay. If the recognition and the big salaries are
in A.I., who wants to be knocking themselves out on accessibility?
The same employee suggested using outside vendors to validate and test accessibility
of software. She distinguished that from the accessibility
of the content. Has proven to be of little or negative value.
And the QA for accessibility must equal what a company does for the QA to check privacy
and security. The better pay for accessibility folks will
come I suggest with increased market demand, which I will suggest shortly will come if
we’re clearer about our non technical expectations. Before turning to my analysis and suggestions,
I want to turn to where one must always turn. To an analysis by a disability rights activist
with a disability. He said you asked why aren’t we done yet.
The answer to that question has a lot to do with the evolution of disability in our society.
In 1985, when CSUN began, disability was not a common image or conversation in the places
where important things were discussed. When it was a topic of conversation, it was
about how do you accommodate. How do you modify so that people with disabilities
might participate? The assumption was that the world is built
in a certain way and then we change it for the disabled.
That model doesn’t work with tech. He continued.
CSUN has the accessibility experts, but where are the power brokers in the tech industry?
Instead of Daniel Goldstein giving the keynote, I thought he was my friend we need the CEO
of Amazon, Google, Oracle, GoDaddy. Really, Go Daddy?
[Laughter] He continued.
What do we need to do. Our best accessibility experts need to build
more way to train people on accessibility, best practices, and techniques.
and I would add some good news that what I learned yesterday with the Accessibility Checker
from EPUB for Daisy that George is going to be discussing. He said that accessibility
needs to be deep in the curriculum. We need to establish mechanisms for weeding
out the bad players. If a company has a VPAT that is clearly not
a reflection of the product performance, what can you do about it?
We need a crowd sourced place to aggregate information about the accessibility of products.
We need new tools for those making procurement decisions to discover information about what
the users say about accessibility. An editorial comment from me on this.
The Tennessee State University System has required software developers to self report
in more detail than VPATs. State accessibility barriers and when they’ll
be addressed and when, and they put this up on the TSU website.
That website needs to be visited and added to as much as possible.
Back to what the activists said. Accessibility needs to be out in the cool
spaces. Accessibility needs to be talked about.
We need products to start competing on accessibility. By the way he asks, have you ever noticed
any of these companies putting accessibility as the first feature of their product?
It’s almost always the last, if it’s on the list at all, packed away with the VPAT.
Instead, he says, tech companies focus their marketing energy on using their expertise
to build specialized products. Microsoft and Google are working on navigation
devices, meanwhile federal employees can’t use SharePoint.
Thousands of people with disabilities have downloaded the Seeing Eye app, but those same
people can’t use the Edge browser. Any users of Google docs until recently
have had a devastating effect on the employment of blind people.
And one that will have an impact for decades after both software programs are fully accessible
wherever they’re used, particularly in federal state, and municipal employment.
The places where blind people have at least had some success in getting jobs.
And the reason I say it will continue is that someone going into one of those position today
who is blind will not see older mentors in responsible positions.
Because they’re sitting by the wayside doing nothing as long as those programs are inaccessible.
This means we need to understand why these programs were initially released as inaccessible
programs if we’re going to make real progress. And people are going to be unhappy when I
say this. Google and Microsoft did the rational thing.
The employment market was not enforcing requirements that workplace software be accessible.
And given the development process that was particularly each one of those, there would
have been significant delays to making them accessible.
Time that would have been used by other companies to grab the market with similarly inaccessible
software. We like to say that accessibility is good
business, so we can’t suddenly change our tune when accessibility is bad business.
Instead we need to break the cycle so that vendors lose out when they introduce inaccessible
software. Here is my suggestion on how to do that.
If I called your employer today and said I would like you to be an accessible company,
a rationale response would be “What do you mean by that?” Sure we have technical standards
like WCAG2.0, and on and on and counting. But what does it mean to be an accessibility
company? It’s a fair question and it’s not answered
by technical standards alone. We need to articulate our expectations of
what is an accessible company. And with that, we should articulate a pledge
for companies to sign onto. If they’re prepared to strive to be accessible
companies. And we need an available pool of guidance
on how to implement those practices. So three parts: Define accessible company,
secure pledges, and give guidance. What would the standard look like?
This is my initial shot that I hope all of you end up modifying and beautifying and everything
else. First the company should ensure that its outward
facing interfaces are accessible. That may be the company’s website, videos,
apps, point of sale machines, kiosks, or all of the apply.
And it would apply as much to Wal Mart, the Social Security administration, Kankakee State
University, if there is such an institution, as to Apple.
I intend to ensure the content to those interfaces must also be accessible.
Outward facing interfaces means employee communications to persons outside the company.
Do your employees know as a standard matter never, ever, ever, ever send an image PDF.
If I had a nickel for every time the NFB got a letter back from a company that said you’re
inaccessible. And they said no we’re not.
And sent it as a letter to the NFB as an image PDF. [Laughter]
But what if the company is on occasion a middleman offering someone else’s technology?
A Staple’s or iPhone app store, Google Play. They must provide information about the accessibility
of that technology to the consumer or the end buyer.
You can’t judge an app by its cover and the seller must tell you the extent, if any, that
the app is accessible. What is the expectation of accessibility for
a company that licenses authoring software, WordPress, Druple, Wix, Go Daddy?
Or is it course management software? Our standard would say that it is their responsibility
to make it easy for customers to make accessible websites hard to make inaccessible websites,
easy to post accessible content on a course management system, and hard to post inaccessible
content. And if a company certifies individuals or
companies that adapt its products for the ultimate consumer, think Oracle certification,
for adapting its call center software, then certification must include training in how
to use Oracle tools to preserve the accessibility that Oracle built in.
I went today back to Oracle University’s website to see if I searched for accessibility what
I would find. And I saw no certification containing your
search terms were found. They put all this work into making the product
accessible! And then they turn it over to people who don’t
know what to do with it. And then I end up having to sue the municipality
or wherever it was for having an inaccessible call center that couldn’t serve blind people.
That doesn’t make sense. The company must look inward.
Is the technology your employees use accessible? The flat bed scanner or the billing software.
You may have guessed, but this is the transformative piece.
The one that gets us to the promised land. Jenny Lay Flurrie tells me that Microsoft
has more than 100,000 vendors and is looking for our supply chain for accessibility.
Think about that for a minute. If we added to that, Sony JP Morgan Chase,
Wal Mart, the Mayo Clinic, the Cal State System, and the commonwealth of Massachusetts and
got them all committed to employee faced accessible software, wouldn’t that be game over?
I mean sure there’s overlap among those vendors, but think about how many vendors that is.
It would then be economic suicide to produce inaccessible software.
Accessibility would, you should pardon the expression, go viral.
CSUN could then be an occasion to get together to do some serious drinking and reminiscing
about the bad old days. [Laughter]
By the way, if anybody wants to talk to me afterwards, I drink scotch. [Laughter]
This inward looking has to include assessment tests, caption training videos, accessible
shuttles at company meetings, and so on. In the speech I mostly put it in terms of
blindness, because that’s what I know. But this is something that applies very much
across disability. What I just described is a mental first draft
of a standard to be modified, corrected, and elaborated by the people in this room.
There are companies out there who truly would like to know what we expect of them and we
owe it to them to tell them that. A document of the sort issued perhaps by a
trade group would be enormously helpful to those who in turn are hired, people in this
room, who are hired to advise companies. There should be certifications at different
levels like LEED. Plat number, gold, silver.
We need a pledge. It can’t be tomorrow.
That’s not going to happen. Nor can it be too vague.
It must have time limited escape clauses that address the standard where they don’t have
an accessible choice on the market. It should provide a sense of accomplishment
when certification is reached. A commercially reasonable pledge could be
very valuable to companies. A potential vendor to Microsoft might convince
Microsoft and the fact that it took the pledge that it should be in the supply chain.
It might get a second look from the federal government customers if and when the federal
government remembers that it’s supposed to enforce 508.
yeah, I know. It’s a little crazy.
The company might even attract investment from mutual funds that specialize in investing
in socially responsible companies. It would mean that disability rights groups
and AHEAD, and CSUN, and others need to be ready for events and plaques that acknowledge
and award pledgees. And we must be there to record the economic
success stories that result from being an accessible company.
Finally, we must be ready to pitch in with resources by user testing for persons with
disabilities, and case studies of what does and doesn’t work.
And when there is a sample of what language to use in a contract to warrant and indemnify
that you are going to provide accessible software, that should go up online so the company doesn’t
have to waste money paying lawyers like me to reinvent the wheel.
This isn’t a complete answer. Actually, I’m a former lawyer now.
This isn’t a complete answer. But I suggest that pledging by a few major
companies would sharply stimulate market demand by its suppliers, and stimulate one or two
colleges to offer classes in accessibility, and may deter a few businesses from using
Go Daddy to build their websites. Maybe what I suggest is wrong, but let’s agree
to figure out together how can we make accessibility faster than technology development.
Until we get to the promised land of accessibility as a universal feature that occasionally needs
tinkering as a new technology develops. I want to express deep appreciation to CSUN
for inviting me to speak. Perhaps by now that invitation is regretted.
[Laughter] But I have relished offering my thoughts on
how we can stamp this completed. And more important, I look forward to hearing
your thoughts on how we can get there. Thank you. [Applause] » CAREN SAX: On behalf of CSUN, we really
want to thank you, Dan. I think you’ve given us a lot to think about.
This is a little plaque for you. Now that you’re retired, you can start collecting
plaques. » DAN GOLDSTEIN: Thank you.
Thank you very much! [Applause] » CAREN SAX: Okay.
So we have a couple of awards that we’re going to announce.
And I would like to invite up Dr. Harry Murphy, who founded this conference 33 years ago.
To present the awards. [Applause] » HARRY MURPHY: My name is Harry Murphy and
I’m a graduate of CSUN. [Applause]
A bit about Fred Strache and a bit about the recipient of the Strache Award, Dr. Ladner,
Fred Strache was the vice president of student affairs at CSUN for many years.
This is not a eulogy. Fred is still around.
And he was here three years ago to present the Strache award to another recipient.
Fred is based in London, because his wife is the head of the Pepperdine University study
abroad in London. And he also divides his time between Malibu
and Honolulu. Tough life!
One of his roles was to administer the student leadership groups at the university.
And he loved doing that because he loved all students.
But he had a special place in his heart for diversity and for any student who was considered
to be a quote non traditional student. He loved them.
He was not a person who used “I” a lot. He liked “we” better.
And he walked the walk and he talked the talk. He did not administer from textbook in administration.
He administered from the heart. He was a country boy from Kentucky.
And he exuded a basic humanness. A basic and sincere love of others.
And I’m the founder of this conference, he is the father.
By that I mean in order to start the conference and commit human and financial resources at
the very beginning, I needed a go from higher administration.
And in my case, that was Fred who was my boss. He was enthusiastic about starting this conference.
I think more than anyone, he had the vision of how this conference could help thousands
of people and over 33 years, tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands.
If anybody understood that, it was Fred. One time during Fred’s time and mine at the
university, the students, including the head of the student leadership group had a sit
in at the university. And they were protesting, I forget what it
was. They were protesting something that they didn’t
like. And so they had a sit in.
And it was absolutely hilarious because most of the administrators were products of the
’60s. And they knew something about sit ins because
most of them had organized better sit ins than these kids were doing.
And in fact, Fred was critical of the “Oh my God, look what they’re doing.
That’s not the right way to do it! This is what they should be doing.” So he
gave them some tips on how to protest the administration, which included himself.
[Laughing] So could we have picked really a better person?
And a better role model for our leadership award?
Okay. A bit about Richard Ladner.
But I need to start with a story, because in 1966, I was a teacher at the Pennsylvania
School for the Deaf in Philadelphia. And I went out to Ball State University in
Muncie, Indiana for a summer workshop. And the objective of the workshop was to review
educational films and then make recommendations on which of those might be captioned for showing
in schools that serve the deaf children. there were 40 participants, 20 of whom were
deaf. And I became very friendly with a very nice
couple, both of whom were teachers at the California School for the Deaf, located in
Berkeley at that time. And their names were Mary and Emil Ladner.
The parents of Richard Ladner. the next year I moved to California.
I kept in touch with them. And the next year I moved to California and
had been in touch with them and I was in L.A. And I was going to make a short trip, vacation
trip up to San Francisco. They invited us to stay with them.
My wife and I, and a 3 year old daughter. And they suggested one night that we have
a night out on the town. And they would babysit.
My 3 year old daughter. So for more than 50 years, Richard, that act
of kindness has always been in my heart and on my mind.
And I get to repay them in a small way by introducing their son, Richard, as the recipient
of this award at this conference. Okay.
Now some nuts and bolts. Dr. Ladner is professor emeritus at the Paul
G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington where he has
been on the faculty since 1971. His principle research area is in evaluating
and creating technologies to help make the lives of people with disabilities better.
He is currently working on the development of an accessible block based programming language
for touch screen tablet computers so that blind children can have early access to computer
programming. Dr. Ladner is the recipient of numerous awards
and honors, including the 2004 presidential award for excellence in science, math, and
engineering mentoring, PAESMEM. My notes say.
And the 2016 ACM SIGACCESS award for outstanding contributions for computing and accessibility.
Dr. Ladner served on the Gallaudet University board of trustees from 2007 to 2016.
Ladies and gentlemen, the recipient of the Strache Award for 2018, Dr. Richard Ladner. [Applause] » RICHARD LADNER: Harry, I had not heard
that story before. My parents babysitting your child.
I’m honored to receive this award and humbled by all the people who received it before me.
This would be the 31st award. I want to thank my parents, Emil and Mary,
wherever you are. They taught me about disability.
And they were Deaf. But they never were negative.
They didn’t think about barriers. They didn’t feel they were handicapped.
But instead they viewed it as kind of an opportunity. And that’s kind of in my heart now.
Because both of my parents had a strong connection with CSUN itself.
After my father retired in 1971, he came down to CSUN to get a master’s degree in the National
Leadership Training Program and with that master’s degree continued to work after age
60. Retired from the school for the deaf and actually
led the RID for a couple of years. So thank you Mary and Emil.
I also want to thank my colleagues at the University of Washington, especially Cheryl
Berkstaller, who is a 2012 winner of the Strache Award for her support and guidance over the
years. I want to thank my many students who have
inspired me in many way to create the next generation of accessible technologies.
I’m really proud of two of my students, Sean and Sherry, both who have significant disabilities.
They’re both professors. One at the University of Colorado and one
at Cornell Tech in New York City. finally I want to thank my wife and daughter
for their continuing support. My younger daughter followed in my footsteps
a bit. She’s in her second year as an occupational
therapist working primarily with people with mobility related disabilities.
I’m learning a lot from her because I don’t know much about mobility related disabilities.
So thank you again very much for this award. [Applause] » HARRY MURPHY: We would like to present
you with this for the occasion. And thank you and congratulation on receiving
this award. [Applause] » RICHARD LADNER: Thank you very much. » HARRY MURPHY: I have an announcement.
Concerning a journal on technology and persons with disabilities.
And the announcement is as follows. Quote.
We want to remind you that a preview PDF draft of the 2018 Journal on Technology and Persons
with Disabilities is available for download. The research manuscripts are now available
at the conference prior to publication for reviewing at the sessions.
Remember, this preview version of the journal is a pre published draft and should not be
used as a reference or cited. We’re on track to public in the spring.
So a big thank you goes out to the editorial team headed by Dr. Klaus Miesenberger, from
Austria, the journal program chair. At this time, for another award, the Art Karshmer
Research Award, I would like to introduce Dr. Klaus Miesenberger and Dr. Judy Karshmer
to give that award. [Applause] » JUDY KARSHMER: So on behalf of my husband,
Art Karshmer, who was very much connected with the work of assistive technology, who
loved this conference. And actually when he came I think they did
do a lot of the beer drinking that you were talking about.
This was the love of his research. It was the people that he met here.
It was the impact that he felt he could have that has been so warm in my heart since his
passing two years ago. I’m so honored to be here.
On behalf of our children, I’m so pleased to be here.
And thank you CSUN, thank you. [Applause] » KLAUS MIESENBERGER:
Ladies and gentlemen, the passing of my dear friend, mentor, teacher, and colleague, Art
Karshmer wasn’t only a personal loss to many people, and for sure many people in this room,
but also a great loss for the field of assistive technology.
We lost an outstanding teacher in computer science and researcher in accessibility for
people with disabilities. Access to math was his passion and his contribution.
And his contributions are still on our mind. as an advisory council member, both Art and
I campaigned and argued to create a conference channel to increase the participation of science
and research community to this conference. The one and only really networking conference
in science and research has to be here. Art and I were proud that this was really
a success from the first conference onward. And therefore, ladies and gentlemen, please
spread the word. There is a scientific journal.
And we would be happy to increase the number of submissions to be more selective and really
to drive the channel to one of the best. Spread the word and submit your finds, science
and research work. through the Dr. Arthur Karshmer Award for
Assistive technology research work, we recognize Art’s leadership in the field.
This new annual award goes to the author of the best submission of the channel track of
the CSUN A.T. conference. Award winners are recognized for their exemplary
submission and excellence in research and the advancement of assistive technology.
It is this award that we honor Dr. Karshmer’s extensive commitment, experience, and passion
in our field and to continue his legacy of innovative research improving the quality
of life of people with disabilities. The scientific track accepts the best papers
only. This award honors the best of the best.
This year’s 2018 and the first Dr. Arthur Karshmer Award for A.T. research goes to STT
Framework Modeler in intervention in elementary grades authored by Samuel Sennott from Portland
State University, Alicia and Hannah from Portland public school district, and Chess from Norfolk
Public Schools. Congratulations. [Applause] » Thank you very much!
» CAREN SAX: Okay. Before we close and move out to the reception,
I would like to acknowledge and thank our major sponsors for this conference.
Without their support, we wouldn’t be able to offer you the depth and breadth of exhibits,
presentations, and other events this conference is known for.
So our sponsors include Accenture, Adobe, Amazon, AT&T, Capital One, Cox, Deque, Google,
Level Access, Microsoft, Oracle, Siteimprove, and VFO. [Applause]
So we would like to ask everybody to go ahead and exit.
We’re going to be taking a few photos up here. If you want to talk to anybody, wait until
we get done with the photos. Wait and exit at the back and we’ll join you
shortly. Enjoy the conference!

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